domain

listen to the pronunciation of domain
İngilizce - Türkçe
nüfuz sahası
{i} alan

Bir ICANN alan bir DNS sunucusuna bir IP adresi belirtir. - An ICANN domain signifies an IP address to a DNS server.

Yeni bir alan adına nasıl kaydolacağımı anlayamıyorum. - I can't figure out how to register a new domain name.

çalışma alanı
(Bilgisayar) alıt
manyetik alan
nüfuz alanı
tapulu mal
ülke

Bazı ülkelerde, birinin kendi işini bile kamuya bırakamaması oldukça saçmadır. - It is rather ridiculous that, in some countries, a person cannot even release their own work into the public domain.

beylik arazi
bölge
mal

O kamu malı bir kitap mı? - Is that a public domain book?

ihtisas
{i} memleket
right of eminent domain istimlâk hakkı
arazi/alan
{i} domain
{i} ilgi alanı
nüfuz bölgesi
{i} çevre
{i} bilgi alanı; ilgi alanı: It's not in my domain. O benim alanım dışında
üIke
{i} muhit
{i} malikâne
{i} mülk

O kitap kamu mülkiyetinde mi? - Is that book in the public domain?

yüce hakimiyet
bölge, ortak kullanıcı veri tabanını paylaşan bir grup bilgisayar
bilgi alanı
etkinlik alanı
(Meteoroloji) yapay çevre
etki yöresi
domak
domain aggregate
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı topluluğu
domain controller
etki alanı denetleyicisi
domain model
(Askeri) alan modeli
domain name
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı adı
domain name server
alan adı sunucusu
domain name server
alan ad sunucusu
domain name system
(Bilgisayar) alan adı sistemi
domain name system
(Askeri) ana isim sistemi
domain names
(Bilgisayar) alan isimleri
domain of a function
bir işlevin tanım bölgesi
domain theory
(Fizik,Teknik) domen teorisi
domain tree
etki alanı ağacı
domain tree management
etki alanı ağacı yönetimi
domain theory
evlek kuramı
domain name service
etki alanı adı hizmeti
domain of
etki
domain specificity
Beliri bir alana (bilim alanı, düşünce alanı vs.) özgü olma durumu
domain theory
domen teorisi, evlek kuramı
domain admin
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı yöneticisi
domain administrator
etki alanı yöneticisi
domain administrator
(Etki) Alanı Yöneticisi
domain admins
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı yöneticileri
domain controller
(Etki) Alanı Denetleyicisi
domain dns name
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı dns adı
domain knowledge
ilgi alani bilgisi
domain local
(Bilgisayar) yerel etki alanı
domain mode
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı modu
domain name
Alan Adı
domain name resolver
etki alanı çözücüsü
domain name resolver
(DNR) (Etki) Alanı İsim Çözücüsü
domain name server
(DNS) Alan Adı Sunucusu
domain name server
Alan Adı Sistemi
domain of a function
bir islevin tanim bolgesi
domain of an equation
(Matematik) denklemin tanım bölgesi
domain of attraction
(Bilgisayar,Teknik) çekim yöresi
domain oriented
(Dilbilim) alan odaklı
domain policy
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı ilkesi
domain root
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı kökü
domain search order
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı arama düzeni
domain suffix
(Bilgisayar) alanı son eki
domain suffix
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı son eki
domain tree
(Etki) Alanı Ağacı
domain tree management
(Etki) Alanı Ağacı Yönetimi
domain tree manager
Etki Alanı Ağaç Yöneticisi
domain trust list
etki alanı güven listesi
domain trust list
(Etki) Alanı Güven Listesi
domain user
(Etki) Alanı Kullanıcısı
domain user
etki alanı kullanıcısı
domain\username
(Bilgisayar) etkialanı\kullanıcıadı
Cognitive domain
İdrak sahası, idrâk alanı
aerial domain
(Askeri) hava sahası
computer domain
(Bilgisayar) bilgisayar etki alanı
eminent domain
kamulaştırma
fully qualified domain name
tam nitelikli alan adı
fully qualified domain name
(Bilgisayar) tam tanımlanmış alan adı
host domain
(Bilgisayar) ana etki alanı
integral domain
(Matematik) tamlık bölgesi
join a domain
(Bilgisayar) etki alanına katıl
join domain
(Bilgisayar) etki alanına katıl
master of his domain
işinin ehli
network domain
(Bilgisayar) ağ yönetim bölgesi
other domain
(Bilgisayar) diğer etki alanı
parent domain
(Bilgisayar) ana etki alanı
proper domain
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) asli alan
recent domain
(Bilgisayar) son etki alanı
secure domain
(Bilgisayar) güvenli etki alanı
unique factorisation domain
(Matematik) tek çarpanlama bölgesi
complex domain
karmaşık bölge
cross domain
etki alanları arası
eminent domain
istimlak hakkı
integral domain
tamlık alanı
public domain
kamu arazisi
public domain software
telif haksız yazılım
eminent domain
Kamulaştırma yetkisi
farm domain
çiftlik alanı
frequency domain
(Elektrik, Elektronik) Frekans şıklık bölgesi, frekans ortamı
