temple

listen to the pronunciation of temple
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} tapınak

O tür tapınak bütün Orta Doğuyu, özellikle Mısır'ı etkiledi. - That type of temple influenced all of the Middle East, mainly Egypt.

Tom uzaktaki tapınak çanını duydu. - Tom heard the temple bell in the distance.

{i} şakak

Tom Mary'nin şakaklarına masaj yaptı. - Tom massaged Mary's temples.

Tom parmaklarıyla şakaklarıma masaj yaptı. - Tom massaged my temples with his fingers.

{i} sinagog
{i} ibadethane
kumaşı tezgâhta gergin tutmaya mahsus ağaç parças
(Tıp) Şakak, tempora
şakak/tapınak
{i} mabet
{i} kumaşı tezgâhta gergin tutan ağaç
çımbar
(Teknik,Tekstil) enine açıcı
cımbar
tapınağı
mabed
temple mount
haremi şerif
temple mount
haremü'ş-şerif
temple mount
Tapınak Dağı
temple mount
(Coğrafya) Kudüs'te üzerine kutsal Yahudi tapınağının inşaa edildiği tepenin adı
temple of artemis
Artemis Tapınağı
temple of love
aşk tapınak
temples
tapınaklar

Bizim aramızda doğayla ilgili olanlar hariç tapınaklar ve türbeler yoktu, . - There were no temples or shrines among us save those of nature.

Kyoto eski tapınakları ile ünlüdür. - Kyoto is famous for its old temples.

golden temple
altın tapınak
horyu temple
horyu tapınak
inner temple
iç tapınak
muslim temple
Müslüman tapınak
todai temple
todai tapınak
wooden temple
(Tekstil) ağaç cımbar
İngilizce - İngilizce
The slightly flatter region, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear
Something of importance; something attended to

My body is my temple.

Sometimes used to describe a protestant church in French-speaking nations
The Jewish temple of Jerusalem, first built by Solomon
A building for worship

A temple of Zeus..

Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning down around them
a body

Grows wide withal.

