clement

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A male given name, borne by an early pope and by several saints

And I intreat thee also, true yokefellow, help those women which laboured with me in the gospel, with Clement also, and with other my fellowlabourers, whose names are in the book of life.

Lenient or merciful; charitable
Said of weather and similar circumstances that are mild
compassionate
{a} kind, merciful, courteous
borne by an early pope and by several saints
{s} merciful, lenient; mild, tender
(of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather
(used of persons or behavior) inclined to show mercy; "a more clement judge reduced the sentence" (of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather
(used of persons or behavior) inclined to show mercy; "a more clement judge reduced the sentence"
(of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather"
mild
Clement weather is pleasantly mild and dry. inclement. clement weather is neither too hot nor too cold = mild   inclement (clemens ). adj. orig. Pierre Roger born 1291, Corèzze, Aquitaine died Dec. 6, 1352, Avignon, Provence Pope (1342-52). Archbishop of Sens and Rouen, he was made cardinal in 1338 and was consecrated pope at Avignon four years later (see Avignon papacy). He launched a Crusade against Smyrna in 1344, ending the piracy of the Ottoman Turks. He also restored papal authority in the Romagna region, which was disputed by families of the Italian nobility. In exchange for his protection, Joan I of Naples sold him Avignon. Clement opposed the Franciscan ascetics known as the Spirituals, enlarged the papal palace, and fostered art and scholarship. adj. orig. Giulio de' Medici born May 26, 1478, Florence died Sept. 25, 1534, Rome Pope (1523-34). The illegitimate son of Giuliano de' Medici (see Medici family), he was raised by his uncle Lorenzo de' Medici. In 1513 he was made archbishop of Florence and cardinal by his cousin Pope Leo X. He commissioned art from Raphael and Michelangelo. A weak and vacillating political figure mainly interested in advancing Medici interests, Clement allied with France in 1527, which led to Emperor Charles V's sack of Rome. Clement's indecisiveness complicated Henry VIII's request for an annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, which contributed to Henry's decision to break with the church in Rome. His poor leadership also allowed the Reformation to develop further. adj. orig. Bertrand de Got born 1260, Bordelais region, France died April 20, 1314, Roquemaure, Provence Pope (1305-14), the first to reside at Avignon, France. He became archbishop of Bordeaux in 1299 and was elected pope six years later. By creating a majority of French cardinals, he ensured the election of a line of French popes. He moved the seat of the papacy to Avignon, under pressure from King Philip IV of France, who also forced Clement to annul Pope Boniface VIII's decisions that were unfavourable to France. The king also compeled the pope to dissolve the Templars, which Philip brutally suppressed. Clement opposed Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII after 1313 and appointed the king of Naples as imperial vicar on Henry's death. His decretals, the Clementinae, were a notable contribution to canon law. adj. Attlee Clement Richard 1st Earl Attlee of Walthamstow Clement of Alexandria Saint Clement VI Clement VII Clement V Thomas Clement Douglas Greenberg Clement Moore Clement Clarke Vallandigham Clement Laird
Mild in temper and disposition; merciful; compassionate
Clement 1st Earl Attlee of Walthamstow Attlee
born Jan. 3, 1883, Putney, London, Eng. died Oct. 8, 1967, Westminster, London British Labour Party leader (1935-55) and prime minister (1945-51). Committed to social reform, he lived for much of the years (1907-22) in a settlement house in London's impoverished East End. Elected to Parliament in 1922, he served in several Labour governments and in the wartime coalition government of Winston Churchill, whom he succeeded as prime minister in 1945. Attlee presided over the establishment of the welfare state in Britain, the nationalization of major British industries, and the granting of independence to India, an important step in the conversion of the British Empire into the Commonwealth of Nations. He resigned when the Conservatives narrowly won the election in 1951
Clement Attlee
a British politician in the Labour Party who was Prime Minister from 1945 to 1951. His government established the UK's National Health Service and the modern welfare state (1883-1967)
Clement Clarke Moore
born July 15, 1779, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 10, 1863, Newport, R.I. U.S. scholar remembered for the ballad that begins "'Twas the night before Christmas. " Moore cofounded General Theological Seminary and taught Oriental and Greek literature there (1821-50). He is said to have composed "A Visit to St. Nicholas" to amuse his children on Christmas 1822, and it was published anonymously in the Troy (N.Y.) Sentinel, on Dec. 23, 1823. In 2000 it was determined that the poem was probably the work of Henry Livingston, Jr. (1748-1828)
