cannon

listen to the pronunciation of cannon
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} top

Sen Tom'un büyük kasları mı var sanıyorsun? Ben bu kollar altında gerçek toplar paketliyorum! - You think Tom's got big muscles? I'm packing literal cannons beneath these sleeves!

Bu kilise top ateşiyle yıkılmıştı. - This church was destroyed by cannon fire.

{i} bombardıman silahı
{i} mil
karambol bilardo
(Askeri) büyük top
çarpmak
hızla vurmak
(Askeri) TOP: Bir top, obüs veya havan ana parçasını teşkil eden bir top namlusu ile bir kama tertibatı, ateşleme tertibatı veya dip kapağından ibaret, komple parça. Namlu ağzına takılan ek parçalar buna da dahildir
karambol yapmak
çarpışmak
cannon bon
top,v.topa tut: n.top
{i} karambol (bilardo)
i., ask. top
bir şaft üzerinde serbestçe hareket eden bilardo oyununda karambol
gülle gibi fırlatmak
topa tutmak
cannon ball gülle
{i} incik kemiği
bombardıman etmek
koşum takımında bir çeşit gem
(Spor) bilardo karambol
cannon fodder
ölmeye giden askerler

Askerler ölmeye giden askerler olarak kabul edildi. - The soldiers were regarded as cannon fodder.

cannon ball
gülle
cannon cradle
top beşiği
cannon-bone
incik kemiği
cannon fire
topçu ateşiyle
cannon shot
top ateşi
cannon ball
top mermisi
cannon ball
çok sert şut
cannon bone
incik kemiği
cannon fodder
harpte harcanan erler
cannon platoon
(Askeri) piyade top takımı
cannon primer
(Askeri) TOP FÜNYESİ: Sevk barutunun ateşleyecek kapsülü ve tutuşturma tertibatını ihtiva eden komple parça
cannon shield
(Askeri) top kalkanı
cannon shot
{i} top menzili
cannon solute
(Askeri) TOP ATEŞİ İLE SELAMLAMA: Bir şahsa, gemiye veya sancağa saygı, göstermek veya özel bir olayı kutlamak üzere tespit edilen sayıda top ateşi
cannon sound
(Tıp) kanon sesi
canon
{i} kilise yetkililerinin çıkardığı bir kanun
canon
esas
canon
derin vadi
canon
katedral rahibi
canon
kanyon
canon
kanon müzik
canon
(Kanun) kaide
loose cannon
delifişek
loose cannon
delişmen
loose cannon
Ne yapacağı, ne diyeceği belli olmayan kişi, serseri mayın
snow cannon
Kayak merkezleri veya bunlar gibi yerlerde ihtiyaç duyulduğunda sûni kar üretip, etrafa püskürten kar makiesi
third person singular of cannon
üçüncü kişi topu tekil
water cannon
su topu
Canon
{i} kanon [müz.]
Canon
{i} kanun
Canon
{i} kriter
Canon
{i} genel kural
Canon
{i} kilise kanunu
Canon
{i} kırk sekiz puntoluk harf
Canon
{i} ölçüt
Canon
{i} ilke
Canon
{i} azizler listesi
Canon
{i} kutsal kitaplar
Canon
{i} kilise heyeti üyesi
canon
{i} kural
canon
{i} bir katedrale bağlı olan papaz
canon
kilise yasası/rahip/ilke
canon
kanon
fixed cannon
(Askeri) ÇAKILI TOP: Bak. "Fixed artillery"
fixed cannon
(Askeri) çakılı top
İngilizce - İngilizce
To bombard with cannons
A large-bore machine gun
A large muzzle-loading artillery piece
A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the player's ball
The arm of a player that can throw well

He's got a cannon out in right.

To fire something, especially spherical, rapidly
A complete assembly, consisting of an artillery tube and a breech mechanism, firing mechanism or base cap, which is a component of a gun, howitzer or mortar. It may include muzzle appendages.(JP 1-02 Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms)
To play the carom billiard shot. To strike two balls with the cue ball

The white cannoned off the red onto the pink.

