epoch

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İngilizce - İngilizce
A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point
A notable event which marks the beginning of such a period
A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy
A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point (e.g. January 1, 1970, 00: 00: 00 UTC)
a interval of time, memorable for extraordinary events
{n} a point of time to date from
In geology, a division of time; subland valleys by erosion division of a period
A period of time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation
The date used as the "beginning of time" for timestamps Time values in Unix systems are represented as seconds since the epoch, with library functions available for converting these values into standard date and time formats The epoch on Unix and POSIX systems is 1970-01-01 00: 00: 00 UTC See also "GMT" and "UTC "
amount of time of a particular description of the satellite orbit
A particular instant for which certain data are valid, as the data for which an astronomical catalogue is computed
An arbitrary fixed date, for which the elements used in computing the place of a planet, or other heavenly body, at any other date, are given; as, the epoch of Mars; lunar elements for the epoch March 1st, 1860
a unit of geological time (astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
a unit of geological time
(astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
If you refer to a long period of time as an epoch, you mean that important events or great changes took place during it. The birth of Christ was the beginning of a major epoch of world history. a period of history = era (epocha, from epoche , from epechein ). Unit of geologic time during which a rock series is deposited. It is a subdivision of a geologic period. Additional distinctions can be made by adding relative time terms, such as early, middle, and late. The use of the term is usually restricted to divisions of the Tertiary and Quaternary periods. Eocene Epoch Holocene Epoch Recent Epoch Miocene Epoch Oligocene Epoch Paleocene Epoch Palaeocene Epoch Pleistocene Epoch Pliocene Epoch
A standard 30 second duration of the sleep recording that is assigned a sleep stage designation; for special purposes, occasionally longer or shorter epochs are scored
means that which bounds in or holds in hand The starting-point of a sequence of events harnessed together like a team of horses; also the whole period of time from one epoch to another Our present epoch is the Birth of Christ; previous to this epoch it was the Creation of the World In this latter sense the word is synonymous with era (Greek, epi-echo ) "The incarnation of Christ is the greatest moral epoch in the universe of God " - Stevens: Parables Unfolded ("The Lost Sheep," p 104) Epode (2 syl ) In the Greek epode the chorus returned to their places and remained stationary It followed the strophe (2 syl ) Father of choral epode Stesichoros of Sicily (B C 632-552)
Measurement interval or data frequency, as in making observations every 15 seconds "loading data using 30-second epochs" means loading every other measurement
A period of history; in Unix, “The Epoch” begins at 00: 00: 00 UTC January 1, 1970 This is considered the “dawn of time” by Unix and Unix-like operating systems, and all other time is calculated relative to this date
The beginning time for date and time calculations on UNIX systems The beginning of the epoch is 00: 00: 00 UTC, January 1, 1970
One complete presentation of the training set to the network during training
Number of iterations between the application of the genetic algorithm An epoch, (a block of learning cycles) is performed so that the present population of classifiers can be ranked After an epoch has completed the classifiers are bred via a genetic algorithm to (hopefully) discover a better set of classifiers After the GA is applied the new population starts another epoch of learning cycles The entire process is repeated until the population performs to some standard
The date at which a planet or comet has a longitude or position
The geologic time scale (the earth's time) is divided into eras, which are divided into periods, which are divided into epochs, thus the default name of the time machine derives from It may have been narrowed down to the name "Epoch" and not "Period" or "Era" because you can only warp to time periods in the Cenozoic era, and so the time periods 1000 AD, 12,000 BC, etc may have come that they are the beginning of new epochs (I don't know if they really are) -- Crono & Dekar
A division of geologic time next shorter than a period Example: the Pleistocene epoch is in the Quaternary period
Measurement interval or data frequency, as in making observations every 15 seconds Loading data using 30-second epochs means loading every other measurement
{i} period, era, age; important event
Geologic time unit that is shorter than a period
Epoch signifies the beginning of an era (or event) or the reference date of a system of measurements
