frank

listen to the pronunciation of frank
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} frenk
içten
{s} samimi

Personel toplantıda samimi bir görüş alışverişinde bulunmuştur. - The staff exchanged frank opinions in the meeting.

Lütfen benimle samimi ol. - Please be frank with me.

{s} açık sözlü

O, oldukça açık sözlü bir kişidir. - He is an extremely frank person.

Tom o konuda çok açık sözlüydü. - Tom was quite frank about it.

{s} dürüst

Tom son derece dürüst bir kişi. - Tom is an extremely frank person.

Gerçekten dürüst olmamı istiyor musun? - Do you really want me to be frank?

pullamak
mektubu makineyle damgalamak
açıkkalpli
(mektup) damgalamak
doğru sözlü
(posta pulunu) damgalamak
(zarfın üstüne) posta damgasını veya posta ücretinin ödenmiş olduğunu gösteren bir işareti basmak
ücretsiz gitmesi için mektupların üstüne atılan imza
{f} mektubu ücretsiz gitmesi için damgalamak
(isim) frenk
i., k.dili., bak. frankfurter
parasız göndermek
{s} ücretsiz giden mektup
{s} içi dışı bir
postada ücretsiz gitm
{f} ücretsiz göndermek (mektup)
dili sosis
{s} sözünü esirgemeyen
ortaçağda Cermen kavimlerinden birine mensup kimse
Avrupalı
damgala
{s} açıksözlü; açıkyürekli, açıkkalpli; düşüncelerini/duygularını açıkça gösteren; içten, samimi
damgalamak
serbest
samimiyet
ücretsiz göndermek mektup
açıkyürekli
frankly
açıkça

Açıkçası, bir hata yaptın. - Frankly speaking, you made a mistake.

Açıkçası, siz elinizden gelen gayreti göstermediniz. - Frankly speaking, you haven't tried your best.

frank the letter
frank mektup
frankly
samimi olarak

O, samimi olarak suçunu itiraf etti. - She frankly admitted her guilt.

Biz oldukça samimi olarak konuştuk. - We talked quite frankly.

frankly
açıkçası

Açıkçası, onun konuşmaları her zaman sıkıcı. - Frankly speaking, his speeches are always dull.

Açıkçası, bir hata yaptın. - Frankly speaking, you made a mistake.

frankly
dürüstçe

Dürüstçe konuşulursa, o güvenilmez bir adamdır. - Frankly speaking, he is an unreliable man.

Ben görüşlerini dürüstçe ifade eden insanlara hayranım. - I admire people who express their opinions frankly.

frankly
içtenlikle
frankly
z. açıkça
frankness
{i} açık sözlülük
frankly
işin doğrusu
frankly
açık açık
frankly
açık söylemek gerekirse
frankly
dobra dobra
frankly
samimi

Biz oldukça samimi olarak konuştuk. - We talked quite frankly.

O, samimi olarak suçunu itiraf etti. - She frankly admitted her guilt.

To be frank
açık sözlü olmak
be frank
dürüst olmak

Dürüst olmak gerekirse, bu komplo teorisi bana çok saçma geliyor. - To be frank, I think this 'conspiracy theory' is nonsense.

franking
mektup damgalama
to be frank
dürüst olmak
frankly
doğrusu

Doğrusu, canım, vız gelir tırıs gider. - Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.

frankly
açık sözlü bir şekilde
frankness
{i} açık yüreklilik
frankness
[n] samimiyet
frankness
samimiyet

Onun çocuksu samimiyetine gülmekten kendimi alamadım. - I couldn't help smiling at her childlike frankness.

frankness
{i} açıksözlülük
Türkçe - Türkçe
Fransa, İsviçre, Belçika gibi ülkelerin para birimi
İngilizce - İngilizce
A surname
One of the Franks, a Germanic federation that inhabited parts of what are now France, the Low Countries and Germany
A male given name
A hot dog or sausage

Buy a package of franks for the barbecue.

the grey heron
To place a frank on an envelope

It will be so ridiculous to see all his letters directed to him with an M.P.—But do you know, he says, he will never frank for me?”.

Honest, especially in an manner that seems slightly blunt

May I be frank with you?.