A bone of a horse's leg, between the fetlock joint and the knee or hock
{n} a great gun, the largest fort of types
n meriam
The name given to the collective components of the barrel, breech and breech ring of a howitzer
If someone is a loose cannon, they do whatever they want and nobody can predict what they are going to do. Max is a loose cannon politically. see also water cannon. American politician who as Republican speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives (1903-1911) was known for his strongly partisan and autocratic use of authority. to hit someone or something while moving fast cannon into. Long-range artillery piece, as distinguished from other big guns such as the howitzer or mor(Tarih) Early cannons, appearing in Europe in the 15th century, were smooth-bored and forged of iron, weighed 6,000-8,000 lbs (2,800-3,600 kg) and were loaded through the muzzle. They were mounted on wheeled carriages, which were thrown backward when the cannon was fired. Rifled bores and breechloading were adopted in the later 19th century, and new mechanisms such as the hydraulic buffer absorbed the recoil. Before 1850 ammunition was either cannister, grapeshot, or round, solid cannonballs and black powder, but rifled bores made possible the use of elongated projectiles, which had a longer range. The shrapnel shell was widely used in the 19th-20th century. Modern cannons, of high-grade steel, are towed on split-trail carriages or are mounted on tracked vehicles; a common calibre is 155 mm (6 in.). Many helicopters, airplanes, and naval vessels are equipped with multibarreled, Gatling-type rotary cannons firing 20-mm exploding shells
Individual plate armour defence, of tubular form, for the upper and lower arm See also vambrace and rerebrace
A cannon is a heavy automatic gun, especially one that is fired from an aircraft
A great gun; a piece of ordnance or artillery; a firearm for discharging heavy shot with great force
{i} large gun
A kind of type
A complete assembly, consisting of an artillery tube and a breech mechanism, firing mechanism or base cap, which is a component of a gun, howitzer or mortar. It may include muzzle appendages
To discharge cannon
A generic term including guns, howitzers, mortars, and columbiads
a large artillery gun that is usually on wheels
lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals
Plate armor encircling the upper and lower arm
heavy gun fired from a tank
fire a cannon
A bone of a horses leg, between the fetlock joint and the knee or hock
A large cannon that fires heavy projectiles
To collide or strike violently, esp
A shot in which the ball struck with the cue comes in contact with two or more balls on the table; a hitting of two or more balls with the players ball
so as to glance off or rebound; to strike and rebound
heavy automatic gun fired from an airplane
lower part of the leg extending from the hock to the fetlock in hoofed mammals a large artillery gun that is usually on wheels heavy automatic gun fired from an airplane (Middle Ages) a cylindrical piece of armor plate to protect the arm heavy gun fired from a tank fire a cannon make a cannon
A musical form similar to a round
"Rule" In counterpoint, a melody that is repeated exactly by a different voice, entering a short interval after the original voice
make a cannon
A cannon is a large gun, usually on wheels, which used to be used in battles
a shot in billiards in which the cue ball contacts one object ball and then the other
(Middle Ages) a cylindrical piece of armor plate to protect the arm
a defensive weapon used to discourage pirates The Sea Lion has four functional cannons Since the word "caliber" was not used in the Elizabethan time-period, the weight of the cannonball was used instead The Sealion's cannons are "one-pounders" The actual cannons weigh 400 pounds apiece
A hollow cylindrical piece carried by a revolving shaft, on which it may, however, revolve independently
The first artillery pieces, bombards, were little more than iron barrels with long metal bars bound together by hoops Mainly produced in Kampen and imported via London
Another term for the bicep armor which is worn between the shoulder bell and the forearm armor
heavy gun
cannon ball
Alternate spelling of cannonball
cannon ball
An explosive-filled hollow iron sphere fuzed through a hole and designed to explode at a calculated distance rather than explode on impact
cannon ball
A solid usually iron spherical projectile fired from a smoothbore cannon; a solid shot; a round shot
cannon bone
A bone resulting from the fusion of metacarpals in some artiodactyls
cannon bone
The metacarpal of a horse
cannon fodder
artillery ammunition
cannon fodder
military forces considered to be expendable
cannon-bone
Attributive form of cannon bone, noun
cannon fire
shooting from cannon
cannon ball
large object used as ammunition in a cannon
cannon bone
See Canon Bone
cannon bone
A supporting bone of the leg in some hoofed mammals, analogous to the metacarpus of the hand or the metatarsus of the foot in humans
cannon bone
greatly developed metatarsal or metacarpal bone in the shank or cannon part of the leg in hoofed mammals
cannon caliber
width of a cannon barrel
cannon cracker
a large firecracker
cannon fodder
people who are considered insignificant, people who are sacrificed in war
cannon fodder
If someone in authority regards people they are in charge of as cannon fodder, they do not care if these people are harmed or lost in the course of their work. The conscripts were treated as cannon fodder. Soldiers, sailors, or other military personnel regarded as likely to be killed or wounded in combat. ordinary soldiers whose lives are not considered to be very important, and who are sent to fight where they are likely to get killed
cannon fodder
soldiers who are regarded as expendable in the face of artillery fire
cannon shot
{i} cannon ball; range of a cannon
Vulcan cannon
Any electric gatling gun
canon
The works of a writer that have been accepted as authentic

the entire Shakespeare canon.

