canon

listen to the pronunciation of canon
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} kilise yetkililerinin çıkardığı bir kanun
katedral rahibi
kanon müzik
kanyon
(Kanun) kaide
{i} kanun
{i} kilise heyeti üyesi
{i} kilise kanunu
{i} kanon [müz.]
{i} kriter
{i} ölçüt
{i} genel kural
{i} azizler listesi
{i} kırk sekiz puntoluk harf
{i} ilke
{i} kutsal kitaplar
{i} kural
{i} bir katedrale bağlı olan papaz
kilise yasası/rahip/ilke
esas
derin vadi
kanon
canon law
kanun
canon finetech inc.
Hristiyan finetech inç
canon law
fıkıh
canon.
Hristiyan
Canon law
ahkâm ı diniye
Canon law
kilise kanunu
canon av device
(Bilgisayar) canon av aygıtı
canon dv device
(Bilgisayar) canon dv aygıtı
canon law
kilise hukuku
cannon
{i} bombardıman silahı
cannon
{i} top

Kendi toplarının gürlemesi son derece gürültülüydü. - The roar of their own cannons was extremely loud.

Sen Tom'un büyük kasları mı var sanıyorsun? Ben bu kollar altında gerçek toplar paketliyorum! - You think Tom's got big muscles? I'm packing literal cannons beneath these sleeves!

cannon
{i} mil
cannon
(Spor) bilardo karambol
cannon
karambol bilardo
cannon
(Askeri) büyük top
cannon
çarpmak
cannon
hızla vurmak
present in a canon of scripture
kutsal bir kanon mevcut
cannon
i., ask. top
cannon
bombardıman etmek
cannon
gülle gibi fırlatmak
cannon
top,v.topa tut: n.top
cannon
(Askeri) TOP: Bir top, obüs veya havan ana parçasını teşkil eden bir top namlusu ile bir kama tertibatı, ateşleme tertibatı veya dip kapağından ibaret, komple parça. Namlu ağzına takılan ek parçalar buna da dahildir
cannon
karambol yapmak
cannon
{i} incik kemiği
cannon
cannon bon
cannon
çarpışmak
cannon
topa tutmak
cannon
{i} karambol (bilardo)
cannon
bir şaft üzerinde serbestçe hareket eden bilardo oyununda karambol
cannon
koşum takımında bir çeşit gem
cannon
cannon ball gülle
İngilizce - İngilizce
A eucharistic prayer, particularly, the Roman Canon
A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field

Can we this quote? the durable canon of American short fiction — William Styron.

The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic

the entire Shakespeare canon.

A religious law or body of law decreed by the church

We must proceed according to canon law.

A generally accepted principle

The trial must proceed according to the canons of law.

A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times

Pachelbel’s Canon has become very popular.

