a mood

listen to the pronunciation of a mood
English - Turkish

Definition of a mood in English Turkish dictionary

mood
{i} ruh hali

O kötü bir ruh hali içinde, bu onun için nadirdi. - He was in a bad mood, which was rare for him.

O kötü bir ruh hali içinde. - She is in a bad mood.

humour
{i} mizah

Onun mizahı çok duygusuz. - His humour is very deadpan.

O kitabı yazan kişi hem mizah hem de ince espriye sahiptir, değil mi? - The person who wrote that book is possessed of both humour and wit, isn't he?

mood
ruh durumu
mood
kip
humour
gönlünü yapmak
humour
huyuna suyuna gitmek
humour
(Tıp) hümor
humour
gülmece
mood
mizaç
mood
ruhi durum
mood
haleti ruhiye
mood
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) duygudurum
mood
atmosfer
mood
mood
humour
eğlendirmek
humour
mizaç
humour
komiklik
humour
huy
mood
huysuzluk
mood
hava

Gerçekten bunun için havamda değilim. - I'm really not in the mood for this.

Tom katılmak için havasında görünmüyor. - Tom seems to be in no mood to participate.

mood
aksilik
mood
haletiruhiye
mood
(Psikoloji, Ruhbilim) Duygudurum, duygusal durum, ruh hali, halet-i ruhiyye
humour
mizah, karikatür sitesinden çok sayıda sanatsal karikatürü ücretsiz indirebilir, kullanabilirsiniz
humour
suyuk/huy/şakacılık
humour
mizah,v.eğlendir: n.mizah
humour
{i} ruh hali
humour
{i} espri anlayışı

Almanların espri anlayışı yok mu? Bunu komik bulmuyorum! - Germans have no sense of humour? I don't find that funny!

Tom'un asıl problemi onun espri anlayışının olmamasıdır. - Tom's main problem is he has no sense of humour.

humour
{i} keyif
humour
{f} hoşuna gitmek
humour
hoşnut et
humour
(fiil) memnun etmek, hoşuna gitmek, suyuna gitmek, ayak uydurmak, alttan almak
humour
{f} alttan almak
humour
{i} salgı
mood
i., dilb. kip
mood
(Tıp) Haletiruhiye, ruh haleti, hal
mood
(Tıp) Huy, mizaç, meşrep
mood
ruhsal durum
mood
hal

O seninle konuşmayı reddedebilir çünkü o çok kötü bir ruh hali içinde. - She may well refuse to speak to you because she's in a very bad mood.

Tom yorgun ve kötü bir ruh hali içindeydi. - Tom was tired and in a bad mood.

mood
{i} çoğ. terslik, huysuzluk, karamsarlık
mood
kip/aksilik/hava
mood
(Tıp) () Hiddet, terslik, huysuzluk
mood
(müzik) makam
mood
karamsarlık
mood
in the mood for e hazır
mood
bir önermede esaslar ile neticeler arasındaki bağlantı
English - English
humour
mood
Disposition to do something

I'm not in the mood for running today.

mood
A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality

The most common mood in English is the indicative.

mood
A good mood
mood
{n} a temper of mind, a term in grammar
mood
Refers to the emotional tone pervading a section or the whole literary work, which fosters in the reader expectations as to the course of events, whether happy or disastrous
mood
mental or emotional state, composure
mood
A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker's or writer's wish, intent, or assertion about reality
mood
disposition, as in: The crowd was in a joyous mood
mood
A feeling state or prolonged emotion that influences the whole of one's psychic life
mood
The feeling a work of art gives
mood
without regard to other accidents, such as time, person, number, etc
mood
the dominant atmosphere of a literary work [top]
mood
A pervasive and sustained emotion that colors the perception of the world Common examples of mood include depression, elation, anger, and anxiety
mood
The prevailing emotions of a work or of the author in his or her creation of the work The mood of a work is not always what might be expected based on its subject matter The poem "Dover Beach" by Matthew Arnold offers examples of two different moods originating from the same experience: watching the ocean at night The mood of the first three lines The sea is calm tonightThe tide is full, the moon lies fairUpon the straights is in sharp contrast to the mood of the last three lines And we are here as on a darkling plainSwept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,Where ignorant armies clash by night
mood
See Mode which is the preferable form
mood
a term applied to sentences and verbs to signal a wide range of meanings, especially speaker's attitude to the factual content of utterances, e g certainty, possibility (e g Sam must/may be at home) The distinction between active and passive sentences/verbs is also sometimes considered a mood
mood
verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
mood
a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"
mood
The attitude of the characters in a story toward what is happening  
mood
The atmosphere created by the literature and accomplished through word choice (diction) Syntax is often a creator of mood since word order, sentence length and strength and complexity also affect pacing and therefore mood Setting, tone, and events can all affect the mood
mood
Manner of conceiving and expressing action or being, as positive, possible, hypothetical, etc
mood
A bad mood

I wonder whether or not Tom is in a bad mood. - I wonder whether Tom is in a bad mood.

