harry

listen to the pronunciation of harry
Englisch - Englisch
A male given name, also used as a pet form of Henry and Harold

Henry now, what a soft swain your Henry is! the proper theme of gentle poesy; a name to fall in love withal; devoted at the font to song and sonnet, and the tender passion; a baptized inamorato; a christened hero. Call him Harry, and see how you ameliorate his condition. The man is free again, turned out of song and sonnet and romance, and young ladies' hearts. Shakspeare understood this well, when he wrote of prince Hal and Harry Hotspur. To have called them Henry would have spoiled both characters.

To bother; to trouble

We shall harry the enemy at every turn until his morale breaks and he is at our mercy.

{v} to teaze, ruffle, daunt, plunder, rob
given name, male
{i} male first name (form of Henry or Harold)
to annoy, harass
annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers"
If someone harries you, they keep bothering you or trying to get something from you. He is increasingly active in harrying the government in late-night debates. = badger, harass + harried har·ried harried businessmen scurrying from one crowded office to another. = harassed. Belafonte Harry Bertoia Harry Blackmun Harry Bridges Harry Callahan Harry Morey Coase Ronald Harry Cohn Harry Crick Francis Harry Compton Harry Lillis Crosby Haldeman Harry Robbins Harry Heine Hopkins Harry Lloyd Houdini Harry James Harry Haag Jespersen Jens Otto Harry Lewis Harry Sinclair Martinson Harry Edmund Partch Harry Sullivan Harry Stack Truman Harry S. Vardon Harry Warren Harry
To make a predatory incursion; to plunder or lay waste
make a pillaging or destructive raid on (a place), as in wartimes
To strip; to pillage; to lay waste; as, the Northmen came several times and harried the land
{f} destroy, devastate, lay waste; torment, harass, annoy
To agitate; to worry; to harrow; to harass
Harry Hun
A name used to represent the German people

So it didn't seem much of an option, leaning against a tree waiting for Harry Hun.