Free postage, a right exercised by governments (usually with definite article)
The notice on an envelope where a stamp would normally be found
{n} a free letter, french silver coin of 18 1-2 cents value
{v} to make free, exempt, pay for, fatten
{a} liberal, generous, open, sincere, free
originally derived from the medieval tribal name, revived in the nineteenth century and now considered as a diminutive of Francis
{i} member of an ancient Germanic people who conquered Gaul and established France
{i} male first name (form of Francis or Franklin); family name; Anne Frank (1929-1945), young German Jewish girl who kept a diary while she and her family were hiding from the Nazis in Holland (she was eventually captured and died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp)
a smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smoked; often served on a bread roll
characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion; "blunt talking and straight shooting"; "a blunt New England farmer"; "I gave them my candid opinion"; "forthright criticism"; "a forthright approach to the problem"; "tell me what you think--and you may just as well be frank"; "it is possible to be outspoken without being rude"; "plainspoken and to the point"; "a point-blank accusation"
{i} mark or signature which allows a letter or package to be sent free of charge; right to affix such a mark; letter or package which has such a mark
clearly manifest; evident; "frank enjoyment"
A pigsty
An indication on a cover that postage is prepaid, partially prepaid or that the letter is to be carried free of postage Franks may be written, hand-stamped, imprinted or affixed Free franking is usually limited to soldiers' mail or selected government correspondence Postage stamp and postage meter stamps are modern methods of franking a letter
v (1) To distribute non-apa material (such as a convention flyer) through an apa (2) To include a fanzine by a non-member in one's submission to an apa, without claiming it for page credit (3) To send material through an apa which one has produced for other purposes, and which does not count for page credit
The common heron; so called from its note
To shut up in a frank or sty; to pen up; hence, to cram; to fatten
stamp with a postmark to indicate date and time of mailing
When a letter or parcel is franked, it is marked with a symbol that shows that the proper charge has been paid or that no stamp is needed. The letter was franked in London on August
To extempt from charge for postage, as a letter, package, or packet, etc
If someone is frank, they state or express things in an open and honest way. `It is clear that my client has been less than frank with me,' said his lawyer They had a frank discussion about the issue. = candid + frankly frank·ly He now frankly admits that much of his former playboy lifestyle was superficial. + frankness frank·ness The reaction to his frankness was hostile
A name given by the Turks, Greeks, and Arabs to any of the inhabitants of the western parts of Europe, as the English, Italians, Germans, Spaniards, French, etc
a member of the ancient Germanic peoples who spread from the Rhine into the Roman Empire in the 4th century
The privilege of sending letters or other mail matter, free of postage, or without charge; also, the sign, mark, or signature denoting that a letter or other mail matter is to free of postage
a self-addressed, franked envelope. A member of one of the Germanic tribes of the Rhine region in the early Christian era, especially one of the Salian Franks who conquered Gaul about 500 and established an extensive empire that reached its greatest power in the ninth century. German Jewish diarist who fled from Nazi Germany to Amsterdam with her family (1933) and kept a diary during her years in hiding (1942-1944). She and her family were captured (August 1944) and sent to concentration camps. Anne died of typhus in the camp at Belsen. Her diary was published in 1947. Swiss-born American photographer and filmmaker noted for his clear-cut documentary style and interest in popular culture. A frankfurter. to print a sign on an envelope showing that the cost of sending it has been paid franking machine. Member of a Germanic-speaking people who invaded the western Roman Empire in the 5th century. The Franks lived east of the Rhine River in the 3rd century and came under Roman influence. They gained control of northern Gaul by 494 and southern Gaul by 507, and the conversion of their leader Clovis I to Catholic Christianity won them the support of the clergy and the Gallo-Roman population in Gaul. The Franks established one of the most powerful kingdoms of the early Middle Ages, ruling lands in present-day France (to which they gave their name), Belgium, and western Germany. The Merovingian dynasty to which Clovis belonged was succeeded by the Carolingian dynasty, whose most notable ruler, Charlemagne, created a great empire across Christian Europe. The division of the realm in the 9th century and the subsequent dissolution of a unified Frankish empire foreshadowed the formation of the modern countries of western Europe. Baum Lyman Frank Buckley William Frank Jr. Burnet Sir Frank Macfarlane Capra Frank Chapman Frank Michler Frank James Cooper Duryea Charles Edgar and James Frank Frank Annelies Marie Frank Jacob Frank Robert Gehry Frank Owen Johnson Frank Minis Jr. Kellogg Frank Billings Knight Frank Hyneman Leavis Frank Raymond Leslie Frank Libby Willard Frank Loesser Frank Henry Munsey Frank Andrew Murphy Frank Musial Stanley Frank O'Connor Frank Robinson Frank Sinatra Frank Frank Morrison Spillane Stella Frank Philip Wedekind Frank Whittle Sir Frank Wright Frank Lloyd Frank Yang Zappa Frank James Jesse and James Frank
A French coin
{s} honest, sincere, straightforward
A native or inhabitant of Western Europe; a European; a term used in the Levant
exempt by means of an official pass or letter, as from customs or other checks