inter-domain
Alanlar arası
knowledge domain
bilgi alanı
multiple domain network
birden çok etki alanı ağ
public domain
Kamu mali
public domain programs
kamu mali programları
right of eminent domain
huk. istimlak hakkı
actual domain
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) fiili alan
actual domain
gerçek alan
administrative domain
Yönetsel Alan
affective domain
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) duygusal alan
affective domain
(Dilbilim) etkisel alan
backup domain controller
(BDC) Yedek Etki Alanı Denetleyicisi
child domain
(Bilgisayar) bağımlı etki alanı
child domain
Alt Etki Alanı
convex domain
(Matematik) dışbükey bölge
cookie domain
(Bilgisayar) tanım bilgisi etki alanı
detection domain
(Askeri) bulma sahası
find my domain
(Bilgisayar) etki alanımı bul
frequency domain
frekans (siklik) bolgesi
fully qualified domain name
(FQDN) Tam Nitelikli Alan Adı
internet domain names
ınternet alan adları
internet domain names
internet alan isimleri
invalid domain
(Bilgisayar) geçersiz etki alanı
master domain
Ana Etki Alanı
mixed mode domain
Karma Kipli Etki Alanı
multi domain
çoklu alan
multiple domain
çoklu alan
native mode domain
Yerli Kip Etki Alanı
network domain
ag yonetim bolgesi
object domain
Nesne Etki Alanı
parent domain
Üst Etki Alanı
peer domain
Eşin Etki Alanı
primary domain controller
Birincil Etki Alanı Denetleyicisi
public domain
halkın malı
public domain software
Serbest Yazılım
root domain
Kök Etki Alanı
routing domain
(Bilgisayar) yöneltim alanı
routing domain
(Bilgisayar) yönlendirme etki alanı
select domain
(Bilgisayar) etki alanı seç
single domain model
Tek Etki Alanı Modeli
this domain
(Bilgisayar) yandaki etki alanı
this domain
(Bilgisayar) bu etki alanı
this domain
(Bilgisayar) şu etki alanı
time domain
zaman bolgesi
trusted domain
Güvenilen Etki Alanı
trusting domain
Güvenen Etki Alanı
unknown domain
(Bilgisayar) bilinmeyen etki alanı
user domain
(Bilgisayar) kullanıcı etki alanı
windows nt domain
(Bilgisayar) windows nt etki alanı
İngilizce - İngilizce
A geographic area owned or controlled by a single person or organization
A group of related items, topics, or subjects
In the three-domain system, the highest rank in the classification of organisms, above kingdom; in other taxonomic systems, a similarly high rank
The collection of computers identified by a domain's domain names
In the three-domain system, one of three taxa at that rank: Bacteria, Archaea, or Eukaryota
A sphere of influence
The set of all possible mathematical entities (points) where a given function is defined
An open and connected set in some topology. For example, the interval (0,1) as a subset of the real numbers
Any DNS domain name, particularly one which has been delegated and has become representative of the delegated domain name and its subdomains

Every name in the DNS tree is a domain, even if it is terminal, that is, has no subdomains.

A collection of DNS or DNS-like domain names consisting of a delegated domain name and all its subdomains
A collection of information having to do with a domain, the computers named in the domain, and the network on which the computers named in the domain reside
a sphere or field of action or interest
{n} a possession, estate, dominion, power
The collection of computers identified by a domains domain names
territory over which rule or control is exercised; "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land"
Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne
A domain is a particular field of thought, activity, or interest, especially one over which someone has control, influence, or rights. the great experimenters in the domain of art
In the three-domain system, one of three taxa at that rank: (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryota)
On the Internet, a domain is a set of addresses that shows, for example, the category or geographical area that an Internet address belongs to
Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership
a knowledge domain that you are interested in or are communicating about; "it was a limited domain of discourse"; "here we enter the region of opinion"; "the realm of the occult"
Also used figuratively
Dominion; empire; authority
{i} field; sovereignty, autonomy; division of the Internet according to country and type of organization (Computers)
The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like
the set of values of the independent variable for which a function is defined
Domain Name System
The distributed database, sometimes including all the supporting hardware or software infrastructure, the Internet uses to translate hostnames into IP numbers and provide other domain related information

