epochs

listen to the pronunciation of epochs
İngilizce - Türkçe

epochs teriminin İngilizce Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

epoch
{i} çağ
epoch
devir
epoch
zaman
epoch
(Jeoloji) epok
holocene
holosen
epoch
dönem
epoch
an
epoch
çığır

Berlin Duvarı'nın yıkılışı gerçekten çığır açan bir olaydı. - The fall of the Berlin Wall was really an epochal event.

holocene
dördüncü zamana ait birikinti
epoch
mark an epoch yeni bir devir açmak
epoch
epochal yeni bir devre ait
epoch
tarih
epoch
an,tarihsel dönem
epoch
dönüm noktası/çağ
holocene
holosen (son 100 bin yılı kapsayan dönem)
İngilizce - İngilizce
plural of epoch
holocene
epoch
A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point (e.g. January 1, 1970, 00: 00: 00 UTC)
epoch
a interval of time, memorable for extraordinary events
epoch
{n} a point of time to date from
epoch
A period of time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation
epoch
The date used as the "beginning of time" for timestamps Time values in Unix systems are represented as seconds since the epoch, with library functions available for converting these values into standard date and time formats The epoch on Unix and POSIX systems is 1970-01-01 00: 00: 00 UTC See also "GMT" and "UTC "
epoch
amount of time of a particular description of the satellite orbit
epoch
A particular instant for which certain data are valid, as the data for which an astronomical catalogue is computed
epoch
An arbitrary fixed date, for which the elements used in computing the place of a planet, or other heavenly body, at any other date, are given; as, the epoch of Mars; lunar elements for the epoch March 1st, 1860
epoch
a unit of geological time (astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
epoch
a unit of geological time
epoch
In geology, a division of time; subland valleys by erosion division of a period
epoch
If you refer to a long period of time as an epoch, you mean that important events or great changes took place during it. The birth of Christ was the beginning of a major epoch of world history. a period of history = era (epocha, from epoche , from epechein ). Unit of geologic time during which a rock series is deposited. It is a subdivision of a geologic period. Additional distinctions can be made by adding relative time terms, such as early, middle, and late. The use of the term is usually restricted to divisions of the Tertiary and Quaternary periods. Eocene Epoch Holocene Epoch Recent Epoch Miocene Epoch Oligocene Epoch Paleocene Epoch Palaeocene Epoch Pleistocene Epoch Pliocene Epoch
epoch
A standard 30 second duration of the sleep recording that is assigned a sleep stage designation; for special purposes, occasionally longer or shorter epochs are scored
epoch
(astronomy) the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred
epoch
means that which bounds in or holds in hand The starting-point of a sequence of events harnessed together like a team of horses; also the whole period of time from one epoch to another Our present epoch is the Birth of Christ; previous to this epoch it was the Creation of the World In this latter sense the word is synonymous with era (Greek, epi-echo ) "The incarnation of Christ is the greatest moral epoch in the universe of God " - Stevens: Parables Unfolded ("The Lost Sheep," p 104) Epode (2 syl ) In the Greek epode the chorus returned to their places and remained stationary It followed the strophe (2 syl ) Father of choral epode Stesichoros of Sicily (B C 632-552)
epoch
Measurement interval or data frequency, as in making observations every 15 seconds "loading data using 30-second epochs" means loading every other measurement
epoch
A period of history; in Unix, “The Epoch” begins at 00: 00: 00 UTC January 1, 1970 This is considered the “dawn of time” by Unix and Unix-like operating systems, and all other time is calculated relative to this date
epoch
The date at which a planet or comet has a longitude or position
epoch
One complete presentation of the training set to the network during training
epoch
Number of iterations between the application of the genetic algorithm An epoch, (a block of learning cycles) is performed so that the present population of classifiers can be ranked After an epoch has completed the classifiers are bred via a genetic algorithm to (hopefully) discover a better set of classifiers After the GA is applied the new population starts another epoch of learning cycles The entire process is repeated until the population performs to some standard
epoch
The geologic time scale (the earth's time) is divided into eras, which are divided into periods, which are divided into epochs, thus the default name of the time machine derives from It may have been narrowed down to the name "Epoch" and not "Period" or "Era" because you can only warp to time periods in the Cenozoic era, and so the time periods 1000 AD, 12,000 BC, etc may have come that they are the beginning of new epochs (I don't know if they really are) -- Crono & Dekar
epoch
The beginning time for date and time calculations on UNIX systems The beginning of the epoch is 00: 00: 00 UTC, January 1, 1970
epoch
A short interval of arbitrarily defined length (usually 20-60 seconds) The sleep stage or state of each consecutive epoch within a bedrest episode is determined from the polygraphic sleep recording
epoch
Measurement interval or data frequency, as in making observations every 15 seconds Loading data using 30-second epochs means loading every other measurement
epoch
A division of geologic time next shorter than a period Example: the Pleistocene epoch is in the Quaternary period
epoch
The presentation of the set of training (input and/or target) vectors to a network and the calculation of new weights and biases Note that training vectors can be presented one at a time or all together in a batch
epoch
{i} period, era, age; important event
epoch
Geologic time unit that is shorter than a period
epoch
A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point
epoch
A notable event which marks the beginning of such a period
epoch
Epoch signifies the beginning of an era (or event) or the reference date of a system of measurements
epoch
A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy
epoch
In training a neural net, the term epoch is used to describe a complete pass through all of the training patterns The weights in the neural net may be updated after each pattern is presented to the net, or they may be updated just once at the end of the epoch Frequently used as a measure of speed of learning - as in "training was complete after x epochs"
epoch
Epoch (ê´pòk´) noun 1 A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event 2 A period of time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation 3 (Geology) A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period
epoch
The coordinates commonly use for the celestial sphere, which are analogous to latitude and longitude for the Earth's surface, are called right ascension and declination The "prime meridian" of this system passes through the position of the Sun at the time of the vernal equinox Thus its position changes slowly over the years, due to the precession of the equinoxes The position of the celestial poles also changes with precession Thus, to locate an object from its right ascension and declination, you must also know the date for which those coordinates are valid; that date is called the epoch of the coordinates
epoch
Epoch specifies the time of a particular description of a satellite orbit See Keplerian elements
epoch
A precise moment in time which is specified alongside right ascension[?] and declination[?] to pinpoint an exact point in the sky Because the Earth's axis "wobbles" over a period of 26,000 years, Declination and RA coordinates don't technically make sense on their own
epoch
A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event; a point of time marked by an event of great subsequent influence; as, the epoch of the creation; the birth of Christ was the epoch which gave rise to the Christian era
epoch
a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
epoch
A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period
epoch
In tidal datum determination, a specific 19 year cycle (approximation of the 18 61 year cycle of the regression of lunar nodes) which covers all tidal variations associated with lunar declination, and over which tidal height observations are meaned to establish the various datums
epoch
January 1, 1970, 00: 00: 00 GMT
epochs

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    /ˈēpəks/ /ˈiːpəks/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'e-p&k, 'e-"päk, U ] (noun.) 1614. Medieval Latin epocha, from Greek epochE cessation, fixed point, from epechein to pause, hold back, from epi- + echein to hold; more at SCHEME.

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