august

listen to the pronunciation of august
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} Ağustos

O, bana ağustosta Paris'e gideceğini söyledi. - She told me that she would go to Paris in August.

Ağustos ayı sonlarında İtilâf Devletleri, Paris'i ele geçirdi. - In late August, the Allied forces captured Paris.

{s} yüce ve çok saygın
saygın
ulu

Sekiz Ağustosta Ulusa seslendi. - He spoke to the nation on August eighth.

heybetli
görkemli
yüce
soylu
Ağustos, yılın 8. ayı
Ağustos: Gregoryen Takvimi'ne göre yılın 8. ayı olup 31 gün çeker. Türkçe'de bu aya "Harman ayı", "Lobut ayı" da denir. Kimi yerlerde bu ay için "Temmuz" ayı gibi "Orak ayı" dendiği de olur
{s} muhterem
{s} saygıdeğer
{s} aziz

Aziz Augustine tarafından yazılan İtiraflar bize ortodokslukta biten entelektüel arayışın zamansız bir hikayesini anlatır. - Confessions by St. Augustine tells us the timeless story of an intellectual quest that ends in orthodoxy.

{s} muhteşem
yılın sekizinci ayı
august bank holiday
Ağustos banka tatil
august schleicher
Ağustos Schleicher
augustness
soyluluk
mid august
ağustos'un ortası
augustly
saygı göstererek
augustness
yücelik
augustness
ululuk
İngilizce - İngilizce
A male given name, variant of Augustus borrowed from continental Europe
The eighth month of the Gregorian calendar, following July and preceding September. Abbreviation: Aug or Aug
A female given name derived from the month (rare modern usage)
Noble, venerable, majestic, awe-inspiring, often of the highest social class (sometimes used ironically)

an august patron of the arts.

Of noble birth

august lineage.