The purpose of this document is to explain the installation and upkeep of the BIND software package, and we begin by reviewing the fundamentals of the Domain Name System (DNS) as they relate to BIND. ... The Domain Name System (DNS) is the hierarchical, distributed database. It stores information for mapping Internet host names to IP addresses and vice versa, mail routing information, and other data used by Internet applications.

domain hack
An Internet domain name in which the TLD (such as a country code) can be understood as part of the name rather than the usual suffix

I love those domain hacks, I own http://www.web2.0button.com and I recently got an email asking how I registered a domain name with a dot in it (HEHE).

domain hacks
plural form of domain hack
domain name
an identifier of a computer or site on the Internet
domain name
a domain -- that part of a domain name which (nominally) identifies an organization; a domain name delegated to an independent administrative authority who is then responsible for the management of that portion of the Domain Name System's namespace that consist of the delegated domain and all subdomains that are not delegated in turn
domain name
a unique, case-insensitive, name, consisting of a string made up of alphanumeric characters and dashes separated by periods, that the Domain Name System maps to IP numbers and other information

RFC 822, P. Mockapetris, November 1983: This RFC introduces domain style names, their use for ARPA Internet mail and host address support, and the protocols and servers used to implement domain name facilities.

domain name server
A computer that provides domain name information to a network; a computer that is part of the Domain Name System
domain name service
A service provided by the Domain Name System
domain name services
plural form of domain name service
domain of discourse
In predicate logic, an indication of the relevant set of entities that are being dealt with by quantifiers
domain theory
A branch of mathematics that studies special kinds of partially ordered sets (posets) commonly called domains
domain wall
A two-dimensional singularity hypothesized in string theory

The simplest soliton is the domain wall with co-dimension one, and the next simplest is the vortex with co-dimension two, whereas the co-dimension three (four) soliton is called monopole (instanton).

domain wall
An interface separating magnetic domains

A domain wall corresponds to the rotation of the magnetization vector from one magnetic domain to another.

