ınterchange

listen to the pronunciation of ınterchange
Englisch - Türkisch
Englisch - Englisch
{v} to exchange, barter, succeed to
{n} an exchange
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A 7-bit character set and character encoding, abbreviated ASCII. Based on the Roman alphabet as used in modern English, the code is employed almost universally on computing machinery
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A set of 128 alphanumeric and special control characters ASCII files are also known as plain text files This is the de-facto world-wide standard for the code numbers used by computers to represent all the upper and lower-case Latin letters, numbers, punctuation marks, etc
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A coding scheme using 7 or 8 bits that assigns numeric values up to 256 characters, including letters, numerals, punctuation marks, control characters, and other symbols ASCII was developed in 1968 to standardize data transmission among disparate hardware and software systems and is built into most minicomputers and all personal computers
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A standard character-to-number encoding widely used in the computer industry See also: EBCDIC [Source: RFC1392]
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A standard code used in data transmission in which 128 symbols are each represented by a binary number
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
The predominant character set encoding of present-day computers ASCII uses 7 bits for each character It does not include accented letters or any other letter forms not used in English (such as the German sharp-S or the Norwegian ae-ligature) Compare to Unicode
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
The character set used by most American computers Supersets of ASCII contain non-English characters
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASCII (pronounced ass-key) is the standard character set displayed by most computers; it's what you see in e-mail messages Thus the somewhat redundant phrase "plain ascii" to denote text that has no special fonts or graphics elements
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A standard character-to-number encoding widely used in the computer industry
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASCII is also sometimes called TTY because of its heritage in the teletype industry ASCII is used to represent characters, numbers, and control codes It is the most commonly recognized standard among the general PC and minicomputer users
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
Basic computer characters accepted by all American machines and many foreign ones
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
(ASCII) The primary encoding character set used in computers The current version has 7 bits per character 8-bit "words" or character codes provide a bit that can be used as a check bit to help verify that the remaining 7 bits are correct
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
Pronounced 'ask-ee', a code used by computers to represent alphanumeric characters and some punctuation marks Each character is represented by a 7-digit binary number, 0000000 to 1111111, giving a total character set of 128 E-mail messages sent over the Internet take ASCII form, meaning that some kind of conversion is often required
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A 7-bit binary code standardized by American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for use by personal computers (PCs) and some mainframes to represent alphanumeric and graphical characters An additional bit is included to form an 8-bit character (byte)
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A code with seven information signals plus one parity check signal, designed for interworking between computers (i e , the transmittal of text) The most popular coding method used by computers for converting letters, numbers, punctuation and control codes with digital form
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A 7-bit binary code, providing 128 different binary combinations for standard American keyboards ASCII is used to encode all 26 letters of the alphabet (upper and lower case), all ten decimal digits (0 to 9), punctuation marks, standard graphics, and special control codes into machine language Although ASCII has 128 different codes, only 7 bits are needed for each different code ASCII characters are generally stored inside 8-bit bytes, providing room for the 128 ASCII codes plus another 128 codes, totaling 256 characters This 8-bit code is referred to as EXTENDED ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A scheme that provides standard numeric values to represent letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other characters The use of standard values allows computers and computer programs to exchange data
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
The character-oriented code widely used in data processing and data communications systems
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASCII standard, standard character set for letters and symbols
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A seven-bit binary code standardized by ANSI for use by personal computers and some mainframes to represent alphanumeric and graphical characters
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASCII - Alphanumeric characters are represented by numbers from 0 to 127 and translated into a 7-bit binary code ASCII allows for easy transfer of text-only files between different kinds of computers
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
(ASCII) is a code for representing English characters as numbers, with each character assigned a number from 0-127 ASCII file A text file in which each byte represents one character according to the ASCII code ASCII files are sometimes called plain text files
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A seven bit encoding scheme (8 bits including parity check) that describes a coded character set used for the iformation interchange among data processing and communication systems The character set includes control and graphical characters
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
The code numbers used by computers to represent all the upper and lower-case Latin letters, numbers, punctuation, etc A plain text document with no other formatting is also called an ASCII file
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A standard character-to-number encoding widely used in the computer industry Plain text, Postscript files, and BinHex files are among the types of data that are transferred in ASCII format Spreadsheets, compiled programs, and graphics are transferred across the net in binary format In addition, the computer community has extended the ASCII character set so it includes control and other characters This change allowed for e-mail, "8-bit clean" data transmission, essential for the development of workstation TCP/IP applications This lets users turn their home computers into Internet hosts
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ASCII is a standard seven-bit code that was proposed by ANSI in 1963, and finalized in 1968 Standard ASCII assigns the numbers 0-127 to different alphabetic and control characters Extended ASCII, extends this character set to 256 to include non-English and graphic characters
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
A common method of numbering characters so they can be processed For instance, the letter A is number 65 It is slowly being replaced by the ANSI character set table and the use of international code pages that can display foreign characters
Audio Interchange File Format
(Computers) format for storing high quality music and audio samples (developed by Apple, used on both Macintosh and PC)
Electronic Data Interchange
transmission of standard electronic documents between computer systems of companies or business organizations, EDI
Graphics Interchange Format
format of a graphic file
ınterchange
Favoriten