brooks

listen to the pronunciation of brooks
İngilizce - Türkçe

brooks teriminin İngilizce Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

brook
{i} dere

Biz de derede altın bulamadık. - We also failed to find gold in the brook.

Benim köyümde, bir dere üzerinde küçük, dar bir yaya köprüsü vardır. - In my village, there is a small, narrow footbridge over a brook.

brook
{i} ırmak
brook
su
brook
(Coğrafya) akarca
brook
(Denizbilim) nehir
brook
kabul etmek
brook
tahammül etmek
brook
dayanmak
brook
kaldırmak
brook
çekmek
brook
katlanmak
brook
akak
brook
{i} çay
brook
brooklimebakabunga
brook
ırmak küçük nehir
brook
Veronica beccabunga brookweedsu sıçan kuyruğuSamolus
brook
izin vermek
brook
dayan/kabul et
it brooks no delay
gecikmeye gelmez
İngilizce - İngilizce
A topographic surname, variant of Brook
American literary historian, critic, and translator who wrote many books on the literary history of America, including The Flowering of New England (1936), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize. Brooks Islands Adams Henry Brooks Brooks Range Brooks Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks James L. Brooks Louise Brooks Mel Brooks Romaine Goddard Brooks Rodney Allen Brooks Van Wyck Kitaj Ronald Brooks Parker Alton Brooks White Elwyn Brooks
A surname
United States literary critic and historian (1886-1963)
third-person singular of brook
plural of , brook
Brooks Range
{i} mountain range that extends from the northernmost area of the Rocky Mountains stretching east to west across North Alaska
Brooks Range
A mountain chain of northern Alaska within the Arctic Circle. The northernmost section of the Rocky Mountains, it rises to about 2,763 m (9,060 ft) in the eastern part of the range. Mountain range, northern Alaska, U.S. It extends about 600 mi (1,000 km) from Kotzebue Sound to the Canadian border. Its highest peak is Mount Isto, at 9,060 ft (2,760 m). Forming the northwestern end of the Rocky Mountains, it lies within Gates of the Arctic National Park. Huge reserves of oil were discovered at Prudhoe Bay, and the range is crossed at Atigon Pass by the Trans-Alaska Pipeline
Brook
A male given name transferred from the surname
Brook
A surname for someone living by a brook
Brook
A female given name of modern usage; more often spelled Brooke
brook
To enjoy
brook
a water meadow
brook
a body of running water smaller than a river; a small stream
brook
{v} to endure, bear, be contented to suffer
brook
{n} a little river, rivulet, trifling current
Alton Brooks Parker
born May 14, 1852, Cortland, N.Y., U.S. died May 10, 1926, New York, N.Y. U.S. jurist. He practiced law in Kingston, N.Y., and was elected surrogate of Ulster county in 1877 and 1883. He was appointed to the New York Supreme Court in 1885, the state Appeals Court in 1889, and the appellate division of the state Supreme Court in 1896. From 1898 to 1904 he was chief justice of the New York court of appeals. On the bench, he was noted for upholding the rights of labour. As the Democratic Party presidential candidate in 1904, he represented the eastern, pro-gold-standard wing of the party. Soundly defeated by Pres. Theodore Roosevelt, he resumed his law practice
Elwyn Brooks White
born July 11, 1899, Mount Vernon, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 1, 1985, North Brooklin, Maine U.S. essayist and literary stylist. White attended Cornell University and in 1927 joined The New Yorker; he would contribute to it and later to Harper's magazine over several decades. He collaborated with James Thurber on Is Sex Necessary? (1929). His novels Stuart Little (1945), Charlotte's Web (1952), and The Trumpet of the Swan (1970) are classics of children's literature. White's revision of The Elements of Style (1959) by his professor William Strunk became a standard style manual for writers. He received a Pulitzer Prize special citation in 1978
Gwendolyn Brooks
With Annie Allen (1949), a loosely connected series of poems about growing up in Chicago, she became the first black poet to win the Pulitzer Prize. The Bean Eaters (1960) contains some of her best verse. Among her other books are In the Mecca (1968), the autobiographical Report from Part One (1972), Primer for Blacks (1980), Young Poets' Primer (1981), and Children Coming Home (1991)
Gwendolyn Brooks
born June 7, 1917, Topeka, Kan., U.S. died Dec. 3, 2000, Chicago, Ill. U.S. poet. Reared in the Chicago slums, Brooks published her first poem at age
Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks
born June 7, 1917, Topeka, Kan., U.S. died Dec. 3, 2000, Chicago, Ill. U.S. poet. Reared in the Chicago slums, Brooks published her first poem at age
Gwendolyn Elizabeth Brooks
With Annie Allen (1949), a loosely connected series of poems about growing up in Chicago, she became the first black poet to win the Pulitzer Prize. The Bean Eaters (1960) contains some of her best verse. Among her other books are In the Mecca (1968), the autobiographical Report from Part One (1972), Primer for Blacks (1980), Young Poets' Primer (1981), and Children Coming Home (1991)
Henry Brooks Adams
born Feb. 16, 1838, Boston, Mass., U.S. died March 27, 1918, Washington, D.C. U.S. historian and man of letters. A product of Boston's elite Brahmin class and a descendant of two presidents, he was infused with disgust for American politics of his time. As a young newspaper correspondent and editor, he called for social and political reforms, but he later became disillusioned with a world he characterized as devoid of principle. That loss of faith was reflected in his novel Democracy (1880). His study of U.S. democracy culminated in his nine-volume History of the United States of America (1889-91), which received immediate acclaim. In Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1913) he described the medieval worldview as reflected in its architecture. The Education of Henry Adams (1918), his best-known work and one of the outstanding autobiographies of Western literature, traced his confrontations with the uncertainties of the 20th century