free
A member of one of the German tribes that in the fifth century overran and conquered Gaul, and established the kingdom of France
Unrestrained; loose; licentious; used in a bad sense
Unbounded by restrictions, limitations, etc
a smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smoked; often served on a bread roll a member of the ancient Germanic peoples who spread from the Rhine into the Roman Empire in the 4th century exempt by means of an official pass or letter, as from customs or other checks clearly manifest; evident; "frank enjoyment
{f} apply a mark or signature which allows a letter or package to be delivered without charge; grant the right to apply such a mark; deliver without charge
To send by public conveyance free of expense
Liberal; generous; profuse
Free in uttering one's real sentiments; not reserved; using no disguise; candid; ingenuous; as, a frank nature, conversation, manner, etc
guileless
Frank Jr. Johnson
born Oct. 30, 1918, Halyeville, Ala. died July 23, 1999, Montgomery, Ala. U.S. judge. After graduating at the top of his law-school class at the University of Alabama in 1943, he joined the army, becoming an infantry lieutenant. After the war he returned to Alabama to practice law. Appointed to the federal district court for middle Alabama in 1955, he became widely known for his decisions in support of the civil rights movement. In 1955 he voted with the majority to strike down the bus-segregation law challenged by Rosa Parks, and in 1965 he issued the order that allowed Martin Luther King, Jr., to lead a historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. He also ordered the desegregation of various public facilities in Alabama, and he was the first federal judge to dictate legislative reapportionment. He served on the U.S. District Court of Appeals from 1979 to 1992. In 1995 he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Frank Andrew Munsey
born Aug. 21, 1854, Mercer, Maine, U.S. died Dec. 22, 1925, New York City, N.Y. U.S. newspaper and magazine publisher. He managed a telegraph office before moving to New York City, where he founded Golden Argosy (1882), later renamed Argosy Magazine; and Munsey's Magazine (1889), the first inexpensive, general-circulation, illustrated magazine in the U.S. He acquired several newspapers in Baltimore and New York, some of which disappeared in profitable mergers. He viewed his publications purely as moneymaking enterprises and maintained colourless editorial policies. He left most of his large fortune to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City
Frank B Kellogg
born Dec. 22, 1856, Potsdam, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1937, St. Paul, Minn. U.S. lawyer and diplomat. He represented the U.S. government in antitrust cases before serving in the U.S. Senate (1917-23) and as U.S. ambassador to Britain (1923-25). Appointed U.S. secretary of state (1925-29) by Pres. Calvin Coolidge, he negotiated the multinational Kellogg-Briand Pact, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1929. He later served on the Permanent Court of International Justice (1930-35)
Frank Billings Kellogg
born Dec. 22, 1856, Potsdam, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1937, St. Paul, Minn. U.S. lawyer and diplomat. He represented the U.S. government in antitrust cases before serving in the U.S. Senate (1917-23) and as U.S. ambassador to Britain (1923-25). Appointed U.S. secretary of state (1925-29) by Pres. Calvin Coolidge, he negotiated the multinational Kellogg-Briand Pact, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1929. He later served on the Permanent Court of International Justice (1930-35)
Frank Burnet Macfarlane
(1899-1985) Australian biologist who was a pioneer in the application of ecological principles to viral diseases, winner of the 1960 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work
Frank Capra
{i} (1897-1946) Italian-born United States film director
Frank Capra
a US film director, born in Italy, who made films with a gentle humour and sympathy for ordinary people, such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and It's a Wonderful Life (1946) (1897-1991). born May 18, 1897, near Palermo, Sicily, Italy died Sept. 3, 1991, La Quinta, Calif., U.S. U.S. film director. At age six he immigrated with his family to the U.S. After holding various jobs in the film industry, he emerged as a major director with That Certain Thing (1928) and Platinum Blonde (1931). He won Academy Awards for It Happened One Night (1934) and Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), stories that portray naive idealists who triumph over more worldly types. He chose the same theme for his next film, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) but departed from his usual style in Lost Horizon (1937) and Meet John Doe (1941). Capra also won a third Academy Award for You Can't Take It with You (1938). He made the documentary series Why We Fight during World War II and the Christmas classic It's a Wonderful Life (1946)
Frank Gehry
born in Canada, who is known for his unusual buildings with interesting shapes. He designed the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, which opened in 1997 (1929- ) a US architect (=someone who designs buildings)
Frank H Knight
born Nov. 7, 1885, White Oak township, McLean county, Ill., U.S. died April 15, 1972, Chicago, Ill. U.S. economist. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1916. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1927 to 1952; Milton Friedman was one of the many students he influenced. His book Risk, Uncertainty and Profit (1921) distinguished between insurable and uninsurable risks and asserted that profit was the reward entrepreneurs earned for bearing uninsurable risk. His monograph "Economic Organization" is a classic exposition of microeconomic theory. He is considered the founder of the Chicago school of economics