Judging from his expression, he is in a bad mood. - Judging from his expression, he's in a bad mood.

mood
The patient's subjective experience of how they are feeling emotionally Distinguished from affect, the external expression of emotional feeling which is observed by others
mood
predominant feeling state - in the extreme will effect the perception of external events
mood
Same as Mode
mood
Manner; style; mode; logical form; musical style; manner of action or being
mood
n 1 A temporary state of mind or feeling, as evidenced by the tendency of one's thoughts 2 A pervading impression on the feelings of an observer
mood
The mood of a place is the general impression that you get of it. First set the mood with music = atmosphere
mood
Temper of mind; temporary state of the mind in regard to passion or feeling; humor; as, a melancholy mood; a suppliant mood
mood
A variable verb function expressing predication (indicative), command (imperative), potential or volition (subjunctive) or will (infinitive)
mood
a particular set of inflectional forms of a verb to express whether the action or state it denotes is conceived as fact or in some other manner (as command, possibility, or wish) English and Welsh both have four moods: indicative, imperative, subjunctive, and good
mood
as, the indicative mood; the infinitive mood; the subjunctive mood
mood
The overall demeanor of both disputants
mood
(L modus measure) the grammatical encoding of the speaker's perspective: types of knowing (epistemic mood) and types of desiring (deontic mood)
mood
The state of mind or feeling communicated in a work of art, frequently through color
mood
The atmosphere created for the reader by a text
mood
Your mood is the way you are feeling at a particular time. If you are in a good mood, you feel cheerful. If you are in a bad mood, you feel angry and impatient. He is clearly in a good mood today When he came back, he was in a foul mood His moods swing alarmingly. If you say that you are in the mood for something, you mean that you want to do it or have it. If you say that you are in no mood to do something, you mean that you do not want to do it or have it. After a day of air and activity, you should be in the mood for a good meal He was in no mood to celebrate
mood
{i} state of mind, predominant emotion; type of verb inflection (Grammar)
mood
The emotional tone of the play
mood
If someone is in a mood, the way they are behaving shows that they are feeling angry and impatient. She was obviously in a mood. = temper
mood
The mood of a group of people is the way that they think and feel about an idea, event, or question at a particular time. They largely misread the mood of the electorate
mood
In grammar, the mood of a clause is the way in which the verb forms are used to show whether the clause is, for example, a statement, a question, or an instruction. or mode In grammar, a category that reflects the speaker's view of an event's reality, likelihood, or urgency. Often marked by special verb forms (inflections), moods include the indicative, for factual or neutral situations (e.g., "You did your work"); the imperative, to convey commands or requests ("Do your work"); and the subjunctive. The subjunctive's functions vary widely. It may express doubt, possibility, necessity, desire, or future time. In English it often indicates a condition contrary to fact (e.g., "If he were to work here, he would have to learn to be punctual")
mood
Mood in verbs refers to one of three attitudes that a writer or speaker has to what is being written or spoken The indicative mood, which describes virtually every sentence on this page, is used to make a statement or ask a question The imperative mood is used when we're feeling sort of bossish and want to give a directive, strong suggestion, or order: Get your homework done before you watch television tonight Please include cash payment with your order form Get out of town! Notice that there is no subject in these sentences The pronoun you (singular or plural, depending on context) is the "understood subject" in imperative sentences Virtually all imperative sentences, then, have a second person (singular or plural) subject The sole exception is the first person construction, which includes an objective form as subject: "Let's (or Let us) work on these things together "
mood
(Anglo-Saxon, mod "heart" or "spirit"): A feeling, emotional state, or disposition of mind--especially the predominating atmosphere or tone of a literary work Most pieces of literature have a prevailing mood, but shifts in this prevailing mood may function as a counterpoint, provide comic relief, or echo the changing events in the plot The term mood is often used synonymously with atmosphere and ambiance
mood
this word refers to the way in which a verb is used in a sentence: to describe whether something was done by someone (the active mood) or done to him/her (the passive mood) For example, in 'She praised the pupil' the verb is in the active mood, whereas in: 'The pupil was praised by her' the verb is in the passive mood
mood
the prevailing psychological state; "the climate of opinion"; "the national mood had changed radically since the last election"
mood
– The feeling created by a piece of music
Turkish - English

Definition of a mood in Turkish English dictionary

mood
mood
a mood

    Turkish pronunciation

    ı mud

    Pronunciation

    /ə ˈmo͞od/ /ə ˈmuːd/

    Videos

    ... their mood is kind of in the toilet. ...
    ... you're in the mood for. ...

    Word of the day

    warlock
Favorites