Something regarded as holding religious presence
The central place of Jewish worship David wanted a "house for God's Tabernacle" and his son Solomon build the first temple Rebuild Temple - After the 70 years in Exile the temple was rebuild but not in it original splendor
1)A building set aside for worship 2)Used figuratively as a believers body
The 2 "arms" that go over the wearers ears
   a place of worship The Temple in Hebrew religion was a permanent structure in Jerusalem, built by Solomon as a substitute for the tent of worship that the Israelites had used in the wilderness and continued to use through David's reign This temple was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587- 86 B C A second Temple was constructed under Ezra and Nehemiah in the fifth century, after the return from the Exile See Second Temple
Side pieces of an eyeglass frame that hook over or behind the ear to hold the glasses firmly in place See Free Eye Tests
Place of worship
{n} a church, building, side of the head
A temple is a building used for the worship of a god or gods, especially in the Buddhist and Hindu religions, and in ancient Greek and Roman times. a small Hindu temple. the Temple of Diana at Ephesus
place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed
A building dedicated to the administration of ordinances
A "house" in the form of a building or complex of buildings dedicated to a particular god or goddess Within the temple was a shrine with an image of the god which priests tendered to every day The cults of some gods became very powerful and their temple administrations sometimes amassed great wealth
place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity
A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; as, the temple of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India
{i} place of worship, shrine, church, synagogue; flattened region on either side of the forehead
Set at the fell of the cloth, it keeps the newly woven material at the correct width so that the warp and the filling in the weaving will interlace at right angles to form proper width fabric Also known as tempet, stretcher, and tenter hook
Your temples are the flat parts on each side of the front part of your head, near your forehead. Threads of silver ran through his beard and the hair at his temples. A city of central Texas south of Fort Worth. It is a processing and manufacturing center. Population: 46,109. See Shirley Temple Black. an area in central London which contains the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, two parts of the Inns of Court. Many lawyers and barristers work there. Edifice constructed for the worship of a deity. Features commonly include a sanctuary and an al(Tarih) Ancient Egypt had two kinds of temple: mortuary temples for the cults of dead kings, with a chapel in which offerings were presented, and cult temples that held images of deities. The cult temple typically included a massive pylon entrance with a court leading to a hypostyle hall and, at the heart of the temple, a shrine for the cult image. Most Classical Greek temples were rectangular and built of marble or other stone on a low stylobate (stepped platform). A gable roof was supported by columns, with a portico at each end (amphiprostyle temple), a colonnade extending all around (peripteral temple), or a double line of columns all around (dipteral temple). An inner cella housed the image of a deity, and an altar stood outside the temple. Roman temples were profoundly influenced by Greek style, but the altar was inside the temple and the colonnade was often reduced to a row of engaged columns. Hindu temples vary regionally, but generally consist of a towering shrine and a columned hall surrounded by an elaborate wall. Buddhist temples range from half-buried sanctuaries with richly carved entrances to single carved towers or statues. The Chinese and Japanese Buddhist temple is typically a one-story building of richly carved, painted, or tiled timber constructed around an atrium used for worship, though towering pagodas were sometimes built as temples over a shrine. In the Americas, Inca and Mayan temples were constructed of stone, often richly carved; they were generally stair-stepped pyramids, with the shrine at the top. See also synagogue. Golden Temple Horyu Temple Jerusalem Temple of Ryoan Temple Shore Temple Temple of Heaven Temple Shirley Shirley Temple Black Temple Sir William Todai Temple Palmerston of Palmerston Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount
To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; as, to temple a god
The ancient Greek structure built to shelter the god statue, and the focus of religious worship Thus, the Parthenon in Athens is the structure that was built to shelter the 40 foot tall ivory and gold statue of Athena Parthenos
Building dedicated for religious worship
One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place
The building used by people for religious worship
The "arm" of a pair of glasses, running from the ear to the lens area
A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely
Fig
The region of the skull on either side of the forehead
Any place in which the divine presence specially resides
The Israelite or Jewish temple to Yhwh, found in Jerusalem, and destroyed both in 587 BCE and (finally) in 70 CE
