dyke

listen to the pronunciation of dyke
Türkçe - Türkçe

dyke teriminin Türkçe Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

dike
istanbul limanı içerisinde, Sarayburnu ile Beşiktaş arasından geçen hattın Haliç tarafında kalan balık alanına verilen ad
İngilizce - İngilizce
a valley

Let's walk to Devil's Dyke.

a ditch
A lesbian, particularly one who appears masculine or acts in a masculine manner. This word has been reclaimed, by some, as politically empowering. (See usage notes.)
A toilet
Alternative spelling of dike
narrow body of igneous rock cutting across structure of the adjacent country rocks
Thin vertical veins of igneous rock that form when magma enters and cools in fractures found within the crust Also see intrusive igneous rock
an igneous intrusion which cuts across the bedding of other planar structures in the country rock
enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
A lesbian. This word has been reclaimed, by some, as politically empowering. (See usage notes.)
offensive terms for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
The spelling dyke is restricted by some to the geological meaning
A dyke is a lesbian. Variant of dike. Offa's Dyke Van Dyke Dick Richard Wayne Van Dyke
A crosscutting rock unit that is younger than the rocks it intrudes
{i} protective wall, rampart; drainage channel; (Slang) lesbian
A tabular, near vertical, minor igneous intrusion that cuts across horizontal to gently dipping planar structures in the host rock
a vertical (up and down) run of molten rock that has cooled and become solid These are normally found through layers of rock
The spelling dike is also used, especially for meaning 1
A vertical sheet of igneous rock filling a fissure in the rocks
A long mass of eruptive rock, a dyke (vein) may consist of mineral deposits located between other rocks
A sheet-like body of igneous rock which cuts across the bedding of the rocks it intrudes; it is often steeply inclined
A dyke is a thick wall that is built to stop water flooding onto very low-lying land from a river or from the sea
{f} build a protective wall, construct a rampart; dig a drainage channel
a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
An artificial embankment constructed to prevent flooding
An earthwork or fortification comprising a ditch (and possibly a rampart)
Dike
A topographic surname for someone living near a dike
Dikê
The goddess personifying the principle of justice

Dolos and Dikê in Sophokles’ Elektra.

Dikē
Alternative spelling of Dikê
baby dyke
A young lesbian
bull dyke
a macho or a extremely masculine lesbian
bull-dyke
Attributive form of bull dyke, noun
dike
A barrier of stone or earth used to hold back water and prevent flooding

The king of Texcuco advised the building of a great dike, so thick and strong as to keep out the water.