Harry Belafonte
orig. Harold George Belafonte, Jr. born March 1, 1927, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. singer, actor, and producer. He was born to immigrants from Martinique and Jamaica, and he lived with his mother in Jamaica from 1935 to 1940. In the early 1950s he initiated a fad for calypso music with songs such as "Day-O (Banana Boat Song)" and "Jamaica Farewell." He starred in the films Carmen Jones (1954) and Island in the Sun (1957) and later became the first black television producer. In the 1960s and '70s he was a prominent civil-rights activist. From the 1970s onward his singing career was a secondary occupation, and he acted in films such as Uptown Saturday Night (1974) and Kansas City (1996)
Harry Bertoia
born March 10, 1915, San Lorenzo, Italy died Nov. 6, 1978, Barto, Pa., U.S. Italian-born U.S. sculptor and designer. He attended the Cranbrook Academy of Art and later taught there (1937-43). He worked in California with designer Charles Eames before joining Knoll Associates in New York City in 1950. His achievements there included the Diamond Chair (commonly known as the Bertoia chair), made of polished steel wire and covered with elastic Naugahyde upholstery. He also produced "sound sculptures" that were activated by the wind and numerous works for corporations and public spaces
Harry Blackmun
born Nov. 12, 1908, Nashville, Ill., U.S. died March 4, 1999, Arlington, Va. U.S. jurist. He received his law degree from Harvard (1932) and taught law at the St. Paul College of Law (1935-41) while advancing to general partner in a Minnesota law firm. After serving as resident counsel to the Mayo Clinic (1950-59), he was appointed to the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1970 Pres. Richard Nixon named him to the Supreme Court of the United States, where he served until 1994. Perceived as a conservative when he began his Supreme Court service, Blackmun became increasingly liberal over the years. He wrote the majority decision in Roe v. Wade (1973)
Harry Bridges
orig. Alfred Bryant Renton born July 28, 1901, Kensington, near Melbourne, Vic., Austl. died March 30, 1990, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. Australian-born U.S. labour leader. He arrived in the U.S. as a seaman in 1920, and he soon settled in San Francisco and became active in the local branch of the International Longshoremen's Association (ILA). In 1937 he led the Pacific Coast division out of the ILA and reconstituted it as the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union (ILWU), affiliated with the CIO (see AFL-CIO). His aggressive labour tactics and Communist Party connections led the CIO to expel the ILWU in 1950 during a purge of allegedly communist-dominated unions, and opponents tried unsuccessfully to have Bridges deported. He retired as president of the ILWU in 1977
Harry Callahan
born Oct. 22, 1912, Detroit, Mich., U.S. died March 15, 1999, Atlanta, Ga. U.S. photographer. He had no formal training in photography and first developed an interest in it in 1938. In 1941 Ansel Adams's photographs inspired him to develop his own style. His subjects included landscapes, cityscapes, and unconventional portraits of his wife and daughter. He was best known as a teacher; he was head of the photography department at the Chicago Institute of Design (1949-61) and developed the photography department at the Rhode Island School of Design (1961-76). In 1980 two collections of his works were published, Water's Edge and Harry Callahan: Color, 1945-1980
Harry Callahan
{i} (1912-1999) famous United States photographer who is considered as one of the leading innovators of modern American photography
Harry Cohn
born July 23, 1891, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Feb. 27, 1958, Phoenix, Ariz. U.S. film producer and cofounder of Columbia Pictures. He worked for a film distributor before cofounding C.B.C. Film Sales Co. (1920), later named Columbia Pictures Corp. In 1932 he became president of the company, which he built into a major studio. Though he came to epitomize the ruthless philistine movie mogul, he was credited with discovering many stars, including Rita Hayworth, and promoting such directors as Frank Capra
Harry Edmund Martinson
born May 6, 1904, Jämshög, Swed. died Feb. 11, 1978, Stockholm Swedish novelist and poet. He spent his childhood in foster homes and his young adulthood as a merchant seaman, labourer, and vagrant. He described his early experiences in two autobiographical novels, Flowering Nettle (1935) and The Way Out (1936), and in travel sketches. Among his best-known works are the poetry collection Trade Wind (1945), the novel The Road (1948), and the epic poem Aniara (1956). In 1949 he became the first self-taught working-class writer ever elected to the Swedish Academy. He shared the 1974 Nobel Prize for Literature with Eyvind Johnson
Harry F. Klinefelter
{i} Harry Fitch Klinefelter, Jr. (born 1912), United States physician who first described the XXY syndrome in 1942
Harry Fitch Klinefelter, Jr.
{i} Harry F. Klinefelter (born 1912), United States physician who first described the XXY syndrome in 1942
Harry Haag James
born March 15, 1916, Albany, Ga., U.S. died July 5, 1983, Las Vegas, Nev. U.S. trumpeter and leader of one of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He joined Benny Goodman's band in 1937, becoming one of its principal soloists before forming his own group in late 1938. The band achieved commercial success through recordings featuring Frank Sinatra, virtuoso set pieces, and ballads performed with James's trademark wide vibrato. He married actress Betty Grable in 1943 and appeared in several films. An accomplished and technically brilliant improviser, his music from the late 1940s reflected his renewed interest in jazz, and he continued to perform with his band for more than 40 years
Harry Houdini