first used of the tabernacle, which is called "the temple of the Lord" (1 Sam 1: 9) In the New Testament the word is used figuratively of Christ's human body (John 2: 19, 21) Believers are called "the temple of God" (1 Cor 3: 16, 17) The Church is designated "an holy temple in the Lord" (Eph 2: 21) Heaven is also called a temple (Rev 7: 5) We read also of the heathen "temple of the great goddess Diana" (Acts 19: 27)
an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes
A place of worship; in the ancient world, temples were the centers of outward religious life, places at which public religious observances were normally conducted by the priestly professionals; in Israel there were many temples in various locations, but the temple in Jerusalem built by Solomon eventually became the central and only authorized place to worship Yahweh; first built by king Solomon around 950 B C E , it was destroyed by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar in 587 B C E , and rebuilt about 70 years later; it was destroyed by the Romans in 70 C E ; the site of the ancient Jewish Temple is now occupied, in part, by the golden domed Mosque of Omar; in recent times, "temple" has come to be used synonymously with synagogue in some Jewish usage See Chapter 9
(Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation
Hence, among Christians, an edifice erected as a place of public worship; a church
The holy place of worship in Jerusalem which replaced Moses Wilderness Tabernacle on land purchased for it by King David, and originally built by Solomon In Reform Judaism, this word can also mean synagogue
(stretcher) Adjustable wooden or metal bar with sharp points placed on the woven web to keep the width constant and the sett the same across the web To see a photo of a temple, go to temple
The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear
the flat area on either side of the forehead; "the veins in his temple throbbed"
~ The central place of worship in ancient Jerusalem The first temple was destroyed in 586 B C E The second was destroyed in 70 C E
The edifice erected at Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah
A local organization of Odd Fellows
pura
Temple Mount
One of the hills of Jerusalem, where the Biblical king Solomon built his great temple, which Roman emperor Vespasian's son and successor Titus leveled except for the wailing wall 70 AD during the failed Jewish rebellion
Temple in Jerusalem
A particular building complex once in Jerusalem, then a center of religious life
temple mount
Tapınak Tepesi
Temple Mount
mount in Jerusalem on which the Jewish Holy Temple was built
Temple Mount compound
group of buildings located on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem
Temple University
large public university located in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania, USA)
Temple of Heaven
Large religious complex in the old outer city of Beijing, considered the supreme achievement of traditional Chinese architecture. Its layout symbolizes the belief that heaven is round and earth square. The three buildings are built in a straight line. The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests (1420) has three concentric circles of massive wood columns symbolizing the four seasons, 12 months, and 12 daily hours; in a remarkable feat of engineering, they support the three roof levels and, in succession, a huge square brace (earth), circular architrave (heaven), and vast interior cupola. The Imperial Vault of Heaven (1530; rebuilt 1572) is a smaller circular building constructed without crossbeams; its dome is supported by complicated span work. The Circular Mound Altar (1530; rebuilt 1749) is a triple-tiered white stone terrace enclosed by two sets of walls that are square outside and round inside
Temple of Jerusalem
Either of two temples that were at the centre of worship and national identity in ancient Israel. When David captured Jerusalem, he moved the Ark of the Covenant there. As the site for a temple, he selected Mount Moriah, or the Temple Mount, where it was believed that Abraham had built his altar to sacrifice Isaac. The First Temple was constructed under David's son Solomon and was completed in 957 BC. It contained three rooms: a vestibule, the main room for religious services, and the Holy of Holies. From the time of Josiah, it was designated as the only place for sacrifice in Judah. It was destroyed during the Babylonian conquest in 586 BC. When the Jews returned from exile in 538, they built the Second Temple (finished 515). Its desecration by Antiochus IV in 167 BC set off the Maccabees' revolt, after which it was cleansed and rededicated. In 54 BC Marcus Licinius Crassus plundered the Temple. It was rebuilt and enlarged by Herod the Great; construction lasted 46 years. The Jewish rebellion in AD 66 led to its destruction by Roman legions in AD
Temple of Jerusalem
All that remains is part of the Western Wall, a site of pilgrimage. The Temple Mount is now occupied by a Muslim mosque, Al-Aq, and the Dome of the Rock
Temple-Tuttle
comet that orbits the sun every 33 years and causes meteor showers when close to earth
temple mount
Located in the southeast corner of the Old City of Jerusalem, the hill is identified with the Biblical Mount Moriah, where Abraham set the alter to sacrifice his son Isaac The First Temple was built on the Mount in the middle of the 10th century B C E and destroyed in 587 B C E The Second Temple was built on the same location in 561 B C E and destroyed in 70 C E by the Roman Legion