Those sources, especially including literary works, which are generally considered authoritative regarding a given fictional universe
A member of a cathedral chapter
any rule or law
{n} a rule, law, dignitary of the Church
{i} Japanese corporation founded in 1937 and headquartered in Tokyo, world-renowned manufacturer of a wide variety of optical and imaging products (such as cameras, lenses, digital video cameras, etc.) and business machines (such as printers, copy machines, computer printers, laser facsimiles, etc.)
A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject
the title of a priest who serves on the staff cathedral, except that the head staff priest of the cathedral is the dean; the canon is addressed as "The Rev Canon Jane H Wilson" Salutation in letter: "Dear Canon Wilson" or "Dear Ms Wilson"
Strict imitative polyphony, with the identical melody appearing in each voice, but at staggered intervals; standard in vocal polyphony
A member of a cathedral chapter; a person who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church
In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order
a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
when applied to an individual author, canon means the sum total of works verifiably written by that author When used generally, it means the range of works that a consensus of scholars, teachers, and readers of a particular time and culture consider "great" or "major " This second sense of the word is a matter of much debate since the literary canon in Europe and America has long been dominated by the works of white heterosexual men During the last thirty years, the canon in the United States has expanded considerably to include more women and writers from various ethnic and racial backgrounds Close Window
The part of a bell by which it is suspended; called also ear and shank
The collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures
A musical or dance composition in which two or more parts recur, repeat, or interrelate with each other
{i} church law; accepted principle, criterion; list of Christian saints; books of the Bible recognized by the Christian church; clergyman, religious cleric; (Music) contrapuntal piece of music in which one musical line of a melody is imitated in an accurate manner in other parts
someone's list of authors or works considered to be "classic," that is, central to the identity of a given literary tradition or culture
or "unchanging [rule of] prayer," similar to "anaphora " The core part of the Mass wherein is enacted the whole remembrance of Christ's ministry, suffering, death, resurrection, and ascension, including the consecration of the Body and Blood of Christ In W Rite, it does not begin until the "Thee, therefore," since the preface after "Lift up your hearts" continually changes It concludes with the singing of the Our Father
a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
The word canon comes from the name of a reed that grows straight enough that it can be used as a measuring stick Therefore, a canon is a standard or norm The by-laws of the ancient Church were called canons When we speak of the canon of scripture, we mean the standard list of books that are recognized by the Church as Holy Scripture
The works considered factual or official, usually within a specific franchise, which defines events, characters, etc. that are considered to have existence within the fictional universe
A law or rule
In a literary sense, the authoritative works of a particular writer; also, an accepted list of works perceived to represent a cultural, ideological, historical, or biblical grouping Sidelight: Other literary groupings or collections include sonnet sequences, lyric sequences, cycles, companion poems, and anthologies
A canon is a member of the clergy who is on the staff of a cathedral. Musical form and compositional technique. Canons are characterized by having a melody that is imitated at a specified time interval by one or more parts, either at the same pitch or at some other pitch. Imitation may occur in the same note values, in augmentation (longer notes), or in diminution (shorter notes); in retrograde order (beginning at its end), mirror inversion (each ascending melodic interval becoming a descending interval, and vice versa), or retrograde mirror inversion; and so on. Canons range from folk rounds such as "Three Blind Mice" and "Frère Jacques" to the massively complex canons of Johann Sebastian Bach
See Canonical books, under Canonical, a
One of a body of dignitaries attached to a cathedral or a collegiate church, or a member of certain religious orders [8]
It is the strictest form of imitation
The authorized collection of material constituting the sacred writings of a religious community; the material is believed to have special, usually divine, authority; the Hebrew Bible is the canon of the Jewish community; the Old and New Testaments (respectively with and without the Apocrypha) are the canon of the Roman Catholic and Protestant Christian communities See Introduction
A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church
a type of counterpoint where one musical phrase is played at the same time as itself at another interval in time, the first voice is called the antecedent and the second the consequent
A polyphonic composition in which one part is imitated by one or more other parts that eventually overlap
in ancient times, an historical record of events In modern astronomy, a canon is a listing of celestial events, such as eclipses, over a period of time
a member of clergy on the staff of a cathedral or collegiate church, or a title of honour within a diocese
The term comes from the Greek word kannon, that means "measuring rod or ruler " In the Church we speak of canon law, the canon of Scripture, and people called canons The canon of Scripture refers to the books of the Bible that are accepted as genuine and inspired by God When used in reference to people, a canon is the title of a priest who either serves on the staff of a cathedral, or who has exhibited exemplary service to a diocese
The strictest form of imitation, in which two or more parts have the same melody but start at different points
The method of composition for several voices in which different voices sing the same melody, one after the other, in either the same or different degrees of the scale
From the Greek meaning a "rule" or "standard " In architecture it is a standard of proportion In literature it is the authentic list of an author's works In music it is the melodic line sung by overlapping voices in strict imitation In religious terms it represents the authentic books in the Bible or the authoritative prayer of the Eucharist in the Mass or the authoritative law of the church promulgated by ecclesiastical authority
A body of writing that is recognised by authority Books of holy scripture accepted by religious leaders as genuine are cannonical, as are works of a literary author which are regarded by scholars as authentic The canon of a national literature is the body of writings particularly approved by critics and anthologists which are deemed suitable for academic study The most famous canon is the Western Canon containing literature by DWEMs (Dead White European Males) E
(Gr "rule, measure, standard") The Canon of the scriptures or the official list of books recognized by the church as genuine and inspired by God The Canon of Matins (a collection of hymns consisting of nine odes, the Heirmos, and sung at the Matins Service, the Orthros) The Liturgical Canon which refers to all liturgical material, including the Creed, used for the Liturgy and the consecration of the Eucharist (see also kanon and Typikon)
An ecclesiastical title
A polyphonic composition in which all of the voices perform the same melody, beginning at different times
a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired
a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts
From the Greek word for measuring rod, this refers among other meanings to the rule by which something was judged, and particularly to the official list of books judged to be authoritative scriptures by a given community The Protestant canon of the Old Testament largely follows the Jewish canon It is therefore smaller than the Catholic canon, which includes several of the extra books found in the early Greek translation of scripture, the Septuagint (see Comparison of Jewish and Christian Canons) The Eastern Orthodox churches, which still use the actual Greek version of the Old Testament, recognize all of the Septuagint's extra books in their canon
a ravine formed by a river in an area with little rainfall
It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round
a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
the collection of scriptures recognized by Mahayana Buddhism
A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority
The collection of books that are considered inspired from God and authoritative in all areas addressed
a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church
The largest size of type having a specific name; so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church
a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
kanon
imitation
cañon
{i} canyon, channel, gully, deep narrow valley
canon law
A regulation in church law