Frank Henry Loesser
born June 29, 1910, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 28, 1969, New York City U.S. composer, librettist, and lyricist. The son of a piano teacher, in 1936 he moved to Hollywood, where he worked with Burton Lane, Jule Styne, Jimmy McHugh, and Hoagy Carmichael. His wartime songs include "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition" and "What Do You Do in the Infantry?"; postwar hits include "On a Slow Boat to China" and "Baby It's Cold Outside" (Academy Award, 1949). His first Broadway musical was Where's Charley? (1948; film, 1952). In 1950 he produced Guys and Dolls (film, 1955), one of the greatest American musicals. It was followed by The Most Happy Fella (1956) and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1962, Pulitzer Prize). His work for film includes the score for Hans Christian Andersen (1952)
Frank Hyneman Knight
born Nov. 7, 1885, White Oak township, McLean county, Ill., U.S. died April 15, 1972, Chicago, Ill. U.S. economist. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1916. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1927 to 1952; Milton Friedman was one of the many students he influenced. His book Risk, Uncertainty and Profit (1921) distinguished between insurable and uninsurable risks and asserted that profit was the reward entrepreneurs earned for bearing uninsurable risk. His monograph "Economic Organization" is a classic exposition of microeconomic theory. He is considered the founder of the Chicago school of economics
Frank Leslie
orig. Henry Carter born March 29, 1821, Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng. died Jan. 10, 1880, New York, N.Y., U.S. British-U.S. illustrator and journalist. The Illustrated London News published his early sketches. He moved to the U.S. in 1848. There he founded numerous newspapers and journals, including the New York Journal (1854), Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (1855) having changed his name in 1857 and Frank Leslie's Boys' and Girls' Weekly (1866). His illustrations from Civil War battlefields earned him his greatest profits. His second wife, Miriam Florence Leslie (1836-1914), legally changed her name to Frank Leslie after his death and continued his business after his death, twice rescuing it from debt. When she died a wealthy woman, she left most of her estate to the feminist Carrie Chapman Catt in the service of the suffragist cause
Frank Lloyd Wright
a US architect who most people regard as the most important US architect of the 20th century. He is famous for his use of modern materials and methods, in buildings such as the Guggenheim Museum in New York (1869-1959). born June 8, 1867, Richland Center, Wis., U.S. died April 9, 1959, Phoenix, Ariz. U.S. architect. After studying engineering briefly at the University of Wisconsin, he worked for the firm of Dankmar Adler (1844-1900) and Louis Sullivan in Chicago before opening his own practice there in 1893. Wright became the chief practitioner of the Prairie school, building about 50 Prairie houses from 1900 to 1910. Early nonresidential buildings include the forward-looking Larkin Building in Buffalo, N.Y. (1904; destroyed 1950), and Unity Temple in Oak Park, Ill. (1906). In 1911 he began work on his own house, Taliesin, near Spring Green, Wis. The lavish Imperial Hotel in Tokyo (1915-22, dismantled 1967) was significant for its revolutionary floating cantilever construction, which made it one of the only large buildings to withstand the earthquake of 1923. In the 1930s he designed his low-cost Usonian houses, but his most admired house, Fallingwater, in Bear Run, Pa. (1936), is an extravagant country retreat cantilevered over a waterfall. His Johnson Wax Building (1936-39), an example of humane workplace design, touched off an avalanche of major commissions. Of particular note is the Guggenheim Museum (1956-59), which has no separate floor levels but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright's ideal of a continuous space. Throughout his career he retained the use of ornamental detail, earthy colours, and rich textural effects. His sensitive use of materials helped to control and perfect his dynamic expression of space, which opened a new era in American architecture. Often considered the greatest U.S. architect of all time, his greatest legacy is "organic architecture," or the idea that buildings harmonize both with their inhabitants and with their environment
Frank Lloyd Wright
{i} (1869-1959) major figure in architecture in the United States during the 20th century
Frank Loesser
born June 29, 1910, New York, N.Y., U.S. died July 28, 1969, New York City U.S. composer, librettist, and lyricist. The son of a piano teacher, in 1936 he moved to Hollywood, where he worked with Burton Lane, Jule Styne, Jimmy McHugh, and Hoagy Carmichael. His wartime songs include "Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition" and "What Do You Do in the Infantry?"; postwar hits include "On a Slow Boat to China" and "Baby It's Cold Outside" (Academy Award, 1949). His first Broadway musical was Where's Charley? (1948; film, 1952). In 1950 he produced Guys and Dolls (film, 1955), one of the greatest American musicals. It was followed by The Most Happy Fella (1956) and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1962, Pulitzer Prize). His work for film includes the score for Hans Christian Andersen (1952)
Frank Macfarlane Burnet
{i} (1899-1985) Australian physician and virologist who was a pioneer in the application of ecological principles to viral diseases, winner of the 1960 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in the field of physiology or medicine, known also as Macfarlane and Mac Burnet
Frank Michler Chapman