temple mount
This is Israel's most holy site It is the site on which the second temple was built It is the site on which the third temple will be built sometime during the Tribulation This is also the Muslim third most holy site as they believe their prophet Muhammad ascended up to heaven from this Mount On this Mount is a Muslim mosque (explained more under Dome of the Rock)
temple mount
The artificially expanded hill in Jerusalem on which the First and second temples stood, now occupied by the Muslim Dome of the Rock
temple of apollo
(Greek mythology) the oracle at Delphi where a priestess supposedly delivered messages from Apollo to those who sought advice; the messages were usually obscure or ambiguous
temple of artemis
a large temple at Ephesus that was said to be one of the seven wonders of the ancient world
temple of jerusalem
any of three successive temples in Jerusalem that served as the primary center for Jewish worship; the first temple contained the Ark of the Covenant and was built by Solomon in the 10th century BC and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar in 586 BC; the second was built in 515 BC and the third was an enlargement by Herod the Great in 20 BC that was destroyed by the Romans during a Jewish revolt in AD 70; all that remains is the Wailing Wall
temple orange
large sweet easily-peeled Florida fruit with deep orange rind large citrus tree having large sweet deep orange fruit that is easily peeled; widely cultivated in Florida
Shirley Temple
A non-alcoholic cocktail traditionally made with ginger ale, grenadine syrup, and orange juice garnished with a maraschino cherry and slice of lemon. The ginger ale is commonly substituted with lemon-lime soft drink, and the orange juice is commonly left out
Destruction of the First Temple
destruction of the first Jewish Temple built by King Solomon, exile of the Jewish people to the Diaspora
Destruction of the Second Temple
destruction of the second Jewish Temple by the Romans
First Temple
first house of worship that was located in Jerusalem, house of worship built by King Solomon
Golden Temple
a temple (=a type of church) in Amritsar in India which is very important in the Sikh religion. It stands in the middle of a holy lake and contains the holy book of the Sikhs. Punjabi Darbar Sahib or Harimandir Chief house of worship for the Sikhs of India (see Sikhism) and their most important pilgrimage site, located in the city of Amritsar in Punjab state. Founded by Guru Ramdas (1574-81) and completed by Guru Arjan Dev in 1604, the temple has entrances on four sides, signifying a welcome to all creeds and castes. Though destroyed in the 1760s by Afghan invaders, it was rebuilt, and in the early 19th century it acquired its marble walls and gold-plated copper domes. The surrounding buildings include a meeting hall, reference library, and museum, as well as the shrine known as the Akal Takhat. In 1984 the complex was seriously damaged during a confrontation between Sikh separatists and government troops; it was subsequently restored
Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston
known as Lord Palmerston born Oct. 20, 1784, Broadlands, Hampshire, Eng. died Oct. 18, 1865, Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire English politician and prime minister (1855-58, 1859-65). He entered Parliament in 1807 as a Tory and served as secretary at war (1809-28). Associated with the Whig Party from 1830, he served many years as foreign secretary (1830-34, 1835-41, 1846-51) and supported British interests and liberal causes abroad. He played a key role in establishing the independence of Belgium (1830-31) and Greece (1832) and secured Turkey's integrity against France (1840). Appointed prime minister in 1855, he brought an end to the Crimean War, approved the creation of the independent Kingdom of Italy, and supported a policy of neutrality in the American Civil War. Nicknamed "Pam," he was a symbol of British nationalism and one of Britain's most popular leaders
Henry John Temple 3rd Viscount Palmerston of Palmerston
known as Lord Palmerston born Oct. 20, 1784, Broadlands, Hampshire, Eng. died Oct. 18, 1865, Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire English politician and prime minister (1855-58, 1859-65). He entered Parliament in 1807 as a Tory and served as secretary at war (1809-28). Associated with the Whig Party from 1830, he served many years as foreign secretary (1830-34, 1835-41, 1846-51) and supported British interests and liberal causes abroad. He played a key role in establishing the independence of Belgium (1830-31) and Greece (1832) and secured Turkey's integrity against France (1840). Appointed prime minister in 1855, he brought an end to the Crimean War, approved the creation of the independent Kingdom of Italy, and supported a policy of neutrality in the American Civil War. Nicknamed "Pam," he was a symbol of British nationalism and one of Britain's most popular leaders
Horyu Temple
Japanese Hry-ji Buddhist complex near Nara, Japan, comprising the oldest known wood buildings in the world. The temple was founded by Prince Shtoku in 607 during the Asuka period, destroyed by fire in 670, and reconstructed 680-708. It retains the ch-mon (middle gate) of the roofed cloister enclosing the rectangular temple precinct, a five-storied pagoda, and a kond (main hall)