The canon law on this matter conflicts with several other canon laws.

canon law
The law of the church, religious law

Canon law determines who is declared a saint.

canon laws
Religious rules, regulations and edicts
canon laws
plural form of canon law
Canon Finetech Inc.
{i} Japanese company headquartered in Mitsukaido (Japan), manufacturer of a wide variety of products (digital copiers and printers, electronic equipment, ink products, paper-handling devices, photosensitive paper containing diazonium and many more)
Canon Inc.
{i} Japanese corporation founded in 1937 and headquartered in Tokyo, world-renowned manufacturer of a wide variety of optical and imaging products (such as cameras, lenses, digital video cameras, etc.) and business machines (such as printers, copy machines, computer printers, laser facsimiles, etc.)
Canon law
Christian religious law, ecclesiastical law of the Christian religion
canon bit
That part of a bit which is put in a horse's mouth
canon bone
The shank bone, or great bone above the fetlock, in the fore and hind legs of the horse and allied animals, corresponding to the middle metacarpal or metatarsal bone of most mammals
canon law
Canon law is the law of the Christian church. It has authority only for that church and its members. The Church's canon law forbids remarriage of divorced persons. The body of officially established rules governing the faith and practice of the members of a Christian church. the laws of the Christian Church. Body of laws established within Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, independent churches of Eastern Christianity, and the Anglican Communion for church governance. Canon law concerns the constitution of the church, relations between it and other bodies, and matters of internal discipline. The ecclesiastical lawyer and teacher Gratian published the first definitive collection of Roman Catholic canon law 1140; the Decretum Gratiani drew on older local collections, councils, Roman law, and church fathers. The enlarged Corpus juris canonici ("Body of Canon Law") was published in 1500. A commission of cardinals issued the new Codex juris canonici ("Code of Canon Law") in 1917, and a revised version was commissioned after the Second Vatican Council and published in 1983. Following the Schism of 1054, the Eastern Orthodox church developed its own canon law under the patriarch of Constantinople. The Anglican, Coptic, and Ethiopian Orthodox churches also formulated their own collections
canon law
the body of codified laws governing the affairs of a Christian church
cannon
A large-bore machine gun
cannon
A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the player's ball
cannon
To play the carom billiard shot. To strike two balls with the cue ball

The white cannoned off the red onto the pink.