domain-specific language
A programming / specification language that is dedicated to a particular problem domain, a particular problem representation/solution technique
domain specificity
Domain-specificity is a theoretical position in cognitive science (especially modern cognitive development) that argues that many aspects of cognition are supported by specialized, presumably evolutionarily specified, learning devices. The position is a close relative of modularity of mind, but is considered more general in that it does not necessarily entail all the assumptions of Fodorian modularity (e.g. informational encapsulation), and is a variant of psychological nativism. Domain-specificity emerged in the aftermath of the cognitive revolution as a theoretical alternative to empiricist theories that believed all learning can be driven by the operation of a few such general learning devices. Prominent examples of such domain-general views include Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development, behaviorism, and the views of many modern connectionists. Proponents of domain-specificity argue that domain-general learning mechanisms are unable to overcome the epistemological problems facing learners in many domains, especially language. In addition, domain-specific accounts draw support from the surprising competencies of infants, who are able to reason about things like numerosity, goal-directed behavior, and the physical properties of objects all in the first months of life. Domain-specific theorists argue that these competencies are too sophisticated to have been learned via a domain-general process like associative learning, especially over such a short time and in the face of the infant’s perceptual, attentional, and motor deficits. Current proponents of domain specificity argue that evolution equipped humans (and indeed most other species) with specific adaptations designed to overcome persistent problems in the environment. For humans, popular candidates include reasoning about objects, other intentional agents, language, and number. Researchers in this field seek evidence for domain-specificity in a variety of ways. Some look for unique cognitive signatures thought to characterize a domain (e.g. differences in ways infants reason about inanimate versus animate entities). Others try to show selective impairment or competence within but not across domains (e.g. the increased ease of solving the Wason Selection Task when the content is social in nature). Still others use learnability arguments to argue that a cognitive process or specific cognitive content could not be learned, as in Chomsky’s poverty of the stimulus argument for language
Domain Name Service
Internet service which translates site names into their numerical addresses, DNS
domain name
{i} (Computers) series of words or abbreviations or phrases which identifies a specific computer connected to the Internet and serves as its address, alphabetic form for Internet address
domain name
The unique name that identifies an Internet site On the Web, the domain name is the part of the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that tells a domain name server where to forward a request for a Web page For example, the domain name of this web site is starrsites com
domain name
A unique name that represents each computer on the Internet (Some machines do have more than one domain name ) The DNS converts the domain name requested by an Internet user into an IP address
domain name
The unique name that identifies an Internet site Domain Names always have 2 or more parts separated by dots The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general A given machine might have more than one Domain Name, but a given Domain Name points to only one machine Usually, all of the machines on a given network will have the same suffix as the right-hand portion of their Domain Names, e g , gateway gbnetwork com,mail gbnetwork com, www gbnetwork com, and so on It is also possible for a Domain Name to exist but not be connected to an actual machine This is often done so that a group or business can have an Internet e-mail address without having to establish a real Internet site In these cases, some real Internet machine must handle the mail on behalf of the listed Domain Name See also: IP Number
domain name
Domain names are the alphabetic names used to refer to computers on the Internet A Web site address, including a suffix such as com, org, gov, or edu The suffix indicates what type of organization is hosting the site com - Originally stood for "commercial," to indicate a site that could be sued for private, commercial purposes, but now the best well known top level domain, and used for a wide variety of sites net - Originally intended for site related to the Internet itself, but now used for a wide variety of sites edu - Use for educational institutions like universities org - Originally intended for non-commercial "organizations," but organizations now used for a wide variety of sites gov - Used for US Government sites mil - Used for US Military sites int - Used by "International" sites, usually NATO sites (See also "URL")
domain name
A name that identifies one or more IP addresses For example, the uiuc edu domain is used by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Within that domain are distinct hostnames (such as argus cites uiuc edu) that point to individual computers on the campus network [Alternate: In the URL http: //www cites uiuc edu/, the domain name is uiuc edu ] See Also: Domain Name Service, Hostname, IP Address
domain name
An addressing construct used for identifying and locating computers on the Internet Domain names provide a system of easy-to-remember Internet addresses, which can be translated by the Domain Name System (DNS) into the numeric addresses (Internet Protocol (IP) numbers) used by the network A domain name is hierarchical and often conveys information about the type of entity using the domain name A domain name is simply a label that represents a domain, which is a subset of the total domain name space Domain names at the same level of the hierarchy must be unique Thus, for example, there can be only one COM at the top-level of the hierarchy, and only one networksolutions com at the next level of the hierarchy
domain name
The unique name that identifies an Internet site Domain names always have two or more parts, separated by dots The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general A given machine may have more than one domain name but a given domain name points to only one machine
domain name
This is the unique name that identifies an Internet site Domain Names always have at least two parts, which are separated by dots (for instance lsoft com) The part on the left is specific whereas the part on the right is more general
domain name