canon
Those sources, especially including literary works, which are generally considered authoritative regarding a given fictional universe
canon
A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field

Can we this quote? the durable canon of American short fiction — William Styron.

canon
A religious law or body of law decreed by the church

We must proceed according to canon law.

canon
A member of a cathedral chapter
canon
A eucharistic prayer, particularly, the Roman Canon
chicken cannon
A device used during aircraft testing to discharge bird carcasses into airframes and engines to determine resistance to such impacts

The most unusual thing sold is the chicken cannon, a 10-foot-long pneumatic gun used at a test site to fire dead chickens at aircraft wings.

loose cannon
an uncontrolled or unpredictable person who causes damage to his own faction, political party etc

Mitt Romney is considered a loose cannon in the Republican Party due to his support for government spending increases, global regulatory agencies, and universal health insurance mandates.

loose cannon
a cannon that breaks loose during battle or a storm and causes serious damage to the ship and its crew
snow cannon
A machine that spurts out snow over pistes where there is little or no snow cover
spool cannon
A child's homemade toy made by attaching an elastic band to a cotton reel to form a slingshot that could shoot a pencil or other slim object through the bore of the reel

He had besides the things before mentioned, twelve marbles, part of a jews-harp, a piece of blue bottle-glass to look through, a spool cannon, a key that wouldn't unlock anything, .