cannon
A complete assembly, consisting of an artillery tube and a breech mechanism, firing mechanism or base cap, which is a component of a gun, howitzer or mortar. It may include muzzle appendages.(JP 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms)
cannon
A bone of a horse's leg, between the fetlock joint and the knee or hock
cannon
To fire something, especially spherical, rapidly
cañons
plural form of cañon
crab canon
A contrapuntal composition in which one melody is superimposed on the same melody in reverse
cannon
{n} a great gun, the largest fort of types
cannon
heavy gun
cannon
{i} large gun
cannon
A large cannon that fires heavy projectiles
cannon
The arm of a player that can throw well
cannon
so as to glance off or rebound; to strike and rebound
cannon
To bombard with cannons
cannon
heavy automatic gun fired from an airplane
cannon
lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals a large artillery gun that is usually on wheels heavy automatic gun fired from an airplane (Middle Ages) a cylindrical piece of armor plate to protect the arm heavy gun fired from a tank fire a cannon make a cannon
cannon
Another term for the bicep armor which is worn between the shoulder bell and the forearm armor
cannon
The first artillery pieces, bombards, were little more than iron barrels with long metal bars bound together by hoops Mainly produced in Kampen and imported via London
cannon
A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently
cannon
A large muzzle-loading artillery piece
cannon
a defensive weapon used to discourage pirates The Sea Lion has four functional cannons Since the word "caliber" was not used in the Elizabethan time-period, the weight of the cannonball was used instead The Sealion's cannons are "one-pounders" The actual cannons weigh 400 pounds apiece
cannon
(Middle Ages) a cylindrical piece of armor plate to protect the arm
cannon
a shot in billiards in which the cue ball contacts one object ball and then the other
cannon
A cannon is a large gun, usually on wheels, which used to be used in battles
cannon
make a cannon
cannon
A bone of a horses leg, between the fetlock joint and the knee or hock
cannon
A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the players ball
cannon
fire a cannon
cannon
A musical form similar to a round
cannon
A kind of type
cannon
To collide or strike violently, esp
cannon
lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals
cannon
a large artillery gun that is usually on wheels
cannon
A generic term including guns, howitzers, mortars, and columbiads
cannon
Plate armor encircling the upper and lower arm
cannon
A complete assembly, consisting of an artillery tube and a breech mechanism, firing mechanism or base cap, which is a component of a gun, howitzer or mortar. It may include muzzle appendages
cannon
heavy gun fired from a tank
cannon
To discharge cannon
cannon
A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force
cannon
A cannon is a heavy automatic gun, especially one that is fired from an aircraft
cannon
Individual plate armour defence, of tubular form, for the upper and lower arm See also vambrace and rerebrace
cannon
If someone is a loose cannon, they do whatever they want and nobody can predict what they are going to do. Max is a loose cannon politically. see also water cannon. American politician who as Republican speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (1903-1911) was known for his strongly partisan and autocratic use of authority. to hit someone or something while moving fast cannon into. Long-range artillery piece, as distinguished from other big guns such as the howitzer or mor(Tarih) Early cannons, appearing in Europe in the 15th century, were smooth-bored and forged of iron, weighed 6,000-8,000 lbs (2,800-3,600 kg) and were loaded through the muzzle. They were mounted on wheeled carriages, which were thrown backward when the cannon was fired. Rifled bores and breechloading were adopted in the later 19th century, and new mechanisms such as the hydraulic buffer absorbed the recoil. Before 1850 ammunition was either cannister, grapeshot, or round, solid cannonballs and black powder, but rifled bores made possible the use of elongated projectiles, which had a longer range. The shrapnel shell was widely used in the 19th-20th century. Modern cannons, of high-grade steel, are towed on split-trail carriages or are mounted on tracked vehicles; a common calibre is 155 mm (6 in.). Many helicopters, airplanes, and naval vessels are equipped with multibarreled, Gatling-type rotary cannons firing 20-mm exploding shells
cannon
The name given to the collective components of the barrel, breech and breech ring of a howitzer
cannon
n meriam
cannon
"Rule" In counterpoint, a melody that is repeated exactly by a different voice, entering a short interval after the original voice
canons
(or Canon Law) The law of the church, containing the various rules, ecclesiastical decrees and definitions concerning the faith or the life style of Orthodox Christians The Canons generally provide for all administrative or disciplinary questions that might arise in the Church, and, consequently, are not infallible but can be changed or re-interpreted by an Ecumenical Council See also the article on the Canon Law of the Orthodox Church
canons
The written rules governing church policy, structure and procedure There are national canons and each diocese has its own
canons
[church] Rules of the church
canons
plural of canon
enigma canon
a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)
Türkçe - İngilizce

canon teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

canon av aygıtı
(Bilgisayar) canon av device
canon dv aygıtı
(Bilgisayar) canon dv device
canon