The unique name that identifies an Internet site Domain Names always have 2 or more parts, separated by dots The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general A given machine may have more than one Domain Name but a given Domain Name points to only one machine For example, the domain names: matisse net mail matisse net workshop matisse net can all refer to the same machine, but each domain name can refer to no more than one machine Usually, all of the machines on a given Network will have the same thing as the right-hand portion of their Domain Names (matisse net in the examples above) It is also possible for a Domain Name to exist but not be connected to an actual machine This is often done so that a group or business can have an Internet e-mail address without having to establish a real Internet site In these cases, some real Internet machine must handle the mail on behalf of the listed Domain Name See also: IP Number, TLD
domain name
A domain name is the name of a person's or organization's website on the Internet, for example `cobuild.collins.co.uk'. Is the domain name already registered or still available?. A series of alphanumeric strings separated by periods, such as www.hmco.com, that is an address of a computer network connection and that identifies the owner of the address. the first part of a website's address, which usually begins with 'www.' and ends with '.com', '.org', '.uk', or other letters that show which country the website is from. Address of a computer, organization, or other entity on a TCP/IP network such as the Internet. Domain names are typically in a three-level "server.organization.type" format. The top level denotes the type of organization, such as "com" (for commercial sites) or "edu" (for educational sites); the second level is the top level plus the name of the organization (e.g., "britannica.com" for Encyclopædia Britannica); and the third level identifies a specific host server at the address, such as the "www" (World Wide Web) host server for "www.britannica.com". A domain name is ultimately mapped to an IP address, but two or more domain names can be mapped to the same IP address. A domain name must be unique on the Internet, and must be assigned by a registrar accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). See also URL
domain name
strings of letters used to name organizations and computers and addresses on the internet; "domain names are organized hierarchically with the more generic parts to the right
domain name server
server which translates sites name into their numerical addresses, Internet server which provides domain name services
domain names
The domain name identifies the site you are visiting The domain name usually consists of the name of the organisation, or an abbreviation of it, and the type of organisation that it is For instance, "bnz co nz" tells us that there is a domain name, called "bnz", that is a registered business ( co), that is probably located in New Zealand ( nz)
domain names
the names used on the Internet as part of a distributed database system for translating computer names into physical addresses and vice versa
domain names
All servers on the Internet have a TCP-IP address that consists of a set of four numbers like 124 32 9 76 By assigning a name to the TCP-IP address - or vice versa - the Web becomes easier to use URL addresses (domain names) are obtainable from many sources Anyone can own a domain name The real quest is finding one no one owns yet
domain names
A domain name tells you the name of the specific computer you have accessed on the Internet For example, the domain name of the WWW server I use is www srl rmit edu au There are various levels to the domain The two worth noting are the last two levels In the example above, this would be edu au edu tells us what class the host computer is For example : edu - educational com - commercial gov - government org - non-profit organisation net - public network au tells us what country the host computer is in For example : at - Austria au - Australia ca - Canada ch - Switzerland de- Germany es - Spain fi - Finland il - Israel it - Italy jp - Japan kr - Korea se - Sweden tw - Taiwan uk - United Kingdom us - United States Note that if there is no two letter code at the end, the host computer is in the United States
domain names
A 2nd level name given to a host computer on the Internet (i e pdnt com)
domain names
A name given to a host computer on the Internet E-mail names are good examples of domain names (i e , [email protected] net)
domain names
Part of a Host's address / URL A name that identifies one or more IP addresses For example, the domain name microsoft com represents about a dozen IP addresses Domain names are used in URLs to identify particular Web pages
domain names
are the unique name that identifies an Internet site Domain Names always have 2 or more parts, separated by dots The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general A given machine may have more than one Domain Name but a given Domain Name points to only one machine Usually, all of the machines on a given Network will have the same thing as the right-hand portion of their Domain Names It is also possible for a Domain Name to exist but not be connected to an actual machine This is often done so that a group or business can have an Internet e-mail address without having to establish a real Internet site In these cases, some real Internet machine must handle the mail on behalf of the listed Domain Name (See http: //www matisse net/files/glossary html)
domain names
The names and words that companies designate for their registered Internet Web site addresses, such as the "Forbes" name in the URL http: //www forbes com Trademark disputes arise when more than one company tries to use the same domain name, or one company appropriates another company's brand or product name for its URL
domain names
The part of the Web address that sits between the http: // and co uk or com These can be registered for a minimal fee from many Web sites
domain names
A name given to a host computer on the Internet E-mail names are good examples of domain names (i e , [email protected] com)
domain names
Domain names identify the host computer or server on the Internet that has the information you want to access (e g www fsu edu) See Netscape Navigator: URLs handout available at the Strozier Library Reference Desk for more information
domain names
The host's name Examples are: www yahoo com, www cnn com
domain names
This is the address or locations assigned to your website so that Internet users can easily find your website It is usually your business or brand name such as yourname co nz or starthere co nz
domain names
Traffic derived from 404 "Page not found" errors
domain names
A domain name is simply an internet address The domain name in these examples is jcn com which is to the right of the "@" sign in an email address: "[email protected] com" In a web page address, the domain name is at the beginning of the page address (URL) as in: "http: //www jcn com/gloss html" Deciding whether or not your company wants a domain name is one of the first steps in getting on the internet If you don't want a domain name, then your email address with JCN could be "[email protected] com" If you do choose to have a domain name, then your email address could be "[email protected] com" For a little more info on domain names go to JCN's beginner's FAQ The time taken to process a domain names varies greatly from week to week Currently new " com" names are taking less than 1-2 weeks
application domain
An isolated context, with its own virtual address space, in which an application runs, analogous to a process in an operating system

