banding

listen to the pronunciation of banding
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} sarma
sar
(Tekstil) bant geçirme
band
şerit
band
{i} bando

Bando çeşitli marşlar çaldı. - The band played several marches.

Tom şu anda lise bandosunda ilk trompetini çalıyor. - Tom currently plays first trumpet in his high school band.

band
grup

Senin en sevdiğin grup hangisidir? - What's your favorite band?

Bir grup kentin içinden geçit açtı. - A band led the parade through the city.

band
{i} takım
band
{i} orkestra

Bu kulüpte canlı bir orkestra ya da bir DJ var mı? - Is there a live band or a DJ in this club?

Tom orkestra üyelerinden bazıları ile tanışıp tanışamayacağını görmek için kulise gitti. - Tom went backstage to see if he could meet some of the band members.

band
{f} şerit yapmak
band
{i} mızıka
band
{i} kemer
band
{f} bantla
band
{i} çete
band
bilezik
band
sırım
band
(Denizbilim) görünge
band
topluluk
band
şebeke
band
seril
band
(Dilbilim) kuşak aralığı
band
kolan
band
tasma
band
zümre
band
çalgı takımı
band
kurdele
band
saz takımı
band
sürü

Festivalde bir sürü büyük gruplar vardı. - There were a lot of great bands at the festival.

Bir sürü paket lastiğim var. - I have lots of rubber bands.

band
birleşmek
band
kelepçe
band
türküm
band
kuşak
band
bant

Bu hizmeti kullanmak için yeterli bant genişliğine sahip değiliz. - We don't have enough bandwidth to use that service.

band
(together ile) birleşmek
band
birlik olmak
band
renk şeridi
band
sıra
band
müzik grubu

Bu gece kaç tane müzik grubu çalıyor olacak? - How many bands will be playing tonight?

Birkaç ay sonra o rock müzik grubunu terk etti. - A few months later he left the rock band.

band
kayış
band
{i} frekans bandı
band
bantlamak
band
{i} uzun çizgi
band
aralık
band
çizgi
band
{i} şarkı (plâk)
band
çizgilerle süslemek
band
{f} bağlamak
band
{i} sargı

Sargınızı değiştirmeliyiz. - We need to change your bandage.

Tom Mary'nin sargılı bileklerini fark etti. - Tom noticed Mary's bandaged wrists.

band
{f} çemberlemek
band
kordele
band
(Askeri) ATEŞ ŞERİDİ: Bak. "band of fire"
band
bant,v.bantla: n.bant
colloform banding
kolloform bantlanma
flow banding structure
akma bantı yapısı
flow banding texture
akma bantı doku
gneissose banding
gnaysöz bantlı-yapı oluşumu
İngilizce - İngilizce
A pattern of band-like markings

You can recognize this species of bird by the banding on the wing.

