magnitude

listen to the pronunciation of magnitude
Englisch - Türkisch
{i} büyüklük
(Astronomi) magnitüt
magnitüd
(Çevre) manyetüd
cesamet
(Astronomi) gökcisimlerinin parlaklığı
önem
star of the first magnitude birinci kadirden olan yıldız
ehemmiyet
{i} kadir [(Astronomi) ]
{i} (Gökbilim) kadir
kadir
{i} büyüklük, boy
genlik
boyut
kadirî
importance
önem

Meselenin önemini ona iyice anlatmalısın. - You must bring home to him the importance of the matter.

Bu problem sadece ikincil derecede önemli. - This problem is only of secondary importance.

magnitude difference
parlaklık farkı
magnitude relation
büyüklük ilişkisi
magnitude method
(Askeri) MESAFE ATIŞ TANZİMİ: Topçu atışının mesafece tanzimi usulü. Bu usulde, atım hedefe düşmeyince, düştüğü yerden hedefe kadar olan yan ve mesafe ölçülerek ve bu miktarlar hedef şebekesine geçilerek atımın geri noktalanır. Bu usul; yan ve mesafe tespit edildiği zaman kullanılır. Bunu, çatal usulü demek olan (bracketing method) ile karıştırılmamalıdır
magnitude of the operation
(Askeri) Harekatın büyüklüğü
magnitude of the pressure
basıncın genliği
magnitude of the settlement
oturma miktarı
magnitude scaling
büyüklük ölçeklemesi
absolute magnitude
mutlak büyüklük
apparent magnitude
(Aydınlatma) görünür büyüklük
earthquake magnitude
(Çevre) depremin büyüklüğü
response magnitude
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) tepki büyüklüğü
apparent magnitude
görünürdeki parlaklık
bolometric magnitude
bolometrik parlaklık
change magnitude
büyüklüğünü değiştir
change of magnitude
büyüklüğün değişmesi
colour magnitude diagram
renk parlaklık diyagramı
order at magnitude
büyüklük kertesi
relative magnitude
izafi büyüklük
district magnitude
mahalli büyüklük
having a size or magnitude of one
bir boyutu veya büyüklüğü biri olan
integrated magnitude
toplam kadir
visual magnitude
görsel parlaklık
angular magnitude
açısal büyüklük
earthquake magnitude
(Nükleer Bilimler) deprem genliği,depremin büyüklüğü
importance
{i} kibir
importance
{i} itibar
importance
{i} saygınlık
importance
{i} etki, nüfuz, itibar
importance
{i} ehemmiyet
intermediate magnitude
orta büyüklük
moment magnitude
(Çevre) moment manyetüd
rank of tsunami magnitude
(Askeri) tsunami büyüklük derecesi
sign magnitude arithmetic
isaret-genlik aritmeti¤i
two station magnitude spotting
(Askeri) İKİ NOKTADAN KESTİRME: Bir merminin, hedefe nazaran vuruş noktasının gözetlenmesine ve kestirilmesine mahsus bir sistem. Bu sistemde, yatay bir baz hattının iki ucunda birer gözetleme noktası kullanılır
Englisch - Englisch
The absolute or relative size, extent or importance of something
A measure of the energy released by an earthquake (e.g. on the Richter scale)
Of a vector, the norm, most commonly, the two-norm
A number, assigned to something, such that it may be compared to others numerically
The apparent brightness of a star (on a negative, logarithmic scale); apparent magnitude
importance
{n} greatness, size, comparative bulk
A number, measured on a logarithmic scale, used to indicate the brightness of an object Two stars differing by 5 magnitudes differ in brightness by a factor of 100 The brighter the star, the lower the numerical value of the magnitude; very bright objects have negative magnitudes The star Vega (alpha Lyrae) is defined to be magnitude zero
A measure of the amount of light received from a celestial object Based on ancient Greek classifications, objects with smaller magnitudes are brighter ("those objects of the first magnitude" referred to the brightest objects) Since it originated in the appearance of objects perceived by the human eye, it is a scale of ratios rather than a linear scale: an object one magnitude brighter than another is about 2 512 times brighter The basis is a difference of five magnitudes is a difference in brightness of 100; thus, a difference of one magnitude is the fifth root of 100 The difference in magnitudes between two stars of brightnesses l1 and l2 is
That which has one or more of the three dimensions, length, breadth, and thickness
relative importance; "a problem of the first magnitude
The length of a magnetization vector In NMR, the square root of the sum of the squares of the Mx and My components, i e the magnitude of the transverse magnetization [Chapter 2]
Greatness; grandeur
brightness scale; the smaller the magnitude number, the brighter the object so that the Sun (magnitude -26) is much brighter than Uranus (magnitude +6)
If you talk about the magnitude of something, you are talking about its great size, scale, or importance. An operation of this magnitude is going to be difficult
A general term for a measure of the strength or energy of an earthquake as determined from seismographic information
The degree of brightness of a celestial body designated on a numerical scale, on which the brightest star has magnitude -1 4 and the faintest visible star has magnitude 6, with the scale rule such that a decrease of one unit represents an increase in apparent brightness by a factor of 2 512; also called apparent magnitude
A measure of the faintness of a star Magnitude 6 0 is the faintest we can ordinarily see, and the average of the twenty brightest stars defines magnitude 1 0 Each magnitude step is a factor of 2 5 in brightness
