leap

listen to the pronunciation of leap
Englisch - Türkisch
sıçramak

Cennetin en hızlı yolu derin bir uçurumun içine sıçramaktır. - The fastest way to heaven is a leap into a deep abyss.

sıçratmak
atlamak
(Askeri) Hafif Atmosfer Dışı Atış (Light ExoAtmospheric Projectile)
{f} üzerinden atlamak
{i} sekme
{f} zıplamak
{i} atlanılan yer
ani yükselme
{i} atlanılan uzaklık
atılım,v.sıçra: n.sıçrama
{f} sekmek
atlayıp öte tarafa geçmek
sıçrama uzaklığı
atlayış
artış
(üstünden) atlamak
{f} sıçra

Bu, bir kişi için küçük bir adımdır ama insanlık için dev bir sıçramadır. - That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.

Tom koltuğundan sıçradı. - Tom leaped from his seat.

sıçrama

Bu, bir kişi için küçük bir adımdır ama insanlık için dev bir sıçramadır. - That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

Sıçramadan önce düşün. - Think before you leap.

tullanmak
atlama
fırlama
uzağa ya da yükseğe zıplamak. A dolphin leapt out of the water
çabucak hareket etmek
Birden sayıca artmak
fırlatmak
leapfro
leap sıçra
hoplamak
atılım
atılmak
leap at
(Dilbilim) sıçramak
leap at
(Dilbilim) zıplamak
leap day
29 şubat
leap day
artıkgün
leap at
bayıla bayıla kabul etmek
leap at
atlamak
leap out
dışarı fırla
leap year
artık yıl

Bir artık yılda kaç gün vardır? - How many days does a leap year have?

Artık yıllar dışında şubat sadece 28 gün çeker. - Except for leap years, February has only 28 days.

leap year
artıkyıl
leap year
ekliyıl
leap down from
bir yerden atlamak
leap forward
ileri atılım
leap into
Üstüne bir şeyler giyinmek

I had to leap into my clothes.

leap into the breach
(deyim) İmdada yetişmek
leap of faith
1. Birine veya bir şeye, gözleme ve deneye dayanan bir kanıt olmamasına rağmen inanma. 2. Hristiyanlıkta Adem aleyhisselam'ın günah işlemesi
leap of faith
inanç sıçrama
leap second
Artık saniye: Dünyanın dönüşündeki yavaşlamadan kaynaklanan, dünyanın dönüşü ve atomik saatler arasında ortaya çıkan zaman farkı
leap to
atlamak için
leap to conclusion
Leap to conclusion(s): Alelacele yargı ya da yargılara varmak
leap to conclusions
(deyim) İhtimalleri dikkate almadan kanıda bulunmak
leap year
Artık yıl, 4 yılda bir Şubat ayının 29 çektiği yıl
leap-frog
sıçramak-kurbağa
leap at
üzerine atlamak
leap at
havada kapmak
leap for joy
(Fiili Deyim ) sevinçten etekleri zil çalmak
leap for joy
sevinçten havalara uçmak
leap in the dark
(deyim) tehlikeli tesebbus ,kafadan atma (cevabi)
leap in the dark
tehlikeli girişim
leap in the dark
sonu belirsiz iş
leap in the dark
sonu belirsiz atılım
leap out
göze çarpmak
leap out of the bed
yataktan kalkmak
leap over
üzerinden atlamak
leap to the eye
göze çarpmak
leap up
birden yükselmek
leap up
(deyim) oturduğu yerden sıçramak
leap up
(deyim) yerinden fırlamak
leap up
sıçramak
leap up
(deyim) üzerinde sıçramak
leap up
fırlamak
leap up
(deyim) üstüne sıçramak
leap year
(Kanun) kebise sene
leap year
artık sene
Look before you leap
Başlamadan/Hareket etmeden önce iyice düşün!
leaping
sekme
leaped
{f} sıçra

Tom, Mary'ye sıçradı ve onu boğmaya çalıştı. - Tom leaped at Mary and tried to strangle her.