Present participle of band
The linear pattern apparent in remotely sensed images, which is caused by a detector imbalance of the sensor
a strip or stripe of a contrasting color or material
Narrow inlay or marquetry of a color or grain which contrasts with the surface it decorates Also refers to other long, narrow ornamentation (painting, carving, etc )
An artifact of color gradation where graduated colors are reduced to larger blocks of a single color
Patterns (stripes) on a print caused by insufficient color or gray-scale ranges within the output device's image processor, or insufficient information contained within the original scan Creates harsh, well-defined transitions between different ranges
An Inlay or Marquetry that produces a color or grain contrast along the perimeter of a surface such as a tabletop
-Also called "photographing," "striping," "tracking," etc When dry, the area over the joint is a different color from that of the field area Usually caused by a difference in porosity between the joint compound and the gypsum board
(verb) Banding is a printing defect characterized by light or dark lines in an image in the direction of the printing In the case of ink jet imaging it is caused by a jet or printhead that is not properly aligned, inoperative, or incorrectly indexed (see also STITCHING)
The process of putting a band of paper or polythene round two publications making them into one 'unit' Also known as Belly Banding
In digital printing, this term refers to patterns on a print caused by insufficient colour or gray-scale ranges within the output devices image processor, or insufficient information contained within the original scan Banding is most noticeable in printed areas that fade from light to dark
Visible bands or steps that appear in a vignette, blend, or graduated fill when output
Putting identification bands on birds When peregrine babies are about 20 days old, environmental scientists put numbered bands on both legs This helps scientists to track the birds and follow their progress over the years
Distinct differences of patterns instead of a smooth transition of colors or other effects in a gradient Banding can take place in continuous tone images on a display using less than 24-bit information, or when printing gradients without sufficient color information Typically, clogged inkjet heads are the source of the problem
A visible stepping of shades in a gradient
Banding may represent small scale sedimentary layering in a syngenetic deposit such as a massive sulphide or repeated pulses of mineralization in a vein
{i} (Dentistry) procedure of cementing orthodontic bands to teeth
The differential staining of a chromosome by a variety of techniques that results in a specific pattern of positively and negatively stained bands for each chromosomal pair
A visible stair-stepping of shades in a gradient
Extraneous lines in a printed page or displayed image On a monitor, banding occurs when the colour depth of the video signal isn't rich enough to display a continuous colour gradient The undesirable effect of waves or bands of the same colour on a digital graphic Banding often occurs in images that include finely graduated transitions from one colour to another The effect can be created by sending an image to an output device that can't support the number of shades necessary to preserve the integrity of the image Banding also occurs when an image is saved without enough colour depth in the file At its worst, banding ends up making images look like they were drawn with cheap magic markers, which is interesting, but rarely the desired effect
making the pulmonary artery narrower with a band to reduce blood flow to the lungs
In electronic pre-press, a visible stair-stepping of shades in a gradient or blend
(1) The white bands which can be produced if interpreted data is sent too slowly to recorders that cannot stop/start successfully (see data underrun) In these types of recorders, the media continues to feed through even though no image is available to print, resulting in white bands in the output Screen's HQ RIPs use a printer buffer to ensure that data is sent to the recorder at a steady rate This significantly reduces the chance of this problem occurring (2) The stripes of color that occurs in a vignette when too few colors are available to achieve a smooth color blend
The horizontal lines that sometimes appear when printing graphics This occurs when the print head is misaligned See also MicroWeave
White bands which can be produced if data is sent too slowly to recorders that cannot stop/start successfully The media continues to feed even though no image is available to print, resulting in white bands in the output Stripes of color that occur when too few colors are available to achieve a smooth color blend A visible stair-stepping of shades in a gradient
The process of cementing orthodontic bands to the teeth
If any creatures are banded, The banding attacker or defender may decide where all damage is applied amongst banded creatures Both banded creatures get an attack when banded, but the banded creatures defend as one creature, combining any bonuses to parry they both have into one bonus
veneer cut into narrow strips and applied to create a decorative effect, usually found around the edges of tables and drawer fronts
banding plane
A plane used for cutting out grooves and inlaying strings and bands in straight and circular work
band
To fasten an identifying band around (a bird's) leg
band
A strip of material wrapped around things to hold them together
band
A group of musicians, especially (a) wind and percussion players, or (b) rock musicians
band