All managed code in the .NET Framework needs to run within an application domain.

eminent domain
The right of a government over the lands within its jurisdiction. Usually invoked to compel land owners to sell their property in preparation for a major construction project such as a freeway
generic top-level domain
Any of the top-level domains assigned by the IANA based on type of organization

com, .gov and .edu are all generic top-level domains.

integral domain
A commutative ring with identity not equal to zero which has no zero divisors

Ring R is an integral domain if and only if the polynomial ring R is an integral domain.

principal ideal domain
An integral domain in which every ideal is a principal ideal
protein domain
A part of protein sequence and structure that can evolve, function, and exist independently of the rest of the protein chain
public domain
Not subject to any copyright or patent restrictions
public domain
Information about a subject which is accessible to anyone

There is very little information about the treaty which is in the public domain..

public domain
Open land such as unowned prairie in the western and southwestern United States. Space not subject to a land patent
public domain
The feature of intellectual property being not protected under patent or copyright, i.e. no person or other legal entity can establish proprietary interests

This book is in public domain.

second-level domain
a domain name that contains a single period
second-level domain
a domain that is immediately below a top-level domain

Wiktionary.org is a second-level domain.

source domain
Within a conceptual metaphor, the conceptual domain from which we draw metaphorical expressions
synchronization domain
In the context of thread synchronization, a collection of contexts and objects that share a single lock
target domain
Within a conceptual metaphor, the conceptual domain that we try to understand in terms of source domain
time domain
The set of values, representing time, over which a function dependent on time is defined
top-level domain
The last component of a domain name, such as .com, .edu, .gov, .net, .org, .mil or any of the newer generic top-level domains, or any of the ccTLDs. Abbreviated TLD
value domain
The set of allowed values for a data element
Backup Domain Controller
{i} (Windows NT) BDC, server that keeps a copy of user accounts database
child domain
For DNS and Active Directory, a domain located in the namespace tree directly beneath another domain name (its parent domain) For example, example reskit com is a child domain of the parent domain, reskit com A child domain is also called a subdomain See also: parent domain, directory partition, domain
child domain
A Win2K domain whose DNS name is subordinate to another domain For example, research mycompany com is a child domain of mycompany com Also called a subdomain
child domain
For DNS and Active Directory, a domain located in the namespace tree directly beneath another domain name (its parent domain) For example, "example reskit com" is a child domain of the parent domain, "reskit com" Child domain is also called subdomain See also directory partition; domain; parent domain
domains
Sometimes people who want to create a domain are interested in setting up a web site Interestingly enough, a domain does not point to a web page! A domain is more like a collection of computers A specific domain name (for example, www domain org) only points to an IP address The server that owns that IP address must be configured to serve the proper pages
domains
com au $79/2y net au
domains
A logical tree-structure naming convention to provide unique names for computers on the Internet (and other networks)
domains
A domain is a specific virtual area within the Internet, defined by the "top level" of the address or URL (Uniform Resource Locator) The top level is the end of the address; example: "whitehouse gov" In this example, the top-level part of the domain is " gov", indicating a US government entity The "whitehouse" part is the second-level domain, indicating where within the " gov" domain the information in question is to be found Other common top-level domains include " com", " net", " uk", etc
domains
Groups of grains that have the same CPO and/or SPO
domains
plural of domain
domains
Domains are areas of interest or areas to be managed They are relatively arbitrary, but suggested domains include the organization, infrastructure, applications, and data
domains
sequences or regions in block copolymers
eminent domain
The right of a body of government (often a state) to expropriate private property, while paying appropriate compensation to the owner
eminent domain
The power of the state to take private porperty for public use upon payment of just compensation The right of a governmental entity or other agency authorized by law to take private property for public use upon the payment or just compensation The legal proceeding by which the government exercises this right is called "condenmation proceedings " The right of the government to do this, and the right of the private citizen to get paid, are set out in the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution
eminent domain
Process of governmental entity taking title to private property for public purposes
eminent domain
The power of the state to take private property for public use upon payment of just compensation
eminent domain
The right of a government to seize private property for public use upon payment of its fair market value Eminent domain is the legal basis for condemnation proceedings
eminent domain
The right of government to take private property for public use, through court action known as condemnation The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution allows the government to take private property if the taking is for a public use and the owner is "justly compensated" (usually, paid fair market value) for his or her loss A public use is virtually anything that is sanctioned by a federal or state legislative body, but such uses may include roads, parks, reservoirs, schools, hospitals or other public buildings Sometimes called expropriation
eminent domain
- The right of government to "take" private property at fair market value for a public purpose
eminent domain
The right of the government to acquire property for necessary public or quasi-public use by condemnation
eminent domain
The right of a government to take privately owned property for the public purposes under condemnation proceedings subject to payment of its fair market value
eminent domain
the right of the state to take private property for public use; the Fifth Amendment that was added to the Constitution of the United States requires that just compensation be made
eminent domain