water cannon
A device that shoots a large amount water at high pressure through a hose-like tube
canon
any rule or law
canon
{n} a rule, law, dignitary of the Church
snow cannon
A snow cannon (also called snowgun, snow maker, snow fan, or for certain appearances, russian missiles) is a device used to produce snow artificially. The product may be called artificial snow or man-made snow. A snow cannon works by atomizing water and allowing it to freeze into snow. The device is often used by ski hills and ski resorts to supplement naturally occurring snow and extend the skiing season
Canon
{i} Japanese corporation founded in 1937 and headquartered in Tokyo, world-renowned manufacturer of a wide variety of optical and imaging products (such as cameras, lenses, digital video cameras, etc.) and business machines (such as printers, copy machines, computer printers, laser facsimiles, etc.)
Canon
imitation
Canon
kanon
Joseph Cannon
born May 7, 1836, Guilford county, N.C., U.S. died Nov. 12, 1926, Danville, Ill. U.S. politician. He began practicing law in Illinois in 1859. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1872, he served 46 years (1873-91, 1893-1913, 1915-23). A staunchly conservative Republican, he used his power as speaker (1903-11) in a partisan manner. In 1910 a coalition of Democrats and insurgent Republicans passed a resolution that made the speaker ineligible for membership on the rules committee, the main source of his power. Personally well liked, he was popularly known as "Uncle Joe
Joseph Gurney Cannon
born May 7, 1836, Guilford county, N.C., U.S. died Nov. 12, 1926, Danville, Ill. U.S. politician. He began practicing law in Illinois in 1859. Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1872, he served 46 years (1873-91, 1893-1913, 1915-23). A staunchly conservative Republican, he used his power as speaker (1903-11) in a partisan manner. In 1910 a coalition of Democrats and insurgent Republicans passed a resolution that made the speaker ineligible for membership on the rules committee, the main source of his power. Personally well liked, he was popularly known as "Uncle Joe
Walter B Cannon
born Oct. 19, 1871, Prairie du Chien, Wis., U.S. died Oct. 1, 1945, Franklin, N.H. U.S. neurologist and physiologist. He was the first to use X rays in physiological studies. He also investigated hemorrhagic and traumatic shock during World War I and worked on methods of blood storage. He researched the emergency functions of the sympathetic nervous system and homeostasis and sympathin, an epinephrine-like substance released by certain neurons. With Philip Bard he developed the Cannon-Bard theory, which proposed that emotional and physiological responses to external situations arise simultaneously and that both prepare the body to deal with the situation
Walter Bradford Cannon
born Oct. 19, 1871, Prairie du Chien, Wis., U.S. died Oct. 1, 1945, Franklin, N.H. U.S. neurologist and physiologist. He was the first to use X rays in physiological studies. He also investigated hemorrhagic and traumatic shock during World War I and worked on methods of blood storage. He researched the emergency functions of the sympathetic nervous system and homeostasis and sympathin, an epinephrine-like substance released by certain neurons. With Philip Bard he developed the Cannon-Bard theory, which proposed that emotional and physiological responses to external situations arise simultaneously and that both prepare the body to deal with the situation
cannoned
past of cannon
cannoned
Furnished with cannon
cannoning
present participle of cannon
cannons
third person singular of cannon
cannons
plural of cannon
canon
a ravine formed by a river in an area with little rainfall
canon
A polyphonic composition in which all of the voices perform the same melody, beginning at different times
canon
a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired
canon
a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
canon
a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts
canon
From the Greek word for measuring rod, this refers among other meanings to the rule by which something was judged, and particularly to the official list of books judged to be authoritative scriptures by a given community The Protestant canon of the Old Testament largely follows the Jewish canon It is therefore smaller than the Catholic canon, which includes several of the extra books found in the early Greek translation of scripture, the Septuagint (see Comparison of Jewish and Christian Canons) The Eastern Orthodox churches, which still use the actual Greek version of the Old Testament, recognize all of the Septuagint's extra books in their canon
canon
a type of counterpoint where one musical phrase is played at the same time as itself at another interval in time, the first voice is called the antecedent and the second the consequent
canon
It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round
canon
a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
canon
(Gr "rule, measure, standard") The Canon of the scriptures or the official list of books recognized by the church as genuine and inspired by God The Canon of Matins (a collection of hymns consisting of nine odes, the Heirmos, and sung at the Matins Service, the Orthros) The Liturgical Canon which refers to all liturgical material, including the Creed, used for the Liturgy and the consecration of the Eucharist (see also kanon and Typikon)
canon
A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church
canon
The word canon comes from the name of a reed that grows straight enough that it can be used as a measuring stick Therefore, a canon is a standard or norm The by-laws of the ancient Church were called canons When we speak of the canon of scripture, we mean the standard list of books that are recognized by the Church as Holy Scripture
canon
when applied to an individual author, canon means the sum total of works verifiably written by that author When used generally, it means the range of works that a consensus of scholars, teachers, and readers of a particular time and culture consider "great" or "major " This second sense of the word is a matter of much debate since the literary canon in Europe and America has long been dominated by the works of white heterosexual men During the last thirty years, the canon in the United States has expanded considerably to include more women and writers from various ethnic and racial backgrounds Close Window
canon
or "unchanging [rule of] prayer," similar to "anaphora " The core part of the Mass wherein is enacted the whole remembrance of Christ's ministry, suffering, death, resurrection, and ascension, including the consecration of the Body and Blood of Christ In W Rite, it does not begin until the "Thee, therefore," since the preface after "Lift up your hearts" continually changes It concludes with the singing of the Our Father
canon
the title of a priest who serves on the staff cathedral, except that the head staff priest of the cathedral is the dean; the canon is addressed as "The Rev Canon Jane H Wilson" Salutation in letter: "Dear Canon Wilson" or "Dear Ms Wilson"
canon
Strict imitative polyphony, with the identical melody appearing in each voice, but at staggered intervals; standard in vocal polyphony
canon
A member of a cathedral chapter; a person who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church