To group together for a common purpose
band
A part of radio spectrum
edge banding
Alternative spelling of edgebanding
band
A band is a small group of musicians who play popular music such as jazz, rock, or pop. He was a drummer in a rock band Local bands provide music for dancing. see also one-man band
band
A band is a group of musicians who play brass and percussion instruments. Bands played German marches. see also brass band
band
A band of people is a group of people who have joined together because they share an interest or belief. Bands of government soldiers, rebels and just plain criminals have been roaming some neighborhoods. a small but growing band of Japanese companies taking their first steps into American publishing
band
{i} strip of material; stripe of color; orchestra, musical group; gang; group of people who live or work together
band
{n} a tie, bandage, linen ornament, company
band
{v} t. to tie or join together, unite, conspire
band
A stripe, streak, or other mark transverse to the axis of the body
band
To confederate for some common purpose; to unite; to conspire together
band
A group of people loosely united for a common purpose (a band of thieves)
band
1 The range of frequencies between two defined limits 2 One of the six specific wide-area telephone service (WATS) geographic service areas
band
A narrow strip of cloth or other material on any article of dress, to bind, strengthen, ornament, or complete it
band
a range of frequencies between two limits
band
A band is a strip or loop of metal or other strong material which strengthens something, or which holds several things together. Surgeons placed a metal band around the knee cap to help it knit back together. a strong band of flat muscle tissue. see also elastic band, rubber band
band
Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress
band
a stripe of contrasting color; "chromosomes exhibit characteristic bands"
band
and drums, or cymbals
band
A band is a flat, narrow strip of cloth which you wear round your head or wrists, or which forms part of a piece of clothing. Almost all hospitals use a wrist-band of some kind with your name and details on it. see also armband, hatband, waistband
band
Range of radio frequencies between two defined limits which are used in wireless communications 800 to 1900 MHz is the band used for CDMA
band
a group of musicians playing popular music for dancing
band
jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (often set with jewels) worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger"; "he noted that she wore a wedding band"
band
A bond
band
The range of frequencies within two defined limits
band
That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie
band
A range of frequencies, as defined by regulatory authorities or by commonly accepted usage
band
Pledge; security
band
A single range of the electromagnetic spectrum as detected by a sensor See also Sensor and Channel
band
A range of frequencies between two defined limits
band
A continuous range of frequencies extending between two specified limiting frequencies, often referred to as frequency band
band
A number of musicians who play together upon portable musical instruments, especially those making a loud sound, as certain wind instruments trumpets, clarinets, etc
band
The frequency spectrum between 2 defined limits
band
- A specific segment of the frequency spectrum; used primarily in discussions of crossovers and equalizers
band
{f} join together; place a strip of some material on
band
A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries
band
A wavelength interval in the electromagnetic spectrum For example, in Landsat sensors the bands designate specific wavelength intervals at which images are required
band
something elongated that is worn around the body or one of the limbs a strip or stripe of a contrasting color or material a restraint put around something to hold it together a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to identify it (as in studies of bird migration) a stripe of contrasting color; "chromosomes exhibit characteristic bands"
band
A range of some physical variable, as of radiation wavelength or frequency A range of very closely spaced electron energy levels in solids, the distribution and nature of which determine the electrical properties of a material
band
bind or tie together, as with a band
band
A space between elevated lines or ribs, as of the fruits of umbelliferous plants
band
something elongated that is worn around the body or one of the limbs
band
a set of data file values for a specific portion of the electromagnetic spectrum of reflected light or emitted heat (red, green, blue, near-infrared, infrared, thermal, etc ) or some other user-defined information created by combining or enhancing the original bands, or creating new bands from other sources Sometimes called "channel "
band
To mark with a band
band
instrumentalists not including string players
band
A frequency range of operation, such as the AM and FM bands of commercial radio or the multiple operating bands of a CB transceiver
band
A band is a slice of wavelengths from the electromagnetic spectrum Landsat ETM+ has eight bands which collect radiation from different parts of the electro-magnetic spectrum Of the eight bands, three bands are visible light, one band is panchromatic, three bands are infrared, and one band is thermal infrared
band
To bind or tie with a band
band