a US magician (=an entertainer who performs magic tricks) , who became famous for his great skill at escaping from chains, handcuffs, and locked containers, even when he was under water (1874-1926). orig. Erik Weisz born March 24, 1874, Budapest, Hung. died Oct. 31, 1926, Detroit, Mich., U.S. U.S. magician. The son of a rabbi who emigrated from Hungary to the U.S. and settled in Wisconsin, he became a trapeze performer at an early age. In 1882 he moved to New York City, where he played in vaudeville shows without much success. From about 1900 he earned an international reputation for his daring feats of escape from locked boxes, often submerged, while shackled in chains and handcuffed. His success depended on his great strength and agility and his unusual skill in manipulating locks. He exhibited his abilities in several films (1916-23). In his later years he campaigned against magicians and mind readers who claimed supernatural powers, including Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin, from whom Houdini had taken his name
Harry James
born March 15, 1916, Albany, Ga., U.S. died July 5, 1983, Las Vegas, Nev. U.S. trumpeter and leader of one of the most popular big bands of the swing era. He joined Benny Goodman's band in 1937, becoming one of its principal soloists before forming his own group in late 1938. The band achieved commercial success through recordings featuring Frank Sinatra, virtuoso set pieces, and ballads performed with James's trademark wide vibrato. He married actress Betty Grable in 1943 and appeared in several films. An accomplished and technically brilliant improviser, his music from the late 1940s reflected his renewed interest in jazz, and he continued to perform with his band for more than 40 years
Harry Klinefelter
{i} Harry F. Klinefelter (born 1912), United States physician who first described the XXY syndrome in 1942
Harry L Hopkins
born Aug. 17, 1890, Sioux City, Iowa, U.S. died Jan. 29, 1946, New York, N.Y. U.S. New Deal official. He was a social worker in New York City through the 1920s. From 1931 to 1933 he directed the state's emergency relief agency. After Franklin D. Roosevelt became president in 1933, Hopkins was appointed head of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. In 1935 he created the Works Progress Administration (WPA). After serving as U.S. commerce secretary (1938-40), he made several trips for Roosevelt to London and later to Moscow to discuss economic assistance and military strategy. In 1941 he was put in charge of the lend-lease program. He was regarded as Roosevelt's closest personal adviser during World War II
Harry Lloyd Hopkins
born Aug. 17, 1890, Sioux City, Iowa, U.S. died Jan. 29, 1946, New York, N.Y. U.S. New Deal official. He was a social worker in New York City through the 1920s. From 1931 to 1933 he directed the state's emergency relief agency. After Franklin D. Roosevelt became president in 1933, Hopkins was appointed head of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. In 1935 he created the Works Progress Administration (WPA). After serving as U.S. commerce secretary (1938-40), he made several trips for Roosevelt to London and later to Moscow to discuss economic assistance and military strategy. In 1941 he was put in charge of the lend-lease program. He was regarded as Roosevelt's closest personal adviser during World War II
Harry Martinson
born May 6, 1904, Jämshög, Swed. died Feb. 11, 1978, Stockholm Swedish novelist and poet. He spent his childhood in foster homes and his young adulthood as a merchant seaman, labourer, and vagrant. He described his early experiences in two autobiographical novels, Flowering Nettle (1935) and The Way Out (1936), and in travel sketches. Among his best-known works are the poetry collection Trade Wind (1945), the novel The Road (1948), and the epic poem Aniara (1956). In 1949 he became the first self-taught working-class writer ever elected to the Swedish Academy. He shared the 1974 Nobel Prize for Literature with Eyvind Johnson
Harry Morey Callahan
born Oct. 22, 1912, Detroit, Mich., U.S. died March 15, 1999, Atlanta, Ga. U.S. photographer. He had no formal training in photography and first developed an interest in it in 1938. In 1941 Ansel Adams's photographs inspired him to develop his own style. His subjects included landscapes, cityscapes, and unconventional portraits of his wife and daughter. He was best known as a teacher; he was head of the photography department at the Chicago Institute of Design (1949-61) and developed the photography department at the Rhode Island School of Design (1961-76). In 1980 two collections of his works were published, Water's Edge and Harry Callahan: Color, 1945-1980
Harry Partch
born June 24, 1901, Oakland, Calif., U.S. died Sept. 3, 1974, San Diego, Calif. U.S. composer and instrument maker. He grew up in Arizona and was largely self-taught musically. During the Great Depression, he traveled as a hobo, conceiving many of his musical ideas while doing so. About 1930 he began building original percussion and string instruments, tunable to 43 divisions of the octave. His works often involve theatrical elements, reflecting his interest in African, Japanese, and Native American ritual. They include Barstow 8 Hitchhiker Inscriptions from a Highway Railing at Barstow, California (1941), US Highball (1943), and And on the Seventh Day Petals Fell on Petaluma (1966)
Harry Potter
{i} name of a collection of fantasy novels written by the British author J.K. Rowling; hero and boy wizard of said fantasy novels; series of movies based on the "Harry Potter" books
Harry Potter
a boy magician (=person who uses magic) who is the main character in a very successful series of books by the British writer J.K. Rowling. Harry goes to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and he has an evil enemy, Lord Voldemort
Harry Robbins Haldeman
born Oct. 27, 1926, Los Angeles, Calif., U.S. died Nov. 12, 1993, Santa Barbara, Calif. U.S. White House aide. An advertising executive in Los Angeles (1949-68), he managed several of the campaigns of Richard Nixon, including Nixon's 1968 presidential campaign. Named White House chief of staff, he became known as the "Iron Chancellor" for his efficient management of the White House and his close control of access to the president. Along with John D. Ehrlichman, he was one of Nixon's closest advisers. He participated in the cover-up of involvement by White House officials in the Watergate break-in (see Watergate scandal) and helped carry out other "dirty tricks" during the 1972 campaign. Forced to resign in 1973, he was tried and convicted in 1975 for conspiracy, perjury, and obstruction of justice; he served 18 months in prison
Harry S Truman