The right of a government to take privately owned property for public purposes under condemnation proceedings upon payment of its reasonable value See Condemnation
eminent domain
The authority of the government (local, State, or Federal) to take private property for public use upon making just compensation
eminent domain
The power of the government to take private property for public use through condemnation
eminent domain
right of a government to appropriate private property for public use
eminent domain
The right of a government to take private property for public use upon payment of its fair market value Eminent domain is the basis for condemnation proceedings
eminent domain
The government right to take private property for public use depended on the payment of its fair market value
eminent domain
The right of the government to acquire private property for public use by condemnation The owner must be compensated fully
eminent domain
The right of the state to take private property for public use after giving fair compensation to the owner
eminent domain
The government's right to condemn and acquire property for public use The government must provide the owner fair compensation
eminent domain
The right of a government authority to take private property for public use and paying fair compensation to the owner
eminent domain
The right of a government to take privately owned property for public purposes under condemnation proceedings subject to payment of its fair market value
eminent domain
The right of the government or a public utility to acquire property for necessary public use by condemnation, with proper compensation to the owner
eminent domain
- The right of a government to take privately owned property for public purposes under condemnation proceedings subject to payment of its fair market value
eminent domain
The right of the state to take private property for public use and provide fair compensation to the owner
eminent domain
A Government right to acquire private property for public use by condemnation, and the payment of just compensation
eminent domain
A power of the state, municipalities, and private persons or corporations authorized to exercise functions of public character to acquire private property for public use by condemnation, in return for just compensation See also "Condemnation"
eminent domain
The right of a government to appropriate private property for public use, usually with compensation to the owner. the right of the US government to take private land for public use. Government power to take private property for public use without the owner's consent. Constitutional provisions in most countries, including the U.S. (in the 5th Amendment to the Constitution), require the payment of just compensation to the owner. As a power peculiar to sovereign authority and coupled with a duty to pay compensation, the concept was developed by such 17th-century natural-law jurists as Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf. See also confiscation
integral domain
A commutative ring with identity having no proper divisors of zero, that is, where the product of nonzero elements cannot be zero
knowledge domain
the content of a particular domain or field of knowledge
private domain
individual domain, private authority
public domain
The territory ceded to the Federal government by the original thirteen states, plus additions by treaty, cession, purchase and theft
public domain
Works which are no longer owned by anyone because the creator has been dead a certain amount of time and, therefore, the work is no longer protected by copyright law (Unit 8> Giving Credit Where Credit is Due)
public domain
Software that you can use freely, distribute freely, and modify in any way you wish
public domain
Land owned by the government and belonging to the community at large
public domain
Of all the kinds of software or information you can download, public domain had the fewest strings attached With public domain downloads, there are no copyright restrictions whatsoever
public domain
land owned by a government
public domain
The territory ceded to the Federal government by the original thirteen states, plus additions by treaty, cession, and purchase
public domain
The territory ceded to the Federal government by the original thirteen states, plus additions by treaty cession, and purchase
public domain
If information is in the public domain, it is not secret and can be used or discussed by anyone. It is outrageous that the figures are not in the public domain. something that is in the public domain is available for anyone to have or use
public domain
Software that is free to be used, distributed or modified It has been given up to the public free of copyright infringement
public domain
Any material that can be freely used by the public, and does not come under the protection of a copyright, trademark, or patent
public domain
public land; lands that belong to the government; creative works that are available for public use because they are not copyrighted or patented
public domain
A term which is often used to refer to computer software for which the author has released rights to the general public Such software may be used freely without licensing or fees See also: shareware
public domain
Information in the public domain is open for free use by the public, so public domain software can be copied, modified and redistributed free of charge and restriction Other information can also be in the public domain, such as books, music and documentation
public domain
These are things that are available to the public at no charge because their copyrights, trademarks or patents have expired or somehow, been nullified This may include information on government sites This does not include information that is publicly visible on private or commercial websites Just because it's there, does not mean you may copy it for your own site or publications without permission from the copyright holder
public domain
Not copyrighted, either because it never was or because the copyright has expired or lapsed; public domain material can be used without attribution or permission, though good writing practice means making a note of sources
public domain
Intellectual property, including software, Web documents, images etc that are not protected by copyright or patent regulations and are freely available for use by anyone
public domain
Any work that is not covered by copyright registration is considered to be in the public domain This includes works created before 1922, created for public use, or those works that have over the years fallen into public domain because the copyright expired This includes documents of the United States government, unless stated otherwise
public domain
Information or software freely available to the public Could be freeware, shareware, or donationware
public domain