born , June 12, 1864, Englewood, N.J., U.S. died Nov. 15, 1945, New York, N.Y. self-taught U.S. ornithologist. He began his career at the American Museum of Natural History in 1887 and was curator of ornithology in 1908-42; his exhibits were some of the first to display birds in naturalistic settings. He founded and edited (1899-1935) the magazine Bird-Lore. Among his many important works are Handbook of Birds of Eastern North America (1895) and several on South American birds
Frank Minis Jr. Johnson
born Oct. 30, 1918, Halyeville, Ala. died July 23, 1999, Montgomery, Ala. U.S. judge. After graduating at the top of his law-school class at the University of Alabama in 1943, he joined the army, becoming an infantry lieutenant. After the war he returned to Alabama to practice law. Appointed to the federal district court for middle Alabama in 1955, he became widely known for his decisions in support of the civil rights movement. In 1955 he voted with the majority to strike down the bus-segregation law challenged by Rosa Parks, and in 1965 he issued the order that allowed Martin Luther King, Jr., to lead a historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. He also ordered the desegregation of various public facilities in Alabama, and he was the first federal judge to dictate legislative reapportionment. He served on the U.S. District Court of Appeals from 1979 to 1992. In 1995 he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Frank Murphy
orig. William Francis Murphy born April 13, 1890, Harbor Beach, Mich., U.S. died July 19, 1949, Detroit, Mich. U.S. Supreme Court justice (1940-49). After serving in World War I, he held several elective posts, including mayor of Detroit (1930-33). He was governor-general (1933-35) and U.S. high commissioner (1935-36) of the Philippines. Elected governor of Michigan (1937-38), he refused to use troops to break sit-down strikes by automobile workers. As U.S. attorney general (1939-40), he established the Justice Department's civil rights unit. Appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States by Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt, he strongly defended civil rights and dissented in a case upholding the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II
Frank Norris
born March 5, 1870, Chicago, Ill., U.S. died Oct. 25, 1902, San Francisco, Calif. U.S. novelist and short-story writer. Norris initially worked as an overseas correspondent and in publishing. He became the first important American author to embrace naturalism. McTeague (1899) is a portrait of an acquisitive society. He adopted a more humanitarian ideal beginning with his masterpiece, The Octopus (1901), the first novel of a projected trilogy dealing with the economic and social forces involved in the wheat industry. The second part, The Pit, appeared in 1903, but the third was unwritten at his death. Despite romanticizing tendencies, his works present a vivid, authentic picture of life in California in his day
Frank O Gehry
born Feb. 28, 1929, Toronto, Ont., Can. Canadian-born U.S architect. He studied at the University of Southern California and Harvard University. In his early buildings, his use of inexpensive materials (chain-link fencing, plywood, corrugated steel) gave many of his projects an unfinished, whimsical air. His structures are often characterized by unconventional or distorted shapes that have a sculptural, fragmented, or collagelike quality. In designing public buildings, he tends to cluster small units within a larger space rather than creating monolithic structures, thus emphasizing human scale. Of particular note is his Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (1991-97) in Spain, a shimmering pile of sharply twisting, curving shapes surfaced in titanium. Gehry won the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1989
Frank O'Connor
orig. Michael O'Donovan born 1903, Cork, County Cork, Ire. died March 10, 1966, Dublin Irish writer. Brought up in poverty, O'Connor became a librarian and a director of Dublin's Abbey Theatre. He won popularity in the U.S. for short stories in which apparently trivial incidents illuminate Irish life. They appeared in volumes including Guests of the Nation (1931) and Crab Apple Jelly (1944) and in The New Yorker magazine. He also wrote critical studies on Irish life and literature and translations of Gaelic works of the 9th-20th centuries, including the great 17th-century satire The Midnight Court (1945)
Frank Owen Gehry
born Feb. 28, 1929, Toronto, Ont., Can. Canadian-born U.S architect. He studied at the University of Southern California and Harvard University. In his early buildings, his use of inexpensive materials (chain-link fencing, plywood, corrugated steel) gave many of his projects an unfinished, whimsical air. His structures are often characterized by unconventional or distorted shapes that have a sculptural, fragmented, or collagelike quality. In designing public buildings, he tends to cluster small units within a larger space rather than creating monolithic structures, thus emphasizing human scale. Of particular note is his Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (1991-97) in Spain, a shimmering pile of sharply twisting, curving shapes surfaced in titanium. Gehry won the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1989
Frank Philip Stella
born May 12, 1936, Malden, Mass., U.S. U.S. painter. He moved to New York City after studying history at Princeton University and there began his innovative "black paintings" (1958-60), incorporating symmetrical series of thin white stripes that replicated the canvas shape when seen against their black backgrounds. As a leading figure of Minimalism, in the mid 1960s he began using polychromy in an influential series marked by intersecting geometric curvilinear shapes and plays of vivid and harmonious colours. In the 1970s he began producing sensuously coloured, mixed-media reliefs featuring more organic shapes. He was given retrospective exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in 1970 and 1987