dike
A body of once molten igneous rock that was injected into older rocks in a manner that crosses bedding planes
dike
A lesbian, especially a manly or unattractive lesbian
dike
A ditch and bank running alongside each other
dykey
Of a woman, whether actually lesbian or not, having stereotypically lesbian characteristics
dike
{n} a ditch, channel, bank, mound, fence
Dick Van Dyke
v. orig. Richard Wayne Van Dyke born Dec. 13, 1925, West Plains, Mo., U.S. U.S. actor and comedian. In 1947-53 he played in nightclubs with his pantomime act, "The Merry Mutes," before making his Broadway debut in 1959. He starred in the musical Bye Bye Birdie (1960-61, Tony Award; film, 1963), and then in the successful television comedy series The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961-66) winning several Emmy Awards The New Dick Van Dyke Show (1971-74), and the drama series Diagnosis Murder (1993-2001). He has starred in such movies as Mary Poppins (1964) and Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang (1968)
Offa's Dyke
a long wall of earth, originally over 100 miles long, put up to mark the border between Wales and the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia, by King Offa of Mercia in the 8th century. Parts of it can still be seen. Earthwork in western England. It stretches 169 mi (270 km) from the River Severn near Chepstow to the seaward end of the River Dee's estuary. It was built by Offa of Mercia to fortify the boundary between his kingdom and the lands of the Welsh; for centuries it marked the England-Wales boundary. It consisted of a plain bank (in places some 60 ft [18 m] high) and a ditch (12 ft [3.7 m] deep). Many sections remain, and a walking path now runs its length
bull dyke
Used as a disparaging term for a lesbian, especially one exhibiting behavior associated with stereotypically masculine traits
dike
To surround or protect with a dike or dry bank; to secure with a bank
dike
An artificial watercourse (ditch) Also, a bank usually of earth constructed to control or confine water (levee); raised causeway
dike
A ditch and bank running alongside each other (the excavation was the soruce of the material of the embankment.)
dike
An embankment to prevent inundations; a levee
dike
Bank of earth or stone used to form a barrier, frequently and confusingly interchanged with levee A dike restrains water within an area that normally is flooded See levee
dike
{f} build a dike; protect with an embankment; drain with a canal or ditch
dike
A bank (usually earthen) constructed to control or confine water
dike
a bank, usually of earth, built to control or confine water
dike
A tabular body of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rocks or cuts massive rocks A massive wall or embankment built around a low-lying area to prevent flooding (Bates & Jackson 1984)
dike
The northern English form of ditch
dike
(1) (Engineering) An embankment to confine or control water, especially one built along the banks of a river to prevent overflow of lowlands; a levee (2) A low wall that can act as a barrier to prevent a spill from spreading (3) (Geology) A tabular body of igneous (formed by volcanic action) rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rocks or cuts adjacent rocks
dike
an embankment built to prevent overflow of water from a stream or other water body; an embankment built to retain water in a reservoir; a vertical or steeply inclined wall of igneous rock, which has been forced into a fissure in a molten condition
dike
see dyke. Variant of dyke. another spelling of dyke. Bank, usually of earth, constructed to control or confine water. Dikes were purely defensive at first but later became a means to acquire polders (tracts of land reclaimed from a body of water through the construction of offshore dikes roughly parallel to the shoreline). After a dike is built, the polder is drained by pumping out the water. Where the land surface is above low-tide level, tide gates discharge water into the sea at low tide and automatically close to prevent reentry of seawater at high tide. To reclaim lands that are below low-tide level, the water must be pumped over the dikes. The most notable example of polder construction is the system adjacent to Holland's IJsselmeer (Zuider Zee) barrier dam. If The Netherlands were to lose the protection of its dikes, its most densely populated portion would be inundated by the sea and rivers
dike
{i} digue
dike
Rising magma cooling underground which cuts vertically across exisiting rock Dikes and sills of Keweenawan time arose among the older Rove Formation which runs from Gunflint Lake east to Superior (our BWCA Region V) More resistant to erosion and glaciation than the surrounding rock, they delineate the long and narrow lakes which are the hallmark of this region
dike
offensive terms for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
dike
{i} embankment constructed to control water, earthwork, rampart, canal
dike
A ditch; a channel for water made by digging
dike
Sometimes written as dyke; earth structure along sea or river in order to protect littoral lands from flooding by high water; dikes along rivers are sometimes called levees
dike
a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
dike
Sometimes written as dyke; earth structure along a SEA or RIVER in order to protect LITTORAL lands from flooding by high water; dikes along RIVERS are sometimes called LEVEES
dike
To work as a ditcher; to dig
dike
A barrier constructed to control or confine hazardous substances and prevent them from entering sewers, ditches, streams or other flowing waters
dike
A tabular intrusive rock that cuts across strata or other structural features of the surrounding rock
dike
An embankment to confine or control water, often built along the banks of a river to prevent overflow of lowlands; a levee
dike
A sheet or wall-like mass of igneous rock that cuts across other rocks
dike
A discordant pluton that is substantially wider than it is thick Dikes are often steeply inclined or nearly vertical See also sill dilatancy The expansion of a rock's volume caused by stress and deformation
dike
an earthen embankment constructed to retain floodwater; when used in conjunction with a bridge, it prevents stream erosion and localized scour and/or so directs the stream current such that debris does not accumulate; also known as dyke; see SPUR DIKE
dike
to enclose, protect, or provide with a dike, an embankment built to prevent flooding
dike
An embankment to confine or control water A Levee
dike
An embankment constructed of earth or other suitable materials to protect land against overflow from streams, lakes, or tidal influences or to protect flat land areas from diffused surface water
dike
An embankment used to confine or control water, especially one built along the banks of a river to prevent overflow of low lands or to deflect water away from a bank Also called a levee (4)
dike
A low embankment, usually constructed to close up low areas of the reservoir rim and thus limit the extent of the reservoir Embankment for restraining a river or a stream Embankments which contain water within a given course Usually applied to dams built to protect land from flooding
dike
Anything constructed, assembled or installed to prevent flooding of land It may be an embankment, a wall, fill of sand, gravel, clay, silt or rocks pilings, pipe sluice, culvert, canal, ditch, drain, pump, gate or flood box
dike
A wall of turf or stone
dike
To drain by a dike or ditch
dike
enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
dike
enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water
dike
A wall-like mass of mineral matter, usually an intrusion of igneous rocks, filling up rents or fissures in the original strata
dike
A barrier constructed to control or confine hazardous substances and prevent them from entering sewers, ditches, steams, or other flowing waters
dykes
plural of dyke
dyke