Clement Greenberg
born Jan. 16, 1909, New York, N.Y., U.S. died May 7, 1994, New York City U.S. art critic. After graduating from Syracuse University, he returned to his native New York City and began writing for such publications as Partisan Review and The Nation, promoting an approach to looking at art that became known as "Greenbergian formalism." The chief arbiter of art in the U.S. from the late 1940s through the 1950s, he exerted extraordinary influence as a champion of Abstract Expressionism and its leading exponent, Jackson Pollock. He routinely visited galleries and artists' studios and promoted the work of many, including Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, and David Smith. He disavowed such later movements as Pop art and conceptual art and wrote little after the 1960s
Clement L Vallandigham
v. born July 29, 1820, Lisbon, Ohio, U.S. died June 17, 1871, Lebanon, Ohio U.S. politician. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1857-63), where he became a leader of the antiwar Copperheads and the secret Knights of the Golden Circle (later Sons of Liberty). As a result of his vociferous criticism of Pres. Abraham Lincoln's administration and its pursuit of the American Civil War, he was arrested and found guilty of treasonable sentiments (1863) and was sentenced to exile in the South. He soon made his way to Canada and later illegally to Ohio. While in Canada he was nominated for governor by the Ohio Peace Democrats, but he was easily defeated. He later criticized the Reconstruction policy of the Republicans as both unconstitutional and tyrannical
Clement Laird Vallandigham
v. born July 29, 1820, Lisbon, Ohio, U.S. died June 17, 1871, Lebanon, Ohio U.S. politician. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1857-63), where he became a leader of the antiwar Copperheads and the secret Knights of the Golden Circle (later Sons of Liberty). As a result of his vociferous criticism of Pres. Abraham Lincoln's administration and its pursuit of the American Civil War, he was arrested and found guilty of treasonable sentiments (1863) and was sentenced to exile in the South. He soon made his way to Canada and later illegally to Ohio. While in Canada he was nominated for governor by the Ohio Peace Democrats, but he was easily defeated. He later criticized the Reconstruction policy of the Republicans as both unconstitutional and tyrannical
Clement Richard 1st Earl Attlee of Walthamstow Attlee
born Jan. 3, 1883, Putney, London, Eng. died Oct. 8, 1967, Westminster, London British Labour Party leader (1935-55) and prime minister (1945-51). Committed to social reform, he lived for much of the years (1907-22) in a settlement house in London's impoverished East End. Elected to Parliament in 1922, he served in several Labour governments and in the wartime coalition government of Winston Churchill, whom he succeeded as prime minister in 1945. Attlee presided over the establishment of the welfare state in Britain, the nationalization of major British industries, and the granting of independence to India, an important step in the conversion of the British Empire into the Commonwealth of Nations. He resigned when the Conservatives narrowly won the election in 1951
Clement V
Pope (1305-1314) befriended by Philip IV of France, who arranged his election as pope and at whose request the papal residence was moved from Rome to Avignon (1309)
Clement VII
Pope (1523-1534) who refused to grant the divorce of Henry VIII from Catherine of Aragon and was unable to stop Henry's break with the Roman Catholic Church
Clement of Alexandria
Greek Christian theologian who attempted to combine Gnosticism with Platonism
Saint Clement of Alexandria
Latin Titus Flavius Clemens born 150, Athens died between 211 and 215, Palestine; Western feast day November 23; Eastern feast day November 24 Christian apologist, missionary theologian to the Hellenistic world, and leader of the catechetical school at Alexandria. He was converted to Christianity by Pantaenus, a former Stoic who preceded him as head of the Alexandria school. Clement believed that philosophy was for the Greeks what the Law of Moses was for the Jews, a preparatory discipline leading to the truth. He asserted that men lived first as citizens of heaven and second as earthly citizens, and he defended the right of an enslaved people to rebel against its oppressors. Persecution by the emperor Septimius Severus in 201-202 obliged him to leave Alexandria and take refuge with Alexander, bishop of Jerusalem. He was revered as a saint in the Latin church until 1586, when doubts about his orthodoxy led to the removal of his name from the list of Roman saints
clemently
In a clement manner
clemently
mercifully; mildly
clement
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