Tom koltuğundan sıçradı. - Tom leaped from his seat.

leaper
fırlatıcı
leapt
{f} sıçra

Köpek sıçradı ve havada diski yakaladı. - The dog leapt and caught the disk in midair.

a leap
bir sıçrama
great leap forward
büyük sıçrama
great-leap-forward
büyük sıçrama ilet
jump, leap, jerk
atlama, sıçrama, pislik
leaped
sıçrayan
leapt
sıçradı

Köpek sıçradı ve havada diski yakaladı. - The dog leapt and caught the disk in midair.

quantum leap
büyük ve önemli bir atılım
a leap in the dark
körü körüne işe atılma
a leap in the dark
cüretli atak
leapt
leap sıçra
leapt
f., bak. leap
quantum leap
önemli bir atılım
Englisch - Englisch
The distance traversed by a leap or jump
Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol
A significant move forward

That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

The act of leaping or jumping
To jump from one location to another

It is better to leap into the void.

A leap is a large and important change, increase, or advance. The result has been a giant leap in productivity. the leap in the unemployed from 35,000 to 75,000 Contemporary art has taken a huge leap forward in the last five or six years
If you leap, you jump high in the air or jump a long distance. He had leapt from a window in the building and escaped The man threw his arms out as he leapt. = jump Leap is also a noun. Smith took Britain's fifth medal of the championships with a leap of 2.37 metres
If a vehicle leaps somewhere, it moves there in a short sudden movement. The car leapt forward
{v} to jump, start, rush, compress as beasts
{n} a jump, skip, embace of animals, trap
pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion
pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion"
Long-Term Equity Anticipation Security LEAPs are long term equity options and normally expire in two to five years
A weel or wicker trap for fish
A leap is any place where a player must leap over something, be it a structure or a lack thereof, to keep going Of course, when executed, a player may say something in essence of "Did you see me just do that crazy jump over there?"
A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals
A transfer of weight from one foot to the other Push off with a spring and land on the ball of the other foot, letting the heel come down Bend knee to absorb the shock
jump (bid), especially more than a minimum jump
move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"
{f} jump, hop, lunge, spring into the air; move suddenly, act quickly
a sudden and decisive increase; "a jump in attendance"
-Lightweight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile
A LEAP is a long-term option contract for a company's stock They usually run for one year or more and are available on several U S exchanges
an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues"
To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch
A fault
Local Education Assistance Program- HS students tutor students at the Jr High
Also Fig
The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound
Legislative Evaluation & Accountability Program Committee
a light springing movement upwards or forwards
Lightweight Extensible Agent Platform
British English usually uses the form leapt as the past tense and past participle. American English usually uses leaped
the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet"
Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast
To copulate with (a female beast); to cover
If you leap to a particular place or position, you make a large and important change, increase, or advance. Warwicks leap to third in the table, 31 points behind leaders Essex
If you leap at a chance or opportunity, you accept it quickly and eagerly. The post of principal of the theatre school became vacant and he leapt at the chance. = jump
To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch
To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly
a light springing movement upwards or forwards the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet" an abrupt transition; "a successful leap from college to the major leagues" pass abruptly from one state or topic to another; "leap into fame"; "jump to a conclusion
Leveraging Educational Assistance Program, a federal grant matched by state funds
If you leap somewhere, you move there suddenly and quickly. The two men leaped into the jeep and roared off With a terrible howl, he leapt forward and threw himself into the water
Local Environmental Action Plan (Environment Agency)
Limited Examination and Appointment Program In this program, a selection process is used to enhance employment opportunities in civil service for persons with physical or mental disabilities as defined under any of the five goal setting categories: visual, hearing, speech, physical, or developmental disabilities
cause to jump or leap; "the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop"
Light Extensible Authentication Protocol
To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse
{i} act of jumping, lunge, spring; distance jumped; sudden change, abrupt transition
LEAP method is ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent) assays that use antibodies that are sensitive to latex proteins to quantitatively measure the level of antigenic proteins in latex extracts The antibodies IgG are generated from rabbits that are immunized with purified latex protein
emphasis You can use in leaps and bounds or by leaps and bounds to emphasize that someone or something is improving or increasing quickly and greatly. He's improved in leaps and bounds this season The total number of species on the planet appears to be growing by leaps and bounds
A basket
Lightweight & Efficient Application Protocol An open datagram protocol designed for mobile phones LEAP is a 'push' protocol, designed for SMS-like applications
(10) - Pokémon with this attack: Misty's Magikarp L5
a light springing movement upwards or forwards the distance leaped (or to be leaped); "a leap of 10 feet"
Spring into the air from one foot to land on the other foot
The movement of a single musical line by more than a second at a time
leap day
The extra day (February 29) in a leap year
leap days
plural form of leap day
leap frog
A children's game of lining up, squatting down on all fours, with the person last in line then leaping over each of the others in turn, like a frog and squatting down when at the front of the line
leap in the dark
shot in the dark
leap of faith
The act of believing in something, despite lack of proof of its truth or existence
leap second
A second of time added to the year occasionally to compensate for variation in the rate of Earth's rotation relative to the absolute standards of time
leap seconds
plural form of leap second
leap year
In the Gregorian calendar, a year having 366 days instead of the usual 365, with the extra day added to compensate for the fact that the Earth rotates approximately 365.25 times for each revolution it makes around the Sun
leap year
In the Jewish calendar or other lunisolar calendars, a year having 13 months instead of 12, with the extra month added because 19 solar years is approximately 19*12+7 lunar months
leap years
plural form of leap year
leap-of-faith
Attributive form of leap of faith, noun
leap-year
Attributive form of leap year, noun

