run up to

listen to the pronunciation of run up to
English - English

Definition of run up to in English English dictionary

run to
To reach the limit of one's abilities or tastes

I don't think my carpentry runs to making a window.

run to
To reach a particular maximum amount, size, value, etc

The repairs ran to 1,200 Euros.

run up
To make something, usually an item of clothing, very quickly

I'll run you up a skirt for tomorrow evening.

run up
To accumulate a debt

He ran up over 5,000 $ in unpaid bills.

run up
To bring a flag to the top of it's flag pole
run up
the action of running up; the area of the pitch used by the bowler to run up, the start of which he marks with a small marker
run up
of a bowler, to run, or walk up to the bowling crease in order to bowl a ball
run to
(deyim) Be sufficient for

My income doesn't run to luxuries.

run to
If you run to someone, you go to them for help or to tell them something. If you were at a party and somebody was getting high, you didn't go running to a cop
run to
If something runs to a particular amount or size, it is that amount or size. The finished manuscript ran to the best part of fifty double-sided pages
run to
If you cannot run to a particular item, you cannot afford to buy it or pay for it. If you can't run to champagne, buy sparkling wine. = afford
run up
as of debts or scores make by sewing together quickly; "run up a skirt
run up
fasten by sewing; do needlework
run up
accumulate as a debt; "he chalked up $100 in the course of the evening"
run up
raise; "hoist the flags"; "hoist a sail"
run up
as of debts or scores
run up
perform quickly; cause an increase; accumulate quickly
run up
1. If someone runs up bills or debts, they acquire them by buying a lot of things or borrowing money. He ran up a £1,400 bill at the Britannia Adelphi Hotel see also run-up
run up
make by sewing together quickly; "run up a skirt"
run up to

    Turkish pronunciation

    rʌn ʌp tı

    Pronunciation

    /ˈrən ˈəp tə/ /ˈrʌn ˈʌp tə/

    Etymology

    [ 'r&n ] (verb.) before 12th century. Middle English ronnen, alteration of rinnen, v.i. & of rennen, v.t., from Old Norse renna; akin to Old High German rinnan, v.i., to run, Sanskrit rinAti he causes to flow, and probably to Latin rivus stream.

    Videos

    ... It may be that users take control of their legs to run up to someone and kick them in ...

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