{n} a month, the 8th month of the year
{a} grand, magnificent, impressing veneration
derived from the Roman name
{i} eighth month of the Gregorian calendar; male first name; family name; town in California (USA)
of modern usage, derived from the month
August is the eighth month of the year in the Western calendar. The world premiere took place in August 1956 The trial will resume on August the twenty-second This August has been the wettest for four years. Someone or something that is august is dignified and impressive. the august surroundings of the Liberal Club. = imposing. the eighth month of the year, between July and September next/last August (Augustus, from Augustus Caesar (63BC - AD14), Roman emperor). impressive and respected (augustus). adj. Arrhenius Svante August August Fryderyk Bebel August Bournonville August Bruch Max Karl August Bürger Gottfried August Froebel Friedrich Wilhelm August Georg August Gneisenau August Wilhelm Anton Count Neidhardt von Haeckel Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Hardenberg Karl August prince von Hayek Friedrich August von Herbert Victor August Holstein Friedrich August von Kotzebue August Friedrich Ferdinand von Löffler Friedrich August Johannes Möbius August Ferdinand Nielsen Carl August Otto Nikolaus August Riis Jacob August Schlegel August Wilhelm von Schleicher August Zygmunt August Stanislaw II August Poniatowski Karl August Rudolf Steinmetz Strindberg Johan August Johann August Suter Wassermann August von Wilson August Franz Albrecht August Karl Emanuel prince von Sachsen Coburg Gotha Georg August Universität zu Göttingen Kekule von Stradonitz Friedrich August Friedrich August Kekule
of or befitting a lord; "heir to a lordly fortune"; "of august lineage
profoundly honored; "revered holy men"
The eighth month of the year, containing thirty-one days
the month following July and preceding September
the month following July and preceding September profoundly honored; "revered holy men"
Presentation Folders
the month following July and preceding September profoundly honored; "revered holy men" of or befitting a lord; "heir to a lordly fortune"; "of august lineage
of or befitting a lord; "heir to a lordly fortune"; "of august lineage"
{s} dignified, grand; venerable
Of a quality inspiring mingled admiration and reverence; having an aspect of solemn dignity or grandeur; sublime; majestic; having exalted birth, character, state, or authority
aug
August Count Neidhardt von Gneisenau
born Oct. 27, 1760, Schildau, near Torgau, Saxony died Aug. 23, 1831, Posen, Prussia Prussian field marshal and military reformer. Along with Gerhard J.D. von Scharnhorst, he remolded the Prussian army shattered by Napoleon (1806) from a mercenary force into an instrument of modern warfare, introducing universal military service. In 1811-12 he traveled on secret missions to negotiate a new war against Napoleon, which was renewed in 1813. As chief of staff to Gebhard von Blücher, he planned Prussian, and sometimes Russian, strategy. Gneisenau's insistence on the decisive battle and relentless pursuit proved successful at the Battle of Waterloo
August Bank Holiday
Late Summer Holiday an official public holiday in Britain on the last Monday in August
August Bebel
born Feb. 22, 1840, Deutz, near Cologne, Ger. died Aug. 13, 1913, Passugg, Switz. German socialist and writer. A turner by trade, Bebel joined the Leipzig Workers' Educational Association (1861) and became its chairman (1865). Influenced by the ideas of Wilhelm Liebknecht, in 1869 he helped found the Social Democratic Labour Party (later the Social Democratic Party) and became its most influential and popular leader for more than 40 years. He served in the Reichstag in 1867, 1871-81, and 1883-1913. He spent a total of nearly five years in prison on such charges as "libel of Bismarck." He wrote a number of works, including Woman and Socialism (1883), a powerful piece of Social Democratic propaganda
August Bournonville
born Aug. 21, 1805, Copenhagen, Den. died Nov. 30, 1879, Copenhagen Danish dancer, choreographer, and director of the Royal Danish Ballet for almost 50 years. After studying and performing in Paris and Copenhagen, in 1830 he became director and choreographer of the Royal Danish Ballet, where he continued to dance until 1848. He established the Danish style, characterized by bravura dancing and expressive mime. Many of his ballets were based on observations he made while on tour; Napoli (1842), for example, was inspired by a trip to Italy
August Ferdinand Möbius