A band is a range of numbers or values within a system of measurement. a new tax band of 20p in the pound on the first £2,000 of taxable income. see also waveband see also wedding band. to put people or things into different groups, usually according to income, value, or price. Type of human social organization consisting of a small number of nuclear families (see family) or related subgroups who are loosely organized for purposes of subsistence or security. Bands may be integrated into a larger community or tribe. They generally exist in sparsely populated areas and possess relatively simple technologies; their habitats range from the desert (Australian Aboriginals) to the African rainforest (Bambuti) to the North American tundra (Kaska). Bands may occasionally coalesce for broader community ceremonies, hunting, or warfare. See also hunting and gathering society; sociocultural evolution. Musical ensemble that generally excludes stringed instruments. Ensembles of woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments originated in 15th-century Germany, taking on a particularly military role; these spread to France, Britain, and eventually the New World. In the 15th-18th centuries, many European towns had town musicians, or waits, who performed especially for ceremonial occasions in wind bands often consisting primarily of shawms and sackbuts (trombones). In the 18th-19th centuries, the English amateur brass band, largely consisting of the many newly developed brass instruments, took on the important nonmilitary function of representing organizations of all kinds. In the U.S., Patrick Gilmore's virtuoso band became famous in the mid-19th century; his greatest successor, John Philip Sousa, bequeathed a repertory of marches that has remained very popular. The "big band," under leaders such as Duke Ellington and Count Basie, was central to American popular music in the 1930s and '40s. In the rock band, unlike most other bands, stringed instruments (electric guitars and electric bass) are paramount
band
A group of energy levels in a solid state material. Valence band, conduction band
band
Band is: (1) The range of frequencies between two defined limits (2) In reference to WATS (Wide Area Telephone Service), one of the five specific geographic areas as defined by the carrier See also Bandwidth
band
snv A continuous range of frequencies In communications, the frequency spectrum between two defined limits [MIL-HDBK-1908B]
band
A clearly defined range of radio frequencies dedicated to a particular purpose
band
In wireless communication, band refers to a frequency or contiguous range of frequencies
band
A group of aboriginals that has official recognition as an organized unit by the federal government of Canada
band
The range of frequencies in which signals are transmitted
band
a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to identify it (as in studies of bird migration)
band
attach a ring to the foot of, in order to identify; "ring birds"; "band the geese to observe their migratory patterns"
band
A band is a strip of something such as colour, light, land, or cloth which contrasts with the areas on either side of it. bands of natural vegetation between strips of crops A band of light glowed in the space between floor and door
band
A belt or strap
band
a strip or stripe of a contrasting color or material
band
To bandy; to drive away
band
Range of frequencies
band
A type of orchestra originally playing janissary music; i.e. marching band
band
A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc
band
an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot"
band
To unite in a troop, company, or confederacy
band
A company of persons united in any common design, especially a body of armed men
band
A group organized together for a common purpose Clusters of outnumbered Witnesses in hostile territory are sometimes referred to by this term <<The small band of Bible Students, now known as Jehovah's Witnesses, that tried to help church members see the unchristian origin of many of Christendom's doctrines, has moved to rid itself of all Babylonish beliefs and practices received through {apostate} Christendom >> [re 51] The phrase small band is used similarly five times in the Revelation Climax book alone
band
To fasten together with a band
band
To fasten an identifying band around (a birds) leg
band
of Bind
band
a restraint put around something to hold it together
band
A strip along the spine of a book where the pages are attached
band
In Gothic architecture, the molding, or suite of moldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts
band
a range of frequencies between two limits instrumentalists not including string players bind or tie together, as with a band
band
the frequency spectrum between two defined limits; e g high frequencies, also known as the shortwave band (3-30 MHz) or a portion of it, e g the 60-meter band (4750-5060 kHz); c f tropical bands - a set of frequencies assigned for a particular use
band
In EQ, a range of frequencies
band
(1) The range of frequencies between two defined limits (2) In reference to WATS, one of the six specific geographic service areas as defined by Sprint
band
A fillet, strap, or any narrow ligament with which a thing is encircled, or fastened, or by which a number of things are tied, bound together, or confined; a fetter
band
A range of frequencies between two predetermined limits
band
A small group of people living in a simple society
Türkçe - İngilizce

banding teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

band
strap
band
sliver
band
sling
band
tape

Tom handed Mary the roll of masking tape. - Tom maskeleme bandı rulosunu Mary'ye uzattı.

When the police entered the basement, they found Tom tied to a chair with duct tape over his mouth. - Polisler bodruma girdiğinde Tom'u ağzında bir koli bandıyla bir sandalyeye bağlı buldular.

banding