Apparent magnitude is an object's brightness as seen from Earth (e.g., -26.7 for the Sun, about -11 for the Moon). Absolute magnitude is an object's brightness as it would be seen at a distance of 10 parsecs (32.6 light-years; e.g., 4.8 for the Sun). See also albedo; photometry
A measure of the strength of an earthquake or strain energy released by it, as determined by seismographic observations The local body- and surface-wave magnitudes will have approximately the same numerical value
A number that characterizes the relative size of an earthquake Magnitude is based on measurement of the maximum motion recorded by a seismograph Several scales have been defined, but the most commonly used are (1) local magnitude (ML), commonly referred to as "Richter magnitude," (2) surface-wave magnitude (Ms), (3) body-wave magnitude (Mb), and (4) moment magnitude (Mw) Scales 1-3 have limited range and applicability and do not satisfactorily measure the size of the largest earthquakes The moment magnitude (Mw) scale, based on the concept of seismic moment, is uniformly applicable to all sizes of earthquakes but is more difficult to compute than the other types All magnitude scales should yield approximately the same value for any given earthquake
Measure of the brightness of a star The lower the number, the easier it is to see 7th magnitude it the dimmest object visible to the human eye Most CCD Cameras can pick up light at the 20th magnitude
used to quantify brightness Based on the ancient system of Hipparchus but refined and quantified for measurements today such that a ratio of 100 in brightness corresponds to a magnitude difference of 5 Fainter objects have larger, positive magnitudes (closer to positive infinity), while brighter objects have lower magnitudes (closer to negative infinity)
Magnitude - A numerical value for the brightness of a celestial object The brighter an object is in the sky, the smaller its magnitude The dimmer an object is in the sky, the larger its magnitude (Table reads from dimmest to brightest)
relative importance; "a problem of the first magnitude"
The degree of brightness of a star or other object in the sky according to a scale on which the brightest star has a magnitude -1 4 and the faintest visible star has magnitude 6 Sometimes referred to as apparent magnitude In this scale, each number is 2 5 times the brightness of the previous number Thus a star with a magnitude of 1 is 100 times brighter than on with a visual magnitude of 6
Magnitude is a measure of the size of an earthquake or strain energy released by it, as determined by seismographic observations More->
Scale used to measure the Brightness of a object The scale is logarithmical based This means that a magnitude difference of 5 means that the one object is 100 time brighter (or more luminous) than the other Objects with a smaller magnitude are brighter The Sun has a magnitude of about -26, the full moon -12, the faintest objects you can see naked eye are typically magnitude +5, and telescopes can now detect down to about mag +29/30 There are several of magnitude: Apparent, Absolute and Bolometric Apparent - The magnitude of an object as view from the earth Absolute - The magnitude of the object if it were to be viewed from 10 parsecs away Bolometric - The magnitude of the object if all its luminosity at all wavelengths were taken into account (ie Radio -> X-rays/Gamma radiation) N
The brightness of a star or planet, expressed on a scale in which lower numbers mean greater brightness Apparent magnitude indicates the brightness of objects as we see them from Earth, regardless of their distance Absolute magnitude is defined magnitude a star would have if viewed from a standard distance of 10 parsecs (1 Parsec is 3 26 light years See below) Each step in magnitude equals a difference of 2 5 times in brightness: the brightes stars in the sky are apparent magnitude 1; the dimmest, 6 The magnitudes of extremely bright objects are expressed in negative numbers e g the apparent magnitude of the Sun is around -26
an arbitrary number, measured on a logarithmic scale, used to indicate the brightness of an object The brighter the star, the lower the numerical value of the magnitude and very bright objects have negative magnitudes
A measure of the energy released by an earthquake Measured using the Richter scale based on the amplitude of the seismic wave recorded by seismographs
Measurement of brightness The lower the magnitude value of an object, the brighter that object is Any given value is about 2 5 times dimmer than that value minus one, so mag 1 is 2 5 times brighter than mag 2, mag 2 is 2 5 times brighter than mag 3, and so on Magnitude can be negative, and often is with bright objects such as the Sun, the Moon and the occasional satellite With the occasional exception, most stars are 1st magnitude or fainter