born Nov. 17, 1790, Schulpforta, Saxony died Sept. 26, 1868, Leipzig German mathematician and theoretical astronomer. He began teaching at the University of Leipzig in 1815, and established his reputation with many publications. His mathematical papers are chiefly concerned with geometry. He introduced homogeneous coordinates into analytic geometry and dealt with geometric transformations, in particular projective transformations. He was a pioneer in topology; in a memoir discovered after his death he discussed the properties of one-sided surfaces, including the famous Möbius strip
August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue
born May 3, 1761, Weimar, Saxony died March 23, 1819, Mannheim, Baden German playwright. He helped popularize poetic drama, which he infused with melodramatic sensationalism and sentimental philosophizing. Prolific (he wrote more than 200 plays) and facile, he is known for works such as the dramas The Stranger (1789) and The Indian Exiles (1790) and the comedies Der Wildfang (1798; "The Trapping of Game") and Die deutschen Kleinstädter (1803; "Small-Town Germans"). He was denounced by political radicals as a spy and stabbed to death
August Kekule
orig. (Friedrich) August Kekule born Sept. 7, 1829, Darmstadt, Hesse died July 13, 1896, Bonn German chemist who laid the groundwork for modern structural theory in organic chemistry. His early training in architecture may have helped him conceive his theories. In 1858 he showed that carbon has a valence of four and that its atoms can link together to form long chains. He is said to have dreamed in 1865 of a benzene molecule as a snake biting its own tail and thus conceptualized the six-carbon benzene ring; the facts of organic chemistry known up to that time then fell into place. He also did valuable work on mercury compounds, unsaturated acids, and thio acids and wrote a four-volume textbook
August Kekule von Stradonitz
orig. (Friedrich) August Kekule born Sept. 7, 1829, Darmstadt, Hesse died July 13, 1896, Bonn German chemist who laid the groundwork for modern structural theory in organic chemistry. His early training in architecture may have helped him conceive his theories. In 1858 he showed that carbon has a valence of four and that its atoms can link together to form long chains. He is said to have dreamed in 1865 of a benzene molecule as a snake biting its own tail and thus conceptualized the six-carbon benzene ring; the facts of organic chemistry known up to that time then fell into place. He also did valuable work on mercury compounds, unsaturated acids, and thio acids and wrote a four-volume textbook
August Macke
(1887-1914) German expressionist painter and member of the Blaue Reiter group
August Schleicher
born Feb. 19, 1821, Meiningen, Saxe-Meiningen died Dec. 6, 1868, Jena, Prussia German linguist. He began his career studying classical and Slavic languages. Influenced by G.W.F. Hegel and Charles Darwin, he formed the theory that a language is an organism, with periods of development, maturity, and decline. He invented a system of language classification that resembled a botanical taxonomy, tracing groups of related languages and arranging them in a genealogical tree. His model, the Stammbaumtheorie ("family-tree theory"), was a major development in the study of Indo-European languages. His great work was A Compendium of the Comparative Grammar of the Indo-European, Sanskrit, Greek and Latin Languages (1874-77), in which he attempted to reconstruct Proto-Indo-European
August Strindberg
born Jan. 22, 1849, Stockholm, Swed. died May 14, 1912, Stockholm Swedish playwright and novelist. While working as a journalist, he wrote the historical drama Mäster Olof (1872); though rejected by the national theatre and not produced until 1890, it is now considered the first modern Swedish drama. He won fame with his novel The Red Room (1879), which satirized the Stockholm art world. His unhappy life included three marriages and episodes of mental instability. In his most creative period he moved restlessly around Europe for six years, writing his three major plays: The Father (1887), Miss Julie (1888), and The Creditors (1890). These iconoclastic works portrayed the battle of the sexes using a combination of dramatic naturalism and psychology. During this period he also wrote three novels. After a mental breakdown he experienced a religious conversion that inspired symbolic dramas such as The Dance of Death (1901), A Dream Play (1902), and five "chamber plays," including The Ghost Sonata (1907)
August Wilhelm Anton Count Neidhardt von Gneisenau
born Oct. 27, 1760, Schildau, near Torgau, Saxony died Aug. 23, 1831, Posen, Prussia Prussian field marshal and military reformer. Along with Gerhard J.D. von Scharnhorst, he remolded the Prussian army shattered by Napoleon (1806) from a mercenary force into an instrument of modern warfare, introducing universal military service. In 1811-12 he traveled on secret missions to negotiate a new war against Napoleon, which was renewed in 1813. As chief of staff to Gebhard von Blücher, he planned Prussian, and sometimes Russian, strategy. Gneisenau's insistence on the decisive battle and relentless pursuit proved successful at the Battle of Waterloo