Frank Raymond Leavis
born July 14, 1895, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng. died April 14, 1978, Cambridge British literary critic. He attended and later taught at Cambridge University. He brought a new seriousness to criticism, believing that the critic's duty is to assess works according to the author's moral position. He cofounded Scrutiny, a journal (published 1932-53) often regarded as his greatest contribution to English letters. His books include New Bearings in English Poetry (1932) and The Great Tradition (1948), in which he reassessed the English novel
Frank Robinson
born Aug. 31, 1935, Beaumont, Tex., U.S. U.S. baseball player and the first black manager in major league baseball. Robinson played principally for the Cincinnati Reds (1956-65) and Baltimore Orioles (1966-71). In 1966 he won the triple crown, leading the league in home runs (49), runs batted in (122), and batting average (.316). He later managed the Cleveland Indians (1975-77), San Francisco Giants (1981-84), Baltimore Orioles (1988-91), and Montreal Expos (since 2002)
Frank Sinatra
a US singer and film actor, who first became successful in the 1940s, and is famous especially for the song My Way. He is one of the most famous and successful singers of the 20th century (1915-98). orig. Francis Albert Sinatra born Dec. 12, 1915, Hoboken, N.J., U.S. died May 14, 1998, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. singer and actor. Sinatra began his singing career in the mid-1930s and was "discovered" by trumpeter Harry James, who immediately recruited him. Sinatra achieved sweeping national popularity in 1940-42 while singing with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. He sang on the radio program Your Hit Parade (1943-45), while becoming a favourite performer in theatres and nightclubs. In the 1940s he co-starred in a number of musical films with dancer Gene Kelly. His popularity suddenly declined about 1948, but his performance in From Here to Eternity (1953, Academy Award) revived his flagging career, and he later starred in many acclaimed films, including musicals such as Guys and Dolls (1955) and dramas such as The Manchurian Candidate (1962). After 1953 he performed and recorded using arrangements by Nelson Riddle, Billy May, and Gordon Jenkins, reaching his peak in albums such as Only the Lonely (1958). In 1961 he founded Reprise Records. His masterly performances, alternately swinging and affectingly melancholic, brought him a success unparalleled in the history of American popular music
Frank Sinatra
{i} (1915-1998, born Francis Albert Sinatra) one of the greatest United States actor and singer, known as "blue-eyes
Frank Stella
born May 12, 1936, Malden, Mass., U.S. U.S. painter. He moved to New York City after studying history at Princeton University and there began his innovative "black paintings" (1958-60), incorporating symmetrical series of thin white stripes that replicated the canvas shape when seen against their black backgrounds. As a leading figure of Minimalism, in the mid 1960s he began using polychromy in an influential series marked by intersecting geometric curvilinear shapes and plays of vivid and harmonious colours. In the 1970s he began producing sensuously coloured, mixed-media reliefs featuring more organic shapes. He was given retrospective exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in 1970 and 1987
Frank Stockton
{i} (1834-1902) U.S. humorist and writer
Frank Wedekind
orig. Benjamin Franklin Wedekind born July 24, 1864, Hannover, Hanover died March 9, 1918, Munich, Ger. German actor and playwright. He lived in Switzerland (1872-84) and then in Munich, where he worked at various jobs, including journalist and cabaret performer. He wrote plays from 1891, when his tragedy The Awakening of Spring created a scandal with its theme of awakening adolescent sexuality. In his "Lulu" cycle, Earth Spirit (1895) and Pandora's Box (1904), he extended the theme of sex to the underworld of society and introduced the amoral Lulu. His plays used episodic scenes, fragmented dialogue, distortion, and caricature, prefiguring the Theatre of the Absurd and forming a transition from realism to Expressionism
Frank Zappa
(1940-1993) American rock musician, songwriter, political commentator
Frank Zappa
a US musician and singer who wrote many different types of music, including classical music, but is famous for his rock music, which was always new and different, and which criticized American society and music of the 1960s and 1970s. His group was called The Mothers of Invention (1940-93). v. orig. Francis Vincent Zappa born Dec. 21, 1940, Baltimore, Md., U.S. died Dec. 4, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. rock musician and composer. Zappa grew up in California and taught himself drums and guitar. He wrote film scores in the early 1960s. In 1964 he began working with the Soul Giants, who eventually became the Mothers of Invention. He became known for his musical virtuosity and wildly eccentric wit on albums such as Freak Out! (1966), We're Only in It for the Money (1967), Lumpy Gravy (1967), Absolutely Free (1967), Sheik Yerbouti (1979), and Jazz from Hell (1988). His greatest commercial success was "Valley Girl" (1982), featuring his daughter Moon Unit
frank breech
position of a fetus in which the buttocks are present at the maternal pelvic outlet
ballpark frank
An oversized hotdog served at stadium games, particularly baseball, football, American football and rugby
franker
Comparative form of frank: more frank
franking
Device or marking such as postage stamp, printed or stamped impressions, codings, labels, manuscript writings, or any other authorized form of markings affixed or applied to mails to qualify them to be postally serviced
franking
Present participle of frank
frankly
In truth, to tell the truth

Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.

Franks
The people of a Germanic federation who inhabited the area that is now France, the Low Countries and part of Germany
frankly
{a} liberally, freely, without reserve
frankness
{n} plainness, openness, candor, freedom
Anne Frank
a Jewish girl who wrote a famous diary, in which she describes her life while she and her family were hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam. The family was eventually discovered, and sent to the Nazi concentration camp of Belsen, where most of them died (1929-45). born June 12, 1929, Frankfurt am Main, Ger. died March 1945, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, near Hannover German diarist. Frank was a young Jewish girl who kept a record of the two years her family spent in hiding in Amsterdam to escape Nazi persecution. After their discovery by the Gestapo in 1944, the family was transported to concentration camps; Anne died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen. Friends searching the hiding place found her diary, which her father published as The Diary of a Young Girl (1947). Precocious in style and insight, it traces her emotional growth amid adversity and is a classic of war literature
Anne Frank
{i} (1929-1945) young German Jewish girl who kept a diary while she and her family were hiding from the Nazis in Holland (she was eventually captured and died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp)
Annelies Marie Frank
born June 12, 1929, Frankfurt am Main, Ger. died March 1945, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, near Hannover German diarist. Frank was a young Jewish girl who kept a record of the two years her family spent in hiding in Amsterdam to escape Nazi persecution. After their discovery by the Gestapo in 1944, the family was transported to concentration camps; Anne died of typhus at Bergen-Belsen. Friends searching the hiding place found her diary, which her father published as The Diary of a Young Girl (1947). Precocious in style and insight, it traces her emotional growth amid adversity and is a classic of war literature
Charles E and J Frank Duryea
born Dec. 15, 1861, Canton, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 28, 1938, Philadelphia, Pa. born Oct. 8, 1869, Washburn, Ill., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1967, Saybrook, Conn. U.S. automotive inventors. Charles initially worked as a bicycle mechanic. After seeing a gasoline engine at a state fair, he designed a gasoline-powered automobile, and in 1893 he and his brother Frank constructed the first U.S. automobile, which they drove successfully on the streets of Springfield, Mass. In Chicago in 1895, Frank drove an improved model to win the first U.S. auto race. In 1896 their company manufactured the first commercially produced U.S. automobiles; 13 cars were sold before the company failed and the brothers separated. Both started new automobile manufacturing ventures; Frank later developed the Stevens-Duryea limousine, which was produced into the 1920s
Charles Edgar and James Frank Duryea
born Dec. 15, 1861, Canton, Ill., U.S. died Sept. 28, 1938, Philadelphia, Pa. born Oct. 8, 1869, Washburn, Ill., U.S. died Feb. 15, 1967, Saybrook, Conn. U.S. automotive inventors. Charles initially worked as a bicycle mechanic. After seeing a gasoline engine at a state fair, he designed a gasoline-powered automobile, and in 1893 he and his brother Frank constructed the first U.S. automobile, which they drove successfully on the streets of Springfield, Mass. In Chicago in 1895, Frank drove an improved model to win the first U.S. auto race. In 1896 their company manufactured the first commercially produced U.S. automobiles; 13 cars were sold before the company failed and the brothers separated. Both started new automobile manufacturing ventures; Frank later developed the Stevens-Duryea limousine, which was produced into the 1920s
Diary of Anne Frank
the diary (=book in which you write down your thoughts, experiences etc each day) written by Anne Frank when she and her family were hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam during World War II. It was published after her death in a concentration camp, and it has been made into a play and film
Franks
plural of Frank
Ilya Frank
{i} (1908-1990) Soviet physicist, winner of the 1958 Nobel prize in Physics (together with Pavel Alekseyevich Cherenkov and Igor Yevgenyevich Tamm)
Jacob Frank
orig. Jacob Leibowicz born 1726, Berezanka or Korolowka, Galicia, Pol. died Dec. 10, 1791, Offenbach, Hessen Jewish false messiah. He was an uneducated visionary who claimed to be the reincarnation of Shabbetai Tzevi. He proclaimed himself messiah in 1751 and founded the Frankist, or Zoharist, sect, based on the Sefer ha-zohar, which he sought to put in the place of the Torah. The sect rejected traditional Judaism, and their practices, including orgiastic rites, led the Jewish community to excommunicate them in 1756. Protected by Roman Catholic authorities, who hoped Frank would help in the conversion of the Jews, Frank and his followers were baptized in Poland. In 1760 he was imprisoned by the Inquisition, who had realized that Frank's followers regarded Frank, not Jesus, as the messiah. Freed in 1773 by invading Russians, he settled in Germany and lived as a baron until his death
Jesse and James Frank James
in full Jesse Woodson James and Alexander Franklin James born Sept. 5, 1847, near Centerville, Mo., U.S. died April 3, 1882, St. Joseph, Mo. born Jan. 10, 1843, near Centerville, Mo. died Feb. 18, 1915, near Kearney, Mo. Brothers who were among the most notorious outlaws of the American West. Jesse and Frank both fought as Confederate guerrillas in the American Civil War. In 1866 they and eight other men robbed a bank in Liberty, Mo. Joined by other outlaws in subsequent years, the James gang robbed banks from Iowa to Alabama and Texas. In 1873 the bandits began robbing trains; they also preyed upon stagecoaches, stores, and individuals. In 1876 Jesse led a failed attempt to rob a bank in Northfield, Minn.; though the brothers escaped, the rest of the gang was killed or captured. After assembling a new gang in 1879 the brothers resumed robbing, and in 1881 the governor of Missouri offered a $10,000 reward for the brothers' capture, dead or alive. In 1882 Jesse was shot in the back of the head and killed instantly by Robert Ford, a gang member, who claimed the reward. A few months later, Frank gave himself up. Tried and acquitted three times, he retired to a quiet life on his family's farm. The exploits of the James brothers were romanticized in pulp fiction and in movies
L Frank Baum