The degree of brightness of a celestial body designated on a numerical scale, on which the brightest star has magnitude -1 4 and the faintest star visible to the unaided eye, has magnitude 6 A decrease of one unit represents an increase in apparent brightness by a factor of 2 512 Apparent magnitude of a star is the brightness as we see it from Earth, whilst absolute magnitude is a measure of its intrinsic luminosity Lower numbers represent brighter objects
A way of expressing the brightness of astronomical objects inherited from the Greeks In the magnitude system, a lower number indicates a brighter object (for example, a 1st magnitude star is brighter than a 3rd magnitude star) Each step in magnitude corresponds to a brightnesss difference of a factor of about 2 5 Stars of the 6th magnitude are the faintest the unaided human eye can see
A numerical expression of the amount of energy released by an earthquake, determined by measuring earthquake waves on standardized recording instruments (seismographs ) The number scale for magnitudes is logarithmic rather than arithmetic; therefore, deflections on a seismograph for a magnitude 5 earthquake, for example, are 10 times greater than those for a magnitude 4 earthquake, 100 times greater than for a magnitude 3 earthquake, and so on
Extent of dimensions; size; applied to things that have length, breadth, and thickness
the property of relative size or extent; "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion"
the property of relative size or extent; "they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion" relative importance; "a problem of the first magnitude
The size (of the earthquake), a measure of how large the shake was This is measured on a scale known as the Richter Scale
A measure of the strength of an earthquake or strain energy released by it, as determined by seismographic observations This is a logarithmic value originally defined by Charles Richter (1935) An increase of one unit of magnitude (for example, from 4 6 to 5 6) represents a 10-fold increase in wave amplitude on a seismogram or approximately a 30-fold increase in the energy released In other words, a magnitude 6 7 earthquake releases over 900 times (30 times 30) the energy of a 4 7 earthquake - or it takes about 900 magnitude 4 7 earthquakes to equal the energy released in a single 6 7 earthquake! There is no beginning nor end to this scale However, rock mechanics seems to preclude earthquakes smaller than about -1 or larger than about 9 5 A magnitude -1 0 event release about 900 times less energy than a magnitude 1 0 quake Except in special circumstances, earthquakes below magnitude 2 5 are not generally felt by humans
Greatness, in reference to influence or effect; importance; as, an affair of magnitude
You can use order of magnitude when you are giving an approximate idea of the amount or importance of something. America and Russia do not face a problem of the same order of magnitude as Japan. = scale. In astronomy, the measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial body. The brighter the object, the lower the number assigned as a magnitude. In ancient times six magnitude classes were used, the first containing the brightest stars (see Hipparchus). In the present system a difference of one magnitude is defined as a ratio of brightness of 2.512 times. Thus, a difference of five magnitudes corresponds to a brightness ratio of 100 to
The scale on which the brightness of a star is measured The brightest stars are first magnitude stars The faintest stars we can see with the unaided eye are fifth or sixth magnitude Sixth magnitude stars are 100x fainter than first magnitude stars
Anything of which greater or less can be predicated, as time, weight, force, and the like
{i} size, extent, dimensions; importance; significance; brightness of a celestial body (Astronomy)
a number assigned to the ratio of two quantities; two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other; the number of magnitudes that the quantities differ is specified to within a power of 10
quantity
length
magnitude relation
a relation between magnitudes
absolute magnitude
the apparent magnitude that a star etc. would have if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs
apparent magnitude
a numerical measure of the brightness of a star, planet etc.; a decrease of 1 unit represents an increase in the light received by a factor of 2.512
bolometric magnitude
The magnitude of a star in terms of the total amount of radiation received at all wavelengths
order of magnitude
The class of scale or magnitude of any amount, where each class contains values of a fixed ratio (most often 10) to the class preceding it. For example, something that is 2 orders of magnitude larger is 100 times larger, something that is 3 orders of magnitude larger is 1000 times larger, and something that is 6 orders of magnitude larger is a milliion times larger, because 10^2 = 100, 10^3 = 1000, and 10^6 = a million
orders of magnitude
plural form of order of magnitude
radiometric magnitude
The magnitude of a star as determined by radiometry
signed magnitude
The convention by which one bit in the representation of a number indicates the numeric sign, while the rest indicate the magnitude

The IEEE standard for floating point uses signed magnitude for the mantissa.