a US politician in the Democratic Party who was President of the US from 1945 to 1953. He took the decision to drop nuclear bombs on Japan in 1945, and helped to establish NATO. He also organized the Marshall Plan, and began US involvement in the Korean War in 1950 (1884-1972)
Harry S Truman
(1884-1972) 33rd president of the United States (1945-1953)
Harry S Truman Research Institute for the Advancement
U.S. based institute that works towards world peace
Harry S. Truman
born May 8, 1884, Lamar, Mo., U.S. died Dec. 26, 1972, Kansas City, Mo. 33rd president of the U.S. (1945-53). He worked at various jobs before serving with distinction in World War I. He became a partner in a Kansas City haberdashery; when the business failed, he entered Democratic Party politics with the help of Thomas Pendergast. He was elected county judge (1922-24), and he later became presiding judge of the county court (1926-34). His reputation for honesty and good management gained him bipartisan support. In the U.S. Senate (1935-45), he led a committee that exposed fraud in defense production. In 1944 he was chosen to replace the incumbent Henry Wallace as the Democratic Party vice presidential nominee, and he won election with Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt. After only 82 days as vice president, he became president on Roosevelt's death (April 1945). He quickly made final arrangements for the San Francisco charter-writing meeting of the UN, helped arrange Germany's unconditional surrender on May 8, which ended World War II in Europe, and in July attended the Potsdam Conference. The Pacific war ended officially on September 2, after he ordered atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki; his justification was a report that 500,000 U.S. troops would be lost in a conventional invasion of Japan. He announced what would become known as the Truman Doctrine, which entailed aid for Greece and Turkey (1947); established the Central Intelligence Agency; and pressed for passage of the Marshall Plan to aid the economic recovery of western Europe. In the 1948 presidential election he defeated Thomas Dewey despite widespread expectation of his own defeat. On July 26, 1948, Truman issued an executive order banning segregation in the armed forces. He initiated a foreign policy of containment to restrict the Soviet Union's sphere of influence, pursued his Point Four Program, and initiated the Berlin airlift (see Berlin blockade and airlift) and the NATO pact of 1949. He sent troops under Gen. Douglas MacArthur to fight in the Korean War. Problems of pursuing the war occupied his administration until he retired. Though he was often criticized during his presidency, his reputation grew steadily in later years
Harry Sinclair Lewis
born Feb. 7, 1885, Sauk Center, Minn., U.S. died Jan. 10, 1951, near Rome, Italy U.S. novelist and social critic. He worked as a reporter and magazine writer before making his literary reputation with Main Street (1920), a portrayal of Midwestern provincialism. Among his other popular satirical novels puncturing middle-class complacency are Babbitt (1922), a scathing study of a conformist businessman; Arrowsmith (1925), a look at the medical profession; Elmer Gantry (1927), an indictment of fundamentalist religion; and Dodsworth (1929), the story of a rich American couple in Europe. He won the 1930 Nobel Prize for Literature, the first given to an American. His later novels include Cass Timberlaine (1945). Lewis's reputation declined in later years, and he lived abroad much of the time. He was married to Dorothy Thompson from 1928 to 1942
Harry Stack Sullivan
born Feb. 21, 1892, Norwich, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 14, 1949, Paris, France U.S. psychiatrist. He engaged in clinical research at the Pratt Hospital in Maryland (1923-30), pursuing his interest in the use of psychotherapy to treat schizophrenia, which he viewed as stemming from disturbed interpersonal relationships in early childhood. He asserted that psychiatric symptoms arise out of conflicts between the individual and his human environment and that personality development likewise stems from a series of interactions with other people. He helped establish the William Alanson White Psychiatric Foundation (1933) and the Washington School of Psychiatry (1936), and he also founded (1938) and served as editor of the journal Psychiatry. His works include The Interpersonal Theory of Psychiatry (1953) and The Fusion of Psychiatry and Social Science (1964)
Harry Truman
(1884-1972) 33rd president of the United States (1945-1953)
Harry Vardon
A technical innovator, he won the British Open six times (1896, 1898, 1899, 1903, 1911, and 1914) and the U.S. Open once (1900). The Vardon Trophy is awarded annually by the Professional Golfers' Association of America to the professional with the best scoring average
Harry Vardon
v. born May 9, 1870, Grouville, Jersey, Channel Islands died March 20, 1937, Totteridge, Hertfordshire, Eng. British golfer. While working as a manservant for an affluent amateur golfer on the island of Jersey, Vardon learned golf, and he turned professional at age
Harry Warren
orig. Salvatore Guaragna born Dec. 24, 1893, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. died Sept. 22, 1981, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. songwriter. The youngest of 12 children, Warren was self-taught musically. He toured with brass bands and carnivals from age
Harry Warren
After a few years as a song plugger in Tin Pan Alley, he began contributing tunes to Broadway musicals, including "You're My Everything" and "I Found a Million Dollar Baby in a Five-and-Ten-Cent Store." In 1932 he moved to Hollywood, where he collaborated on films such as Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933), 42nd Street (1933), Down Argentine Way (1940), and Sun Valley Serenade (1941; with "Chattanooga Choo-Choo"), and he received Academy Awards for the songs "Lullaby of Broadway," "You'll Never Know," and "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe." Between 1935 and 1950 he wrote more top-10 hit songs than any other songwriter
Dirty Harry
A police officer who is reckless, disregards practices and policies, or who practices vigilantism, or has a questionable use of force and officer involved shooting incidents
Old Harry
The Devil
Tom, Dick or Harry
Anybody or everybody; random or unknown people