property rights that are held by the public at large
public domain
Software which has been entered into the public domain The author has given up all rights to the software You may sell it, modify it, redistribute it, burn it, and so on You can do anything you want to the software (except copyright it, since it is "PD") Once software has entered the public domain, it cannot go back It is forever free HOWEVER, if a new version is released (updates, etc ), then the status may be changed A simple change in something like the name or author may not be enough, but changes or upgrades in functionality usually are This type of software is usually the only type in which the author gives up his or her rights For the other types of software here, the author usually retains full rights, including copyright, unless otherwise noted by the author
public domain
Computer software on which no copyright exists (usually by a specific statement to that effect by the author), and which may be freely used and distributed
public domain
A kind of software which is made freely available, with no copyright restrictions, by the developer In the early days of computers, most software developed was put into the "public domain", as different programmers would develop some utility they considered useful, and make it freely available to others, with the assumption that others would reciprocate Related concepts are freeware and open source
public domain
A work is said to be in the public domain if it is not protected by copyright, or if the copyright for it has expired
public domain
any work that is not copyright protected is considered to be in the "public domain", and includes materials created prior to 1922, works created for public use, government documents unless otherwise specified, and works whose copyright has expired
public domain
Implies that the source code for a software product can be freely distributed and modified Oftentimes, a notice must be retained in the product indicating that the original source code was public domain, and, in some cases, cannot be sold for profit The author of the code also generally requests that his name be carried around in any modified code
public domain
The status of a particular graphic, writing or software wherein the item is legally and morally within the right for anyone to use by virtue of source declaration, limited license or a particular degree of conversion whereby the item was made legally different from the original Public domain software is typically called "freeware" (See also: clip art)
public domain program
computer program which can be used freely by the public, free computer program
public domain programs
programs marketed to the public for free and without copyright
public domain software
Software that is freely, distributed to anyone who wants to use,copy, or distribute it
public domain software
Software that is free and not copyrighted
public domain software
Shareware programs that are free to use and modify, as the author has relinquished control over the code
public domain software
software marketed to the public for free and without copyright
public domain software
is software that you can copy, distribute, and even modify without obtaining permission
public domain software
This is like freeware, but it is not copyrighted, so you may modify it and distribute it free
public domain software
The best things in life are free Well, maybe--at least when it comes to software The good news is that you can copy, alter and distribute public domain software Just don't get it confused with freeware, which is distributed at no charge by the software author who retains the copyright, or shareware, which is available though a free trial download before you pay any fees
public domain software
Software programs which are not owned by anyone that you can freely use and distribute
public domain software
Software that is not covered by any kind of copyright and may be legally copied
public domain software
This is software that has no copy rights - and can be used and modified without permission or payment
public domain software
Free software that is not copyrighted, offered through World Wide Web sites, electronic bulletin boards, user groups, and other sources
public domain software
Computer programs used, downloaded, and distributed without paying a fee Also known as shareware, it is distributed at no cost The user is eventually expected to pay a fee once he/she has decided to keep and use it
public domain software
Programs created and then shared at no cost with other users There are frequently no copyright or restrictions on the use of the program
public domain software
The author gives her rights to the community
public domain software
Software available for minimal or no charge Listings of public domain software can be found by contacting local and regional user groups, in many libraries, in national exchanges, and by contacting many of the resources listed in this publication
public domain software
Software: in the early years of personal computers many developers produced useful computer products simply for the pleasure of doing so As they didn't want to be bothered with commercial distribution they put the products into the public domain, allowing the software to be distributed without cost Today there is almost no software distributed in this manner and computer users should be prepared to pay for the software they use Return to top of glossary
public domain software
Any non-copyrighted program; this software is free and can be used without restriction Often confused with "freeware" (free software that is copyrighted by the author)
sub-domain
A partition within a domain name, usually a third level domain name
sub-domain
An alternate domain name that INCLUDES your purchased domain name EX tom paperclip com  
sub-domain
Generally used to refer to a host name immediately under a second-level domain such as host1 domain com and host2 domain com
sub-domain
A domain that is a member of another domain, i e a proper subset of a domain For the purposes of this site and the research at Western, we are interested in subdomains that are part of a management domain
sub-domain
A Sub-Domain is a name assigned to a Web Site that is under a Domain It can only be found on the Internet by passing through the Domain Name Many of Today's Village residents are a Sub-Domain A Sub-Domain address has the form: www TodaysVillage com/subdomainname A Sub-Domain does not have to be registered with InterNIC
time domain
Signals displayed with time on the X-axis and amplitude on the Y-axis Instruments which display signals in this format are called time domain instruments
time domain
Variation of a time series is accounted for by an autocorrelation function and other time series
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domain
domain