August Wilhelm von Schlegel
born Sept. 8, 1767, Hannover, Hanover died May 12, 1845, Bonn German scholar and critic. He worked as a tutor and wrote for Friedrich Schiller's short-lived periodical Die Horen before cofounding with his brother Friedrich von Schlegel the periodical Athenäum (1798-1800), which became the organ of German Romanticism. While a professor at the University of Jena, he undertook translations of the works of William Shakespeare (1797-1810) that became standard editions and are among the finest of all German literary translations. His Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature (1809-11) was widely translated and helped spread fundamental Romantic ideas throughout Europe. From 1818 until his death he taught at the University of Bonn
August Wilson
born April 27, 1945, Pittsburgh, Pa., U.S. U.S. playwright. He was largely self-educated. A participant in the black aesthetic movement, he cofounded and directed Pittsburgh's Black Horizons Theatre (1968), published poetry in African American journals, and produced several plays, including Jitney (1982), before his Ma Rainey's Black Bottom opened on Broadway in 1984. Inspired by the colloquial language, music, folklore, and storytelling tradition of African Americans, he continued his cycle of plays, each set in a different decade of the 20th century, with Fences (1986, Pulitzer Prize), Joe Turner's Come and Gone (1988), The Piano Lesson (1990, Pulitzer Prize), Two Trains Running (1992), and Seven Guitars (1996)
August von Kotzebue
born May 3, 1761, Weimar, Saxony died March 23, 1819, Mannheim, Baden German playwright. He helped popularize poetic drama, which he infused with melodramatic sensationalism and sentimental philosophizing. Prolific (he wrote more than 200 plays) and facile, he is known for works such as the dramas The Stranger (1789) and The Indian Exiles (1790) and the comedies Der Wildfang (1798; "The Trapping of Game") and Die deutschen Kleinstädter (1803; "Small-Town Germans"). He was denounced by political radicals as a spy and stabbed to death
August von Wassermann
born Feb. 21, 1866, Bamberg, Bavaria died March 16, 1925, Berlin, Ger. German bacteriologist. With Albert Neisser (1855-1916) he developed a test for the antibody to the spirochete that causes syphilis in 1906. That test, along with other procedures, is still used to diagnose syphilis. He is also noted for developing tests for tuberculosis. With Wilhelm Kolle he wrote Handbook of Pathogenic Microorganisms (6 vol., 1903-09)
august elder
respected senior, venerable elder
August.
Ag
augustly
In an august or awe inspiring manner
mid-August
In the middle of August
mid-August
Any time in the middle of August
mid-August
Happening in the middle of August
augustness
{n} dignity, majesty, grandeur
Auguste
Atget Jean Eugène Auguste Barrès Auguste Maurice Bartholdi Frédéric Auguste Blanqui Louis- Auguste Bourgeois Léon Victor Auguste Caillaux Joseph Marie Auguste Chateaubriand François Auguste René viscount of Chouteau René Auguste Comte Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Escoffier Georges Auguste Franck César Auguste Hanotaux Albert Auguste Gabriel Ingres Jean Auguste Dominique Jaurès Auguste Marie Joseph Jean Lartigue Jacques Henri Charles Auguste Ledru Rollin Alexandre Auguste Lumière Auguste and Louis Morny Charles Auguste Louis Joseph duke de Piccard Auguste Renoir Pierre Auguste Rodin François Auguste René Vestris Marie Jean Auguste Sophie Friederike Auguste princess von Anhalt Zerbst Marie René Auguste Aléxis Saint Léger Léger
Auguste
{i} male first name (French)
Carl August Nielsen
born June 9, 1865, Sortelung, near Norre Lyndelse, Den. died Oct. 3, 1931, Copenhagen Danish composer. He studied violin and trumpet as a child and began composing by imitating classical models. In 1890 he went to Germany to learn of newer developments and met Johannes Brahms, whose music came to influence his own. His individual style still following classical forms but using intense chromaticism combined with a lyric, melodic strain emerged after 1900. The last five of his six symphonies (1902-25) are the core of his work, but he also composed many short orchestra pieces, piano and chamber music, concertos for violin, flute, and clarinet, and a wind quintet
Carl August Peter Cornelius
{i} Peter Cornelius (1824-1874), German composer and poet
Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel
born Feb. 16, 1834, Potsdam, Prussia died Aug. 9, 1919, Jena, Ger. German zoologist and evolutionist. After receiving a degree in medicine in 1857, he obtained a doctorate in zoology from the University of Jena, and from 1862 to 1909 he taught zoology at Jena. His work concentrated on diverse marine invertebrates. Influenced by Charles Darwin, Haeckel saw evolution as the basis for an explanation of all nature and the rationale of a philosophical approach. He attempted to create the first genealogical tree of the entire animal kingdom. He proposed that each species illustrates its evolutionary history in its embryological development ("Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny"). Through his theories of the evolution of humans, he brought attention to important biological questions. Through his numerous books, he was an influential popularizer of evolutionary theory
Friedrich August Johannes Loffler
{i} (1852-1915) German bacteriologist
Friedrich August Johannes Löffler
born June 24, 1852, Frankfurt an der Oder, Prussia died April 9, 1915, Berlin, Ger. German bacteriologist. In 1884, with Edwin Klebs (1834-1913), he discovered the organism that causes diphtheria. Simultaneously with Émile Roux (1853-1933) and Alexandre Yersin (1863-1943), he indicated the existence of a diphtheria toxin. His demonstration that some animals are immune to diphtheria was basic to Emil von Behring's work in developing antitoxins. Löffler also discovered the cause of some swine diseases and identified, with Wilhelm Schütz, the organism that causes the horse disease glanders. With Paul Frosch he found that foot-and-mouth disease is caused by a virus (the first time a virus was found to be the agent of an animal disease) and developed a serum against it
Friedrich August Kekule
orig. (Friedrich) August Kekule born Sept. 7, 1829, Darmstadt, Hesse died July 13, 1896, Bonn German chemist who laid the groundwork for modern structural theory in organic chemistry. His early training in architecture may have helped him conceive his theories. In 1858 he showed that carbon has a valence of four and that its atoms can link together to form long chains. He is said to have dreamed in 1865 of a benzene molecule as a snake biting its own tail and thus conceptualized the six-carbon benzene ring; the facts of organic chemistry known up to that time then fell into place. He also did valuable work on mercury compounds, unsaturated acids, and thio acids and wrote a four-volume textbook
Friedrich August Kekule von Stradonitz
orig. (Friedrich) August Kekule born Sept. 7, 1829, Darmstadt, Hesse died July 13, 1896, Bonn German chemist who laid the groundwork for modern structural theory in organic chemistry. His early training in architecture may have helped him conceive his theories. In 1858 he showed that carbon has a valence of four and that its atoms can link together to form long chains. He is said to have dreamed in 1865 of a benzene molecule as a snake biting its own tail and thus conceptualized the six-carbon benzene ring; the facts of organic chemistry known up to that time then fell into place. He also did valuable work on mercury compounds, unsaturated acids, and thio acids and wrote a four-volume textbook
Friedrich August von Hayek
born May 8, 1899, Vienna, Austria died March 23, 1992, Freiburg, Ger. Austrian-born British economist. He moved to London in 1931 and held positions at the University of London and the London School of Economics, becoming a British citizen in 1938. Later posts included a professorship at the University of Chicago (1950-62). Throughout his life Hayek criticized socialism, often contrasting it with a system of free markets. In his works he opposed the theories of John Maynard Keynes and argued that government intervention in the free market is destructive of individual values and could not prevent such economic ailments as inflation, unemployment, and recession. His books include The Road to Serfdom (1944), The Constitution of Liberty (1960), and The Political Order of a Free People (1979). His views have been highly influential among conservatives, including Margaret Thatcher. In 1974 he shared the Nobel Prize with Gunnar Myrdal
Friedrich August von Holstein
born April 24, 1837, Schwedt an der Oder, Pomerania died May 8, 1909, Berlin, Ger. German diplomat. A member of the German foreign office from 1876, he never became foreign minister but exercised power behind the scenes, earning the nickname "the Gray Eminence." He broke with Otto von Bismarck over his alignment with Russia, as Holstein advocated a firm alliance with Austria and Britain. After Bismarck's dismissal in 1890, Holstein advised against the renewal of the Reinsurance Treaty. He held important posts under Chancellors Leo, count von Caprivi, Chlodwig, prince zu Hohenlohe-Schillingfürst, and Bernhard, prince von Bülow, but he proved powerless to oppose the policies of Emperor William II and was dismissed in 1906