canon
In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order
canon
a member of clergy on the staff of a cathedral or collegiate church, or a title of honour within a diocese
canon
The part of a bell by which it is suspended; called also ear and shank
canon
The collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures
canon
A musical or dance composition in which two or more parts recur, repeat, or interrelate with each other
canon
{i} church law; accepted principle, criterion; list of Christian saints; books of the Bible recognized by the Christian church; clergyman, religious cleric; (Music) contrapuntal piece of music in which one musical line of a melody is imitated in an accurate manner in other parts
canon
someone's list of authors or works considered to be "classic," that is, central to the identity of a given literary tradition or culture
canon
The method of composition for several voices in which different voices sing the same melody, one after the other, in either the same or different degrees of the scale
canon
A generally accepted principle
canon
A body of writing that is recognised by authority Books of holy scripture accepted by religious leaders as genuine are cannonical, as are works of a literary author which are regarded by scholars as authentic The canon of a national literature is the body of writings particularly approved by critics and anthologists which are deemed suitable for academic study The most famous canon is the Western Canon containing literature by DWEMs (Dead White European Males) E
canon
a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
canon
A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject
canon
in ancient times, an historical record of events In modern astronomy, a canon is a listing of celestial events, such as eclipses, over a period of time
canon
The works considered factual or official, usually within a specific franchise, which defines events, characters, etc. that are considered to have existence within the fictional universe
canon
the collection of scriptures recognized by Mahayana Buddhism
canon
A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority
canon
The collection of books that are considered inspired from God and authoritative in all areas addressed
canon
a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church
canon
The largest size of type having a specific name; so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church
canon
An ecclesiastical title
canon
A polyphonic composition in which one part is imitated by one or more other parts that eventually overlap
canon
The strictest form of imitation, in which two or more parts have the same melody but start at different points
canon
The term comes from the Greek word kannon, that means "measuring rod or ruler " In the Church we speak of canon law, the canon of Scripture, and people called canons The canon of Scripture refers to the books of the Bible that are accepted as genuine and inspired by God When used in reference to people, a canon is the title of a priest who either serves on the staff of a cathedral, or who has exhibited exemplary service to a diocese
canon
a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
canon
One of a body of dignitaries attached to a cathedral or a collegiate church, or a member of certain religious orders [8]
canon
The authorized collection of material constituting the sacred writings of a religious community; the material is believed to have special, usually divine, authority; the Hebrew Bible is the canon of the Jewish community; the Old and New Testaments (respectively with and without the Apocrypha) are the canon of the Roman Catholic and Protestant Christian communities See Introduction
canon
A piece of music in which the same melody is played by different voices, but beginning at different times
canon
From the Greek meaning a "rule" or "standard " In architecture it is a standard of proportion In literature it is the authentic list of an author's works In music it is the melodic line sung by overlapping voices in strict imitation In religious terms it represents the authentic books in the Bible or the authoritative prayer of the Eucharist in the Mass or the authoritative law of the church promulgated by ecclesiastical authority
canon
It is the strictest form of imitation
canon
See Canonical books, under Canonical, a
canon
A canon is a member of the clergy who is on the staff of a cathedral. Musical form and compositional technique. Canons are characterized by having a melody that is imitated at a specified time interval by one or more parts, either at the same pitch or at some other pitch. Imitation may occur in the same note values, in augmentation (longer notes), or in diminution (shorter notes); in retrograde order (beginning at its end), mirror inversion (each ascending melodic interval becoming a descending interval, and vice versa), or retrograde mirror inversion; and so on. Canons range from folk rounds such as "Three Blind Mice" and "Frère Jacques" to the massively complex canons of Johann Sebastian Bach
canon
In a literary sense, the authoritative works of a particular writer; also, an accepted list of works perceived to represent a cultural, ideological, historical, or biblical grouping Sidelight: Other literary groupings or collections include sonnet sequences, lyric sequences, cycles, companion poems, and anthologies
canon
A law or rule
cañon
{i} canyon, channel, gully, deep narrow valley
load a cannon
place ammunition into a cannon
loose cannon
{i} (Slang) person who is uncontrolled in a dangerous manner
loose cannon
a person who is expected to perform a particular task but who is out of control and dangerous
loose cannon
One that is uncontrolled and therefore poses danger
water cannon
a hose (carried on a truck) that fires water under high pressure to disperse crowds (especially crowds of rioters)
water cannon
A water cannon is a machine which shoots out a large, powerful stream of water. It is used by police to break up crowds of people who are protesting or fighting. A truck-mounted apparatus that fires water at high pressure, used especially to disperse crowds or control rioters. a machine that sends out a powerful stream of water, used by police to control violent crowds
water cannon
{i} hose usually mounted on a truck that fires a jet of highpressure water and is used to disperse crowds
Türkçe - İngilizce

cannon teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

cannon-bard duygu teorisi
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) cannon-bard theory of emotion
cannon

    Heceleme

    Can·non

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    känın

    Telaffuz

    /ˈkanən/ /ˈkænən/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'ka-n&n ] (noun.) 15th century. Origin circa 1400 A.D. from Old French canon, from Italian cannone, from Latin canna. This spelling was not fixed until circa 1800.Barnhart, Robert K.; Editor. The Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology. 1995 HarperResource/HarperCollins P.102.Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002. http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com (December 26, 2006).

    Videolar

    ... So Walter Cannon at Harvard called ...
    ... where Muslim warriors use it to fire cannon balls at Christian crusaders. ...

    Günün kelimesi

    implacable