order of magnitude
A range of values between a designated lower value and an upper value ten times as large: "The masses of Earth and the sun differ by five orders of magnitude."
order of magnitude
(pl. orders of magnitude) An estimate of size or magnitude expressed as a power of ten: "Earth's mass is of the order of magnitude of 1022 tons; that of the sun is 1027 tons."
order of magnitude
Size or quantity
order of magnitude
A class in a system of classification determined by size, typically in powers of ten
order-of-magnitude
A range of values between a designated lower value and an upper value ten times as large: "The masses of Earth and the sun differ by five orders of magnitude."
order-of-magnitude
An estimate of size or magnitude expressed as a power of ten: "Earth's mass is of the order of magnitude of 1022 tons; that of the sun is 1027 tons."
absolute magnitude
The apparent magnitude a star would have if it were placed at a standard distance of 10 parsecs from Earth
absolute magnitude
The magnitude a star would have if it were 10 parsecs away from the Sun
absolute magnitude
(M) A measure of true luminosity of an object, defined as how bright it would appear if it were at a standard distance from earth (32 6 light-years)
absolute magnitude
1 A measure of the brightness of a star equal to the magnitude the star would have at a distance of 10 parsecs from the observer
absolute magnitude
the stellar magnitude any meteor would have if placed in the observer's zenith at a height of 100 km
absolute magnitude
The apparent magnitude a celestial body would have if placed at a distance of 10 pc (32 6 ly) from the Sun
absolute magnitude
The apparent brightness a star would have if placed at a distance of 10 parsecs from the earth Filter: This is usually a disk of coloured glass or film that sits in front of the telescope eyepiece or objective It transmits only certain wavelengths of light while rejecting others ( It is important to remember that a solar filter must always be placed in front of the objective )
absolute magnitude
Magnitude an astronomical object would have if it were at a distance of 10 parsecs
absolute magnitude
A measure of the actual brightness of a star: how bright it would be if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs
absolute magnitude
The magnitude of a celestial object as if it were 10 parsecs away
absolute magnitude
The apparent magnitude a star would have if it were at a distance of 10 parsecs (pc)
absolute magnitude
The brightness of a star if it were a standard distance from the Earth
absolute magnitude
(astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32 62 light years) from the earth
absolute magnitude
(astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32
absolute magnitude
62 light years from the earth
absolute magnitude
the brightness of an object that would be measured by an observer if the object was 10 parsecs away It is a measure of the object's luminosity
absolute magnitude
The apparent magnitude that a star would have if it were observed from a standard distance of 10 parsecs, or 32 6 light-years The absolute magnitude of the sun is 4 8
absolute magnitude
Apparent magnitude is a scale which measures how bright stars appear to be However, a more distant star could actually be brighter than a closer one, and yet because of the difference in distances, the brighter star may appear dimmer The system of absolute magnitude is defined such that the value is that which a star would give, if it were at a distance of 10 parsecs This measure is one of the actual brightness of a star The absolute magnitude with the apparent magnitude can be used to calculate the distance to a star
absolute magnitude
A scale for measuring the actual brightness of a celestial object without accounting for the distance of the object Absolute magnitude measures how bright an object would appear if it were exactly 10 parsecs (about 33 light years) away from Earth On this scale, the Sun has an absolute magnitude of +4 8 while it has an apparent magnitude of -26 7 because it is so close
absolute magnitude
The apparent magnitude that a star would possess it if were placed at a distance of 10 parsecs from Earth In this way, absolute magnitude provides a direct comparison of the brightness of stars
absolute magnitude
The intrinsic magnitude of a celestial body computed as if viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs, or 32.6 light-years
change magnitude
change in size or magnitude
change of magnitude
the act of changing the amount or size of something
magnitudes
plural of magnitude
order of magnitude
a range of values between a designated lower value and an upper value ten times as large
order of magnitude
Ten times
order of magnitude
The difference in two values measured by their logarithms The quantity 100 (log=2 0) is an order of magnitude larger than the quantity 10 (log=1 0)
order of magnitude
estimates of the values of appropriate quantities, usually made to the nearest power of ten
order of magnitude
the typical magnitude of a quantity to the nearest integral power of 10
order of magnitude
a degree in a continuum of size or quantity; "it was on the order of a mile"; "an explosion of a low order of magnitude"
order of magnitude
Two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other Each increase of one power of 10 is an increase in magnitude of 1 For example, 106 is 4 orders of magnitude above 102
order of magnitude
order of size
order of magnitude
a number assigned to the ratio of two quantities; two quantities are of the same order of magnitude if one is less than 10 times as large as the other; the number of magnitudes that the quantities differ is specified to within a power of 10
order of magnitude
A numerical approximation to the nearest power of ten
magnitude
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