A short interval of arbitrarily defined length (usually 20-60 seconds) The sleep stage or state of each consecutive epoch within a bedrest episode is determined from the polygraphic sleep recording
In training a neural net, the term epoch is used to describe a complete pass through all of the training patterns The weights in the neural net may be updated after each pattern is presented to the net, or they may be updated just once at the end of the epoch Frequently used as a measure of speed of learning - as in "training was complete after x epochs"
Epoch (ê´pòk´) noun 1 A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event 2 A period of time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation 3 (Geology) A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period
The coordinates commonly use for the celestial sphere, which are analogous to latitude and longitude for the Earth's surface, are called right ascension and declination The "prime meridian" of this system passes through the position of the Sun at the time of the vernal equinox Thus its position changes slowly over the years, due to the precession of the equinoxes The position of the celestial poles also changes with precession Thus, to locate an object from its right ascension and declination, you must also know the date for which those coordinates are valid; that date is called the epoch of the coordinates
Epoch specifies the time of a particular description of a satellite orbit See Keplerian elements
A precise moment in time which is specified alongside right ascension[?] and declination[?] to pinpoint an exact point in the sky Because the Earth's axis "wobbles" over a period of 26,000 years, Declination and RA coordinates don't technically make sense on their own
A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event; a point of time marked by an event of great subsequent influence; as, the epoch of the creation; the birth of Christ was the epoch which gave rise to the Christian era
a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period
In tidal datum determination, a specific 19 year cycle (approximation of the 18 61 year cycle of the regression of lunar nodes) which covers all tidal variations associated with lunar declination, and over which tidal height observations are meaned to establish the various datums
January 1, 1970, 00: 00: 00 GMT
The presentation of the set of training (input and/or target) vectors to a network and the calculation of new weights and biases Note that training vectors can be presented one at a time or all together in a batch
epoch-making
Constituting an epoch; opening a new era; introducing new conceptions or a new method in the treatment of a subject
epoch-making
highly significant or important especially bringing about or marking the beginning of a new development or era; "epochal decisions made by Roosevelt and Churchill"; "an epoch-making discovery"
epoch-making
An epoch-making change or declaration is considered to be the extremely important because it is likely to have a significant effect on a particular period of time. It was meant to sound like an epoch-making declaration. the epoch-making changes now taking place in Eastern Europe. very important in changing the way people live or the way a society is organized
Amazonian epoch
The most recent of the Martian geologic epochs, from approximately 1.8 billion (1800 million) years ago (the end of the Hesperian epoch) to the present
Hesperian epoch
The second of the three Martian geologic epochs, approximately from 3,500 million years ago to 1,800 million years ago, marked by lava flows, preceded by the Noachian epoch, and followed by the Amazonian epoch
Noachian epoch
The earliest of the Martian geologic epochs, approximately from 3,800 million years ago to 3,500 million years ago, marked by many large impact craters and followed by the Hesperian epoch
Planck epoch
The period immediately after the Big Bang, typically viewed at around one Planck time, whereby all forces were unified
Eocene Epoch
8 to 33.7 million years ago. It follows the Paleocene Epoch and precedes the Oligocene Epoch. The name, derived from the Greek eos ("dawn"), refers to the dawn of recent life; during the Eocene, all the major divisions, or orders, of modern mammals appeared, as well as many essentially modern bird orders. Climates were warm and humid. Temperate and subtropical forests were widespread, but grasslands were limited
Eocene Epoch
Major division of the Tertiary Period, from
Eocene Epoch
{i} era of the second division of the Cenozoic era (Geology)
Holocene Epoch
formerly Recent Epoch Latest interval of the Earth's geologic history, dating from 10,000 years ago to the present. The younger of the two epochs that constitute the Quaternary Period, the Holocene follows the last glacial stage of the Pleistocene Epoch. It is characterized by relatively warm climatic conditions. During this epoch humans have refined the skills that have led to the present level of civilization
Miocene Epoch