James L. Brooks
born May 9, 1940, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. screenwriter, director, and producer. He worked in television from 1964. He cocreated and produced the hit Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970-77) and several other TV programs and series, including The Tracey Ullman Show (1986-90) and The Simpsons (from 1989). As writer, producer, and director of the film Terms of Endearment (1983), he won three Academy Awards; he also wrote, directed, and produced Broadcast News (1987) and As Good As It Gets (1997)
Louise Brooks
born Nov. 14, 1906, Cherryvale, Kan., U.S. died Aug. 8, 1985, Rochester, N.Y. U.S. film actress. She danced in Florenz Ziegfeld's Follies (1925) and soon gained a Hollywood contract. Noted for her magnetic screen presence and dark bobbed hair, she personified the 1920s flapper in the silent films A Girl in Every Port (1928) and Beggars of Life (1928). In Germany she gave legendary performances in G.W. Pabst's Pandora's Box (1928) and Diary of a Lost Girl (1929). Back in Hollywood (1930), however, she was offered only minor roles, and she retired in 1938 with little fame and no fortune. Her films were rediscovered in the 1950s, and her book Lulu in Hollywood (1982) won critical praise
Mel Brooks
orig. Melvin Kaminsky born June 28, 1926, Brooklyn, N.Y., U.S. U.S. director, producer, and actor. He wrote comedy routines for Sid Caesar's television shows (1949-59) and cocreated the TV series Get Smart (1965). He wrote and directed his first feature film, The Producers (1968, Academy Award for writing), which was later transformed into a hit Broadway musical. He directed, produced, and cowrote (and sometimes acted in) film comedies such as Blazing Saddles (1974), Young Frankenstein (1974), and Spaceballs (1987)
Mel Brooks
{i} (born 1926 as Mel Kaminsky) United States comic and screenwriter, writer of the films "Spaceballs" and "Robin Hood: Men in Tights
Rodney Allen Brooks
born Dec. 30, 1954, Adelaide, S.Aus., Austl. Australian computer scientist. By the time he finished his doctorate (1981) at Stanford University, Calif., Brooks was disillusioned by the traditional "model-based" approach to artificial intelligence (AI). After moving to the Mobile Robotics Laboratory at MIT in 1984, he built simple robots that could perform "insectlike" actions on the premise that practical learning comes from interacting with the real world. In 1997 Brooks became director of the MIT AI Research Laboratory
Romaine Goddard Brooks
orig. Beatrice Romaine Goddard born May 1, 1874, Rome, Italy died Dec. 7, 1970, Nice, Fr. U.S. painter. Born to wealthy American parents, she studied painting in Italy. After a brief marriage, in 1905 she moved to Paris where she established herself in literary, artistic, and homosexual circles. Her reputation reached its height in 1925 with several important exhibitions. Her gray-shaded portraits, touched by occasional colour, distilled their subjects' personalities to a disturbing degree. The Amazon ( 1920), Brooks's portrait of her longtime lover Natalie Clifford Barney (1876-1972), is among her finest works
Ronald Brooks Kitaj
born Oct. 29, 1932, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, U.S. U.S.-born British painter. He studied in New York City, Vienna, Oxford, and London. In the 1960s he was a prominent member of the Pop art movement in Britain. His works mingled the impersonal finish characteristic of Pop canvases with the loose, painterly brushwork of Abstract Expressionism but differed from the work of his Pop contemporaries in their complex and allusive figurative imagery. Kitaj's semiabstract paintings featured brightly coloured and imaginatively interpreted human figures portrayed in puzzling and ambiguous relation to one another. He exhibited internationally and taught at various British art schools
Van Wyck Brooks
born Feb. 16, 1886, Plainfield, N.J., U.S. died May 2, 1963, Bridgewater, Conn. U.S. critic, biographer, and literary historian. Brooks attended Harvard University. His Finders and Makers series, tracing American literary history in rich biographical detail from 1800 to 1915, includes The Flowering of New England, 1815-1865 (1936, Pulitzer Prize); New England: Indian Summer, 1865-1915 (1940); The World of Washington Irving (1944); The Times of Melville and Whitman (1947); and The Confident Years: 1885-1915 (1952)
brook
To use; to enjoy
brook
A natural stream of water smaller than a river or creek
brook
a natural stream of water smaller than a river (and often a tributary of a river); "the creek dried up every summer"
brook
To deserve; to earn
brook
a natural stream of water smaller than a river (and often a tributary of a river); "the creek dried up every summer
brook
{i} small stream, rivulet
brook
{f} bear, suffer, tolerate
brook
put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
brook
A brook is a small stream
brook
If someone in a position of authority will brook no interference or opposition, they will not accept any interference or opposition from others. From childhood on, she'd had a plan of action, one that would brook no interference = tolerate, allow. a small stream. not brook sth/brook no sth to not allow or accept something. Brook Farm Institute of Agriculture and Education brook trout Brook Sir Peter Stephen Paul
brook
To bear; to endure; to put up with; to tolerate; as, young men can not brook restraint
brook
To tolerate (usually used in the negative)
brooks

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    Brooks

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    brûks

    Telaffuz

    /ˈbro͝oks/ /ˈbrʊks/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'bruk ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English, from Old English brOc; akin to Old High German bruoh marshy ground.

    Günün kelimesi

    psithurism