Inner Temple
a London organization of law students and barristers and the buildings they use, which is the oldest of the four Inns of Court
Middle Temple
a London organization of law students and barristers and the buildings they use, which is one of the four Inns of Court
Moslem Temple treasury
assets of the Islamic treasury
People's Temple
religious cult whose members committed suicide en masse in Guyana in 1978 (founded in 1955 by Jim Jones)
Ryoan Temple
Japanese Ryan-ji Japanese Buddhist temple in Kyto, famous for its abstract meditation garden ( 1500). An area approximately 30 by 70 ft (10 by 20 m) is covered with raked gravel and set with 15 stones divided into five unequal groups. The pattern of the design may be interpreted as rocky islets in a sea, but the garden's appeal lies essentially in the charm of its relationships and the arrangement of rocks such that all 15 are not visible from any single vantage point
Second Temple
temple in Jerusalem that was rebuilt by the Jewish people returning from Babylonian exile in 500 B.C. and then expanded under the rule of King Herod and was finally destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD
Shirley Temple
a popular drink for children in the US, made from lemonade and grenadine (=a sweet red liquid) , and served with a cherry. Shirley Temples are usually served in restaurants, and they are sometimes called Roy Rogers if they are served to boys. and Heidi (1937). As an adult she became Shirley Temple Black, and worked as an ambassador for the US government (1928- ) a US child actress who was very popular during the 1930s. She sang and danced and had blonde curly hair. Her films include Little Miss Marker (1934). later Shirley Temple Black born April 23, 1928, Santa Monica, Calif., U.S. U.S. child actress. She was selected from her dancing class for a screen test and made her debut at age four. She won notice in Stand Up and Cheer (1934) and was featured in Little Miss Marker (1934) and Bright Eyes (1934), in which she sang "On the Good Ship Lollipop." A precocious performer known for her dimples and golden curls, she became the country's most popular female star and Hollywood's top box office attraction in the Great Depression era. She received a special Academy Award in 1934. Her later films include The Little Colonel (1935), Wee Willie Winkie (1937), and The Little Princess (1939). As an adult she served as a U.S. delegate to the UN General Assembly (1969-70) and as U.S. ambassador to Ghana (1974-76) and Czechoslovakia (1989-92)
Shirley Temple
Shirley Temple Black (born 1928), American child movie star who later became a politician
Shore Temple
Complex of elegant shrines ( 700), one among a number of Hindu monuments at Mahabalipuram, on the coast of Tamil Nadu state, India. It is considered the finest early example of medieval southern Indian temple architecture. Unlike most of its neighbours at the site, it is built of cut stones rather than carved out of caves. It has two shrines, one dedicated to Shiva and the other to Vishnu. Its style is characterized by a pyramidal kutina-type tower that consists of stepped stories topped by a cupola and finial, a form quite different from the northern Indian sikhara
Sir William Temple
born April 25, 1628, London, Eng. died Jan. 27, 1699, Moor Park, Surrey British statesman. As ambassador to The Hague (1668-70, 1674-79), he formulated England's pro-Dutch foreign policy and arranged the marriage between William of Orange and Princess Mary of England (later William III and Mary II). After retiring from politics in 1681, he wrote numerous essays that were collected for publication by his secretary, Jonathan Swift. He also wrote the acclaimed Observations upon the United Provinces (1673)
Solomon's Temple
Jewish temple build by King Solomon
Todai Temple
Japanese Tdai-ji Monumental temple of the Kegon sect of Japanese Buddhism, located in Nara, Japan. The main buildings were constructed in 745-752 under the emperor Shmu, marking the adoption of Buddhism as a state religion. The Great Buddha Hall, built within a 2-sq-mi (5-sq-km) enclosure, measured about 288 by 169 ft (88 by 52 m) and, as restored today, is the largest wooden building in the world. The 53-ft (16-m) Great Sun Buddha was installed in 752. The Shsin is a repository for more than 9,000 works of art from the Nara period and more than 600 personal effects of Shmu
a temple
hieron
after the destruction of the 2nd Temple
in the period after the second temple of the Jews was destroyed by the Romans
after the destruction of the Temple
in the period after the temple of the Jews was destroyed in the 6th century B.C. by the Babylonians
destruction of the Third Temple
burning down of the third Jewish temple in Jerusalem (viewed as a threat, a warning against a great danger)
temples
plural of temple
the Temple
large Jewish building for the worship of God
the Third Temple
nickname for Israel, national Jewish homeland
time of the Second Temple
the return to Zion, days following the Jewish exile to Babylon during which the temple was rebuilt
Türkçe - İngilizce

temple teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

temple'da oturan avukat
templar (in England)
temple