8 to 5.3 million years ago. The extensive fossil record of terrestrial life during the Miocene provides a fairly complete picture of the development of vertebrates, especially mammals. Miocene mammals were essentially modern, and half of the known modern families are present in the Miocene record. The horse evolved, mainly in North America, and advanced primates, including apes, were present in southern Europe. Some interchange of faunas occurred in the Northern Hemisphere between the Old and New Worlds. Free communication was possible between Africa and Eurasia, but South America and Australia remained isolated
Miocene Epoch
Major division of the Tertiary Period, from
Oligocene Epoch
Major division of the Tertiary Period, from
Oligocene Epoch
{i} (Geology) epoch in the Tertiary period characterized by the presence of saber-toothed cats
Oligocene Epoch
7 to 23.8 million years ago. It follows the Eocene Epoch and precedes the Miocene Epoch. The term (from the Greek for "few recent forms") refers to the small number of modern animals that originated during this epoch. Oligocene climates appear to have been temperate, and many regions were nearly tropical. Grasslands expanded, and forested regions dwindled. The vertebrates of the northern continents had an essentially modern aspect that is a result less of the appearance of new forms than of the extinction of archaic vertebrates at the close of the Eocene
Paleocene Epoch
8 million years ago. It precedes the Eocene Epoch and follows the Cretaceous Period. The Paleocene was characterized by a generally warming climate, with little or no frost; seasonal variation probably consisted of alternating dry and wet seasons. By the Paleocene the dinosaurs and other reptilian groups that were dominant during the Cretaceous had disappeared, and the epoch saw the rapid proliferation and evolution of mammals
Paleocene Epoch
or Palaeocene Epoch Earliest division of the Tertiary Period, from 65 to
Pleistocene Epoch
{i} geological era in which much of the earth was covered in ice (approximately 2 million to 10000 years ago)
Pleistocene Epoch
Earlier and longer of the two epochs that constitute the Quaternary Period. The Pleistocene began 1.8 million years ago and ended 10,000 years ago. It was preceded by the Pliocene Epoch of the Tertiary Period and followed by the Holocene Epoch. At the height of the Pleistocene glacial ages, more than 30% of the land area of the Earth was covered by glacial ice; during the interglacial stages, probably only about 10% was covered. The animals of the Pleistocene began to resemble those of today, and new groups of land mammals, including humans, appeared. At the end of the epoch, mass extinctions occurred: in North America more than 30 genera of large mammals became extinct within a span of roughly 2,000 years. Of the many causes that have been proposed for these extinctions, the two most likely are changing environment with changing climate and disruption of the ecological pattern by early humans
Pliocene Epoch
Last and shortest epoch of the Tertiary Period, from
Pliocene Epoch
3 to 1.8 million years ago. It follows the Miocene Epoch and precedes the Pleistocene Epoch of the Quaternary Period. Pliocene environments were generally cooler and drier than those of preceding Tertiary epochs. In general, Pliocene mammals grew larger than those of earlier epochs. The more advanced primates continued to evolve, and it is possible that the australopithecines (see Australopithecus), the first creatures that can be termed human, developed late in the Pliocene
chazy epoch
See the Diagram under Geology
chazy epoch
New York
chazy epoch
An epoch at the close of the Canadian period of the American Lower Silurian system; so named from a township in Clinton Co
cincinnati epoch
The group includes the Hudson River and Lorraine shales of New York
cincinnati epoch
The rocks are well developed near Cincinnati, Ohio
cincinnati epoch
An epoch at the close of the American lower Silurian system
epochs
plural of epoch
epochs
holocene
genesee epoch
The closing subdivision of the Hamilton period in the American Devonian system; - - so called because the formations of this period crop out in Genesee, New York
glacial epoch
ice age, period in history when glaciers covered most of the surface of the earth
medina epoch
A subdivision of the Niagara period in the American upper Silurian, characterized by the formations known as the Oneida conglomerate, and the Medina sandstone
medina epoch
See the Chart of Geology
epoch

    Heceleme

    ep·och

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    ipık

    Eş anlamlılar

    era, age, date, span, time

    Telaffuz

    /ˈēpək/ /ˈiːpək/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'e-p&k, 'e-"päk, U ] (noun.) 1614. From Medieval Latin epocha Ancient Greek ἐποχή (epokhē, “a check, cessation, stop, pause, epoch of a star, e.e., the point at which it seems to halt after reaching the highest, and generally the place of a star; hence, a historical epoch”) ἐπέχειν (epechein, “to hold in, check”) ἐπί (épí, “upon”) + ἔχειν (echein, “to have, hold”).

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