Stateside, a presidential election is a leap-year event.

leap of faith
If you take a leap of faith, you do something even though you are not sure it is right or will succeed. Take a leap of faith and trust them
leap of faith
A leap of faith, in its most commonly used meaning, is the act of believing in or accepting something intangible or unprovable, or without empirical evidence. It is an act commonly associated with religious belief as many religions consider faith to be an essential element of piety, as well as scientists who take a great leap of faith when a new Idea is thought of, as well as the believing in the unprovable and the theoretical
leap second
A leap second is an intercalary, one-second adjustment that keeps broadcast standards for time of day close to mean solar time. Broadcast standards for civil time are based on Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), a time standard which is maintained using extremely precise atomic clocks. To keep the UTC broadcast standard close to mean solar time, UTC is occasionally corrected by an intercalary adjustment, or "leap", of one (1) second. Over long time periods, leap seconds must be added at an ever increasing rate (see ΔT). The name is based on the term "leap years", though in doing so it is a little inconsistent: leap seconds result in an extra second, while leap years result in an extra day, not an extra year
leap to conclusion
Leap to conclusion(s): Make a hasty judgement or judgements before considering all the facts
leap to conclusions
(deyim) Judge or decide something without having all the facts; to reach unwarranted conclusions

Please find out all the facts so you won't leap to conclusions.