Friedrich Wilhelm August Froebel
or Friedrich Wilhelm Fröbel born April 21, 1782, Oberweissbach, Thuringia, Ernestine Saxony died June 21, 1852, Marienthal, near Bad Liebenstein, Thuringia German educator and founder of the kindergarten. Influenced by the theories of Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, he founded an infant school in 1837 that he later called the Kindergarten, or "garden of children." He believed in "self-activity" and play as essential factors in child education, the teacher's role being not to drill or indoctrinate but rather to encourage self-expression through play. He greatly influenced modern techniques in preschool education, including the ideas of John Dewey
Gottfried August Bürger
born Dec. 31, 1747, Molmerswende bei Halberstadt, Brandenburg died June 8, 1794, Göttingen, Hanover German poet. He was associated with the Göttinger Hain, a circle of Sturm und Drang poets who reawakened interest in folk and nature themes. His bizarre ballad "Lenore" (1773) had a profound effect on the subsequent development of literary Romanticism throughout Europe, and he is remembered as a founder of German Romantic ballad literature. He is also noted for his Petrarchan sonnets and translations from English, especially Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry
Jacob August Riis
born May 3, 1849, Ribe, Den. died May 26, 1914, Barre, Mass., U.S. U.S. journalist and social reformer. He immigrated to the U.S. at 21 and became a police reporter for the New York Tribune (1877-88) and the New York Evening Sun (1888-99). He publicized the deplorable living conditions in the slums of New York's Lower East Side, photographing the rooms and hallways of tenements. He compiled his findings in How the Other Half Lives (1890), a book that stirred the nation's conscience and spurred the state's first significant legislation to improve tenements
Johan August Strindberg
born Jan. 22, 1849, Stockholm, Swed. died May 14, 1912, Stockholm Swedish playwright and novelist. While working as a journalist, he wrote the historical drama Mäster Olof (1872); though rejected by the national theatre and not produced until 1890, it is now considered the first modern Swedish drama. He won fame with his novel The Red Room (1879), which satirized the Stockholm art world. His unhappy life included three marriages and episodes of mental instability. In his most creative period he moved restlessly around Europe for six years, writing his three major plays: The Father (1887), Miss Julie (1888), and The Creditors (1890). These iconoclastic works portrayed the battle of the sexes using a combination of dramatic naturalism and psychology. During this period he also wrote three novels. After a mental breakdown he experienced a religious conversion that inspired symbolic dramas such as The Dance of Death (1901), A Dream Play (1902), and five "chamber plays," including The Ghost Sonata (1907)
Karl August prince von Hardenberg
born May 31, 1750, Essenrode, near Gifhorn, Brunswick died Nov. 26, 1822, Genoa, Italy Prussian statesman who preserved the integrity of the Prussian state during the Napoleonic Wars. He won the abiding trust of Frederick William III in 1798 and served as foreign minister (1804-06). He was forced to withdraw from political life, at Napoleon's behest, after Prussia's collapse in the war of 1806-07 against France. When Prussia was faced with insolvency and could not pay war indemnities in 1810, Napoleon agreed to Hardenberg's reinstatement, and he became prime minister with full powers. He continued the domestic reforms introduced by Karl, imperial baron vom und zum Stein, and liberalized financial, economic, and agricultural policies. In foreign affairs he exchanged Prussia's alliance with France for an alliance with Russia in 1813, and in 1814-15 he represented Prussia at the peace negotiations in Paris and Vienna
Max Karl August Bruch
born Jan. 6, 1838, Cologne, Prussia died Oct. 2, 1920, Friedensau, near Berlin, Ger. German composer. Bruch held many conducting positions and taught for 20 years at the Berlin Academy. He was known in his lifetime principally for his many sacred and secular choral pieces, including Odysseus (1872) and Das Lied von der Glocke (1879). Today he is remembered especially for his first violin concerto (1868); he also wrote two further violin concertos, the cello variations Kol Nidrei (1881), and operas and symphonies
Nikolaus August Otto
born June 10, 1832, Holzhausen, Nassau died Jan. 26, 1891, Cologne, Ger. German engineer who developed the four-stroke internal-combustion engine. He built his first gasoline-powered engine in 1861, and in 1876 he built an internal-combustion engine using the four-stroke cycle (four strokes of the piston for each explosion), which offered the first practical alternative to the steam engine as a power source. Though the four-stroke cycle was patented in 1862 by Alphonse Beau de Rochas (1815-93), it is commonly known as the Otto cycle since Otto was the first to build such an engine