born May 15, 1856, Chittenango, N.Y., U.S. died May 6, 1919, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. writer of children's books. Baum achieved commercial success with his first book, Father Goose (1899), and followed it the next year with the even more popular Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote 13 more Oz books, which acquired a huge readership. The series was continued by Ruth Plumly Thompson after his death
L. Frank Baum
a US writer who wrote the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1856-1919)
Lyman Frank Baum
{i} (1856-1919) American author of the children's series "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Lyman Frank Baum
born May 15, 1856, Chittenango, N.Y., U.S. died May 6, 1919, Hollywood, Calif. U.S. writer of children's books. Baum achieved commercial success with his first book, Father Goose (1899), and followed it the next year with the even more popular Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote 13 more Oz books, which acquired a huge readership. The series was continued by Ruth Plumly Thompson after his death
Robert Frank
born Nov. 9, 1924, Zürich, Switz. Swiss-born U.S. photographer. In the 1940s he worked as a fashion photographer for Harper's Bazaar in Paris. He abandoned fashion work in 1947 to travel in the U.S. and South America and explore the use of the 35-mm camera. His collection The Americans (1959), with its gritty, discordant images of 1950s America, had enormous influence and established him as a major figure. After 1959 Frank turned to filmmaking; his short film Pull My Daisy (1959), a collaboration with Jack Kerouac, became an underground classic. A major later collection is Robert Frank: Moving Out (1994)
Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet
born Sept. 3, 1899, Traralgon, Vic., Austl. died Aug. 31, 1985, Melbourne, Vic. Australian physician and virologist. Burnet received his medical degree from the University of Melbourne. He later discovered a method for identifying bacteria by the viruses (bacteriophages) that attack them, and he shared a 1960 Nobel Prize with Peter Medawar for the discovery of acquired immunological tolerance to tissue transplants. He was knighted in 1951
Sir Frank Whittle
born June 1, 1907, Coventry, Warwickshire, Eng. died Aug. 8, 1996, Columbia, Md., U.S. British aviation engineer and pilot who invented the jet engine. He obtained his first patent for a turbojet engine in 1930, and in 1936 he cofounded Power Jets Ltd. The outbreak of World War II spurred the British government to support Whittle's work, and the first jet-powered aircraft took off in 1941. He was knighted in 1948 and awarded the Order of Merit in 1986
Stanley Frank Musial
born Nov. 21, 1920, Donora, Pa., U.S. U.S. baseball player. Musial played his entire career for the St. Louis Cardinals (1941-63), starting as a pitcher but switching to the outfield and ultimately to first base. A left-handed batter, "Stan the Man" became one of the game's great hitters. His lifetime totals of hits (3,630), runs (1,949), and times at bat were second only to those of Ty Cobb, his total of runs batted in (1,951) was the fourth-highest of all time, and his total of extra-base hits (1,477) was only surpassed later by Hank Aaron. Popular among fans for his unfailing graciousness, he became a Cardinals executive after retirement
Willard Frank Libby
born Dec. 17, 1908, Grand Valley, Colo., U.S. died Sept. 8, 1980, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. chemist. He studied at the University of California at Berkeley and later taught there and at the University of Chicago and UCLA. With the Manhattan Project, he helped develop a method for separating uranium isotopes and showed that tritium is a product of cosmic radiation. In 1947 he and his students developed carbon-14 dating, which proved to be an extremely valuable tool for archaeology, anthropology, and earth science and earned him a 1960 Nobel Prize
William Frank Jr. Buckley
born Nov. 24, 1925, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. writer and editor. He attended Yale University, where he was chairman of the Yale Daily News. In 1955 founded the National Review; as editor in chief, he used the journal as a forum for his conservative views. His column "On the Right" was syndicated in 1962 and eventually appeared in more than 200 newspapers. From 1966 he hosted Firing Line, a weekly television interview program in which he often employed his wit and debating skills against ideological opponents. His books include God and Man at Yale (1951), Rumbles Left and Right (1963), and a series of spy novels
franked
past of frank
franker
Somebody or something which franks
franker
comparative of frank
frankest
superlative of frank
franking
A method of forming a joint at the intersection of window-sash bars, by cutting away only enough wood to show a miter
frankly
(used as intensives reflecting the speaker's attitude) it is sincerely the case that; "honestly, I don't believe it"; "candidly, I think she doesn't have a conscience"; "frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn"
frankly
In a frank manner; freely
frankly
honestly, openly, sincerely, straightforwardly
frankly
in a frank, open or (too) honest manner
frankly
emphasis You use frankly when you are expressing an opinion or feeling to emphasize that you mean what you are saying, especially when the person you are speaking to may not like it. `You don't give a damn about my feelings, do you.' --- `Quite frankly, I don't.' Frankly, Thomas, this question of your loan is beginning to worry me see also frank
frankness
{i} sincerity, honesty, openness
frankness
The quality of being frank; candor; openess; ingenuousness; fairness; liberality
frankness
The state of being frank; candour; honesty
frankness
the quality of being honest and straightforward in attitude and speech
frankness
the trait of being blunt and outspoken
franks
Germanic people settled to the east of the Rhine, who during the 5th century expanded into Belgium and northern France, and even parts of southern England (most notably Kent and the Isle of Wight) Under their great king Clovis the Franks occupied much of Gaul, and their kingdom expanded steadily, until in the time of Charlemagne it consisted of most of western Europe They gave their name to Frankia, and thus to France
franks
A Germanic tribe which conqured most of Gaul and eventually established a powerful state centered in what is modern France and Germany, but whose borders extended well beyind At times the Franks were active in the northwestern Balkans, and for a while were overlords over most of the Croatians
franks
plural of , frank
franks
third-person singular of frank
noun frank 3
a frankfurter
salian frank
a member of the tribe of Franks who settled in the Netherlands in the 4th century AD
Türkçe - İngilizce
franc

Franklin convinces France to help Americans. - Franklin Amerikalılara yardım etmesi için Fransa'yı ikna ediyor.

Franco's forces took control in Spain. - Franko'nun güçleri İspanya'da kontrolü ele geçirdi.

frank kavmine ait
Franconian
frank