leap year
A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing one or more extra days (or, in case of lunisolar calendars, an extra month) in order to keep the calendar year synchronised with the astronomical or seasonal year. For example, February would have 29 days in a leap year instead of the usual 28. Seasons and astronomical events do not repeat at an exact number of full days, so a calendar which had the same number of days in each year would over time drift with respect to the event it was supposed to track. By occasionally inserting (or intercalating) an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year which is not a leap year is called a common year. In fact, the Earth takes slightly under 365 1/4 days to revolve around the Sun
leap at the opportunity
take advantage of an opportunity, seize the chance
leap day
the name of the day that is added during a leap year
leap forward
jump towards the front; forward progress
leap in the dark
jumping into the unknown, entering an unfamiliar situation
leap out
be highly noticeable
leap out
jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone); "The attackers leapt out from the bushes"
leap second
a second (as measured by an atomic clock) added to or subtracted from Greenwich Mean Time in order to compensate for slowing in the Earth's rotation
leap second
A second of time, as measured by an atomic clock, added to or omitted from official timekeeping systems annually to compensate for changes in the rotation of the earth
leap year
High jumpers should do well at the Olympics because it's always on a leap year
leap year
year that has 366 days (as opposed to 365)
leap year
In the Gregorian calendar, a leap year is any year which number can be divided by 4 without a remainder, and years ending in hundreds are no leap years unless they are divisible by 400 But the Eastern Orthodox churches compute leap years within the Gregorian calendar by using another rule; and that, a leap year is any year which number can be divided by 4 without a remainder, and years ending in hundreds are leap years, if a remainder of 2 or 6 occurs when such a year is divided by 9
leap year
A calendar year containing 366 days (see Gregorian calendar)
leap year
A calendar year with 366 days, inserted approximately every 4 years to make the average length of the calendar year as nearly equal as possible to the tropical year
leap year
A leap year is a year which has 366 days. The extra day is the 29th February. There is a leap year every four years. a year, which happens every fourth year, when February has 29 days instead of 28 (Perhaps because a date in such a year "jumps" one day ahead of the day on which it would otherwise have fallen)
leap year
A year containing 366 days rather than 365 There are three factors used to determine leap years Leap Years occur every four years, unless the year is divisible by 100 An exception is made for centesimal years in which the year is divisible by 400 As a result, the Year 2000 is a leap year, since it is divisible by 400
leap year
A year of 366 days, whereas a common year has 365, so called because festivals after 29 February "leap" forward by one day when compared with a normal day The addition of leap years to the calendar allows the synchronisation of the calendar year with the natural year
leap year
– any year which includes Feb 29; is determined by three factors: leap years occur every four years, unless the year is evenly divisible by 100, UNLESS the year is evenly divisible by 400
leap year
Year 2000 is a leap year, and some computers or other equipments may not accurately recognize it as such A given year is a leap year when one of two rules apply: If the year is evenly divisible by 4, but is not evenly divisible by 100, it is a leap year Thus 1896 was a leap year, but 1900 was not Most people know this, and most computers and equipment handle this first rule correctly However, there is a second rule: If the year is evenly divisible by 400, it is a leap year Therefore, year 2000 is a leap year Some people - and computer programs or equipment - may not recognize this
leap year
A 13-month year, which includes the intercalary month Poseideon II, lasting either 383 or 384 days (see Year Length for an explanation)
leap year
in the Gregorian calendar: any year divisible by 4 except centenary years not divisible by 400
leap year
A year with 366 in it We have a leap year every 4 years
leap year
In the Gregorian calendar, a leap year is any year which number can be divided by 4 without a remainder, and years ending in hundrets are no leap years unless they are divisible by 400 But the Eastern Orthodox churches compute leap years within the Gregorian calendar by using another rule; and that, a leap year is any year which number can be divided by 4 without a remainder, and years ending in hundrets are leap years, if a remainder of 2 or 6 occurs when such a year is divided by 9
leap year
A year that has 366 days instead of the standard 365 The extra day occurs on February 29th A leap year occurs whenever the year is: Evenly divisible by 400 Or
leap year
A year that contains 366 days instead of the normal 365 Leap years are used to keep the Gregorian calendar in sync with the solar year
leap year
A calendar year containing 366 days According to the present Gregorian calendar, all years with the date-number divisible by 4 are leap years, except century years The latter are leap years when the date-number is divisible by 400