Stanislaw II August Poniatowski
orig. Stanisaw Poniatowski born Jan. 17, 1732, Woczyn, Pol. died Feb. 12, 1798, St. Petersburg, Russia King of Poland (1764-95). Son of a Polish noble, he was sent in 1757 to Russia to win support for Polish interests and became the lover of the future Empress Catherine II. In 1764 Catherine used Russian troops and influence to ensure Stanisaw's election as king. He tried to introduce administrative reforms, but opposition from Polish nobles and from Catherine forced him to continue his rule as a pawn of Russia. He attempted to pass a new constitution but could not stop the partitions of Poland (1772, 1793, 1795), after which he abdicated
Svante August Arrhenius
born Feb. 19, 1859, Vik, Swed. died Oct. 2, 1927, Stockholm Swedish physical chemist. His theories on dissociation of substances in solution into electrolytes or ions, first published in 1884 as his Ph.D. thesis, were initially met with skepticism, but increasing recognition abroad gradually won over the opposition in Sweden. He also did important work on reaction rates; the equation describing the dependence of reaction rates on temperature is often called the Arrhenius law, and he was the first to recognize the greenhouse effect. After receiving the Royal Society of London's Davy Medal (1902), he became in 1903 the third recipient of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry. He is regarded as one of the founders of the field of physical chemistry
Victor August Herbert
born Feb. 1, 1859, Dublin, Ire. died May 26, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. Irish-born U.S. composer. After his widowed mother married a German doctor, he was raised in Stuttgart, and he studied at its conservatory. He married the soprano Therese Forrester in 1886, and they moved to the U.S., she to sing and he to play in the orchestra at the new Metropolitan Opera. He was soon active as a conductor, cellist, composer, and teacher. His solid training, orchestrating skill, and melodic gift found natural expression in more than 40 operettas, including Babes in Toyland (1903), Mlle Modiste (1905), The Red Mill (1906), and Naughty Marietta (1910)
auguste
A kind of circus clown
auguster
comparative of august
augustest
superlative of august
augustly
In a royal or regal manner
augustly
sublimely, majestically
augustly
In an august manner
augustness
{i} nobility; magnificence
augustness
The state or quality of being august or noble
augustness
The quality of being august; dignity of mien; grandeur; magnificence
mid-august
the middle part of August
prince von Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha Franz Albrecht August Karl Emanuel
orig. Franz Albrecht August Karl Emanuel, prince von Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha born Aug. 26, 1819, Schloss Rosenau, near Coburg, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha died Dec. 14, 1861, Windsor Castle, Berkshire, Eng. Prince consort of Queen Victoria of Britain and father of Edward VII. Albert married Victoria, his first cousin, in 1840 and became in effect her private secretary and chief confidential adviser. Their domestic happiness helped assure the continuation of the monarchy, which had been somewhat uncertain. Though the German-born Albert was undeservedly unpopular, the British public belatedly recognized his worth after his death at age 42 from typhoid fever. In the ensuing years the grief-stricken queen made policy decisions based on what she thought Albert would have done
Türkçe - İngilizce
{k} Aug
august

    Heceleme

    au·gust

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    ôgıst

    Zıt anlamlılar

    undignified

    Telaffuz

    /ˈôgəst/ /ˈɔːɡəst/

    Etimoloji

    [ o-'g&st, 'o-(")g&st ] (adjective.) 1664. Early Middle English August(us), re-Latinized from Old English Agustus, from Late Latin Agustus, from Latin augustus (“month of August”), from the agnomen Augustus (“venerable”) of Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus, possibly from either Old Latin *augos, increase, from Proto-Indo-European base *aug-, to increase; or Latin avis (“bird”), referring to divination by observing bird flights, singing, feeding or entrails, from Proto-Indo-European *awi-, bird; + Latin garrire, to chatter, from Proto-Indo-European base *gar-/*ger-, to cry, of imitative origin

    Videolar

    ... I'm waiting until August 24. ...
    ... By August, that number had doubled to 200,000. Then 300,000 in December. And today, we are ...

    Günün kelimesi

    iatrogenic