We want the place to be accessible to any Tom, Dick or Harry that happens to find it.

harried
Simple past tense and past participle of harry
play Old Harry
To play the devil; to make mischief

Blenkiron and I have been moving in the best circles as skilled American engineers who are going to play Old Harry with the British on the Tigris. — John Buchan, Greenmantle, 1916.

Francis Harry Compton Crick
born June 8, 1916, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Eng. British biophysicist. Educated at University College, London, he helped develop magnetic mines for naval use during World War II but returned to biology after the war. He worked at Cambridge University with James D. Watson and Maurice Wilkins to construct a molecular model of DNA consistent with its known physical and chemical properties, work for which the three shared a 1962 Nobel Prize. Crick also discovered that each group of three bases (a codon) on a single DNA strand designates the position of a specific amino acid on the backbone of a protein molecule, and he helped determine which codons code for each amino acid normally found in protein, thus clarifying the way the cell uses DNA to build proteins. See also Rosalind Franklin
Jens Otto Harry Jespersen
born July 16, 1860, Randers, Den. died April 30, 1943, Roskilde Danish linguist. He led a movement for basing foreign-language teaching on conversational speech rather than textbook study of grammar and vocabulary, helping to revolutionize language teaching in Europe. An authority on English grammar, Jespersen contributed greatly to the advancement of phonetics and linguistic theory. His many published works include Modern English Grammar, 7 vol. (1909-49), Language: Its Nature, Development, and Origin (1922), and The Philosophy of Grammar (1924). He originated Novial, an international language
Jens Otto Harry Jespersen
{i} Otto Jespersen (1860-1943), Danish linguist
Prince Harry
the younger son of Prince Charles and Princess Diana. His official name is Prince Henry (1984-). Harry, Prince
Ronald Harry Coase
born Dec. 29, 1910, Willesden, Middlesex, Eng. British-U.S. economist. He received his doctorate from the London School of Economics and taught principally there and the University of Chicago. In his best-known paper, "The Problem of Social Cost" (1960), he challenged the classical logic of prohibiting behaviour that damages others. He argued that legal scholars should focus on the importance of an efficient marketplace and on negotiation rather than litigation. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1991
Tom, Dick and Harry
every person, anyone
Tom, Dick, and Harry
Anybody at all; a member of the public at large: It's not a smart idea to admit every Tom, Dick, and Harry to the party
every Tom, Dick and Harry
every person, anyone, every person possible
harried
Rushed; panicked; overly busy or preoccupied
harried
past of harry
harried
troubled persistently especially with petty annoyances; "harassed working mothers"; "a harried expression"; "her poor pestered father had to endure her constant interruptions"; "the vexed parents of an unruly teenager"
harried
{s} harassed, bothered, hassled, tormented; annoyed
harry
Favoriten