leap year
Bissextile; a year containing 366 days; every fourth year which leaps over a day more than a common year, giving to February twenty-nine days
leap-frog
game with includes jumping over the heads of other players
Great Leap Forward
An economic and social plan used from 1958 to 1961 which aimed to use China's vast population to rapidly transform China from a primarily agrarian economy by peasant farmers into a modern communist society through the agriculturalization and industrialization
leaper
Agent noun of leap; one who leaps
leaping
Present participle of leap
look before you leap
Don't jump into something too precipitously; be at least a bit foresightful or circumspect
one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind
Words spoken by Neil Armstrong when taking the first steps on the moon
one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind
(used imitatively) A cliché used to exaggerate an accomplishment or milestone
quantum leap
An abrupt change
quantum leap
The discontinuous change of the state of an electron in an atom or molecule from one energy level to another
Great Leap Forward
an attempt by the Chinese government, led by Mao Zedong, to achieve very rapid industrial development between 1958 and 1960. Failed industrialization campaign undertaken by the Chinese Communists between 1958 and early 1960. Mao Zedong hoped to develop labor-intensive methods of industrialization that would emphasize manpower rather than the gradual purchase of heavy machinery, thereby putting to use China's dense population and obviating the need to accumulate capital. Rather than large new factories, he proposed developing backyard steel furnaces in every village. Rural people were organized into communes where agricultural and political decisions emphasized ideological purity rather than expertise. The program was implemented so hastily and zealously that many errors occurred; these were exacerbated by a series of natural disasters and the withdrawal of Soviet technical personnel. China's agriculture was so disrupted that about 20 million people died of starvation from 1958 to 1962. By early 1960 the government began to repeal the Great Leap Forward; private plots were returned to peasants and expertise began to be emphasized again
Leaped
leep
Leaped
lep
leap year
{i} bissextile
leaper
A kind of hooked instrument for untwisting old cordage
leaper
{i} person or thing that leaps, jumper, hopper
leaper
One who leaps
leaper
One who, or that which, leaps
leaper
an athlete who bounds or leaps (as in basketball)
leaping
a light springing movement upwards or forwards
leaping
from Leap, to jump
leaps
Long-dated, exchange-traded options
leaps
abbreviation for long term equity anticipation securities (long term options)
leaps
Long-term Equity AnticiPation Securities are long-term stock or index options LEAPS, like all options, are available in two types, calls and puts, with expiration dates up to three years in the future
leaps
Stock options lasting up to three years that allow the customer to speculate about market conditions for the long term
leaps
Stock options with expiration dates that are up to three years in the future Since conventional puts and calls typically expire within months, LEAPS provide an opportunity for more long-term speculation about market trends
leaps
Long-term equity anticipation securities Long-term options
leaps
Options that won't expire for up to three years Acronym for long-term equity anticipation securities
leaps
A long-dated option that has an expiration date up to three years out
leaps
Plural of leap
leaps
(Long Term Equity Anticipation Security): A long-term exchange traded equity Option Usually more than one year
leaps
In English, this means calls and puts with an expiration as long as thirty-nine months Currently, equity LEAPS have two series at any time with a January expiration For example, in October 2000, LEAPS are available with expirations of January 2002 and January 2003
leaps
An acronym for Long-term Equity AnticiPation Securities LEAPS are put or call options with expiration dates set as far as two years into the future Like standard options, each LEAPS contract represents 100 shares of the underlying stock
leaps
Acronym for long-term equity anticipation securities , which are long-term listed options, with maturities that can be as long as two and a half years
leaps
Long-term Equity Anticipation Securities are long-term stock or index options LEAPS are available in two types, calls and puts They have expiration dates up to three years in the future
leaps
See: Long-Term Anticipation Securities
leapt
Leapt is a past tense and past participle of leap. A past tense and a past participle of leap. a past tense and past participle of leap
meteoric leap
sudden forward progress
one small step for man-one giant leap for mankind
words of the American astronaut Neil Armstrong who was the first man to walk on the moon
quantum leap
An abrupt change or step, especially in method, information, or knowledge: "War was going to take a quantum leap; it would never be the same" (Garry Wills). a very large and important development or improvement quantum leap in
quantum leap
a sudden large increase or advance; "this may not insure success but it will represent a quantum leap from last summer
quantum leap
huge leap, enormous jump
take a flying leap
go away, take a hike, get out of here
leap
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