ransom

listen to the pronunciation of ransom
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} fidye

Gaspçı iki milyon dolarlık bir fidye talep etti. - The hijacker demanded a ransom of two million dollars.

Fidye karşılığı Tom'u kaçıranlara teslim edilmeden önce çalındı. - The ransom money was stolen before it was delivered to Tom's kidnappers.

{i} fidye ile kurtulma
{f} fidye ödeyerek kurtar
fidye ödeyerek kurtarmak
{f} fidye verip kurtarmak
{f} fidye alarak serbest bırakmak
{f} fidye ile kurtarmak
{f} günahını bağışlatmak
fidye ile serbest bırakılma
{i} fidye ile kurtarma
{f} fidye karşılığı bırakmak
{i} kefaret
diyet
kurtarmalık
kurtulmalık
ransom money
fidye

Fidye karşılığı Tom'u kaçıranlara teslim edilmeden önce çalındı. - The ransom money was stolen before it was delivered to Tom's kidnappers.

ransom fidye
fidye ödeyerek kurtarmak
ransom and kidnap
(Sigorta) fidye ve kaçırma
ransom insurance
(Sigorta) fidye sigortası
king's ransom
büyük hazine
ransomed
fidye ödeyerek kurtarılan
a king's ransom
büyük para
ransomed
{f} fidye öde
rescue upon payment of a ransom
bir fidye ödenmesi ile kurtarma
demand a ransom
fidye istemek
hold someone at a ransom
(Askeri) Birini rehine tutmak
kidnap and ransom
(Sigorta) kaçırma ve fidye
kidnap and ransom insurance
(Sigorta) kaçırma ve fidye sigortası
ransomer
fidyeci
to ransom
fidye ile kurtarmak
İngilizce - İngilizce
To pay a price to set someone free from captivity or punishment
To deliver, especially in context of sin or relevant penalties
Money paid for the freeing of a hostage
To exact a ransom for, or a payment on
money demanded for the return of a captured person
A sum paid for the pardon of some great offense and the discharge of the offender; also, a fine paid in lieu of corporal punishment
Clan custom dictates that a warrior who has been succesful at his Trial of Bloodright may be rewarded by a gift from the Clan Depending upon the warrior's succes during the Trial, the ransom might range form the right to choose what type of weapon he will use as a warrior to the right to command a special unit
the price or payment made for our redemption, as when it is said that the Son of man "gave his life a ransom for many" (Matt 20: 28; comp Acts 20: 28; Rom 3: 23, 24; 1 Cor 6: 19, 20; Gal 3: 13; 4: 4, 5: Eph 1: 7; Col 1: 14; 1 Tim 2: 6; Titus 2: 14; 1 Pet 1: 18, 19 In all these passages the same idea is expressed) This word is derived from the Fr rancon; Lat redemptio The debt is represented not as cancelled but as fully paid The slave or captive is not liberated by a mere gratuitous favour, but a ransom price has been paid, in consideration of which he is set free The original owner receives back his alienated and lost possession because he has bought it back "with a price " This price or ransom (Gr lutron) is always said to be Christ, his blood, his death He secures our redemption by the payment of a ransom (See REDEMPTION )
To redeem from captivity, servitude, punishment, or forfeit, by paying a price; to buy out of servitude or penalty; to rescue; to deliver; as, to ransom prisoners from an enemy
payment for the release of someone
{i} redemption of a prisoner for a price; sum paid for the release of a prisoner
G3083 lutron, loo'-tron; from G3089; something to loosen with, i e a redemption price (fig atonement): --ransom
(apolutrosis) Redemption The act of buying back slaves or prisoners Used in LXX to translate Hebrew padah, set free or redeem by payment, and ga'al, to set free, acting as kin
A ransom is the money that has to be paid to someone so that they will set free a person they have kidnapped. Her kidnapper successfully extorted a £175,000 ransom for her release
disapproval If you say that someone is holding you to ransom in British English, or holding you for ransom in American English, you mean that they are using their power to try to force you to do something which you do not want to do. Unison and the other unions have the power to hold the Government to ransom. to pay an amount of money so that someone who is being held as a prisoner is set free
the act of freeing from captivity or punishment
If you ransom someone who has been kidnapped, you pay the money to set them free. The same system was used for ransoming or exchanging captives
The release of a captive, or of captured property, by payment of a consideration; redemption; as, prisoners hopeless of ransom
the act of freeing from captivity or punishment payment for the release of someone money demanded for the return of a captured person exchange or buy back for money; under threat
Clan custom dictates that a warrior who has been successful at his Trial of Bloodright may be rewarded with a gift by the Clan Depending upon the warrior's success during the Trial, the ransom might range from the right to choose what type of weapon he will use as a warrior to the right to command a special unit
{f} release, liberate, free; pay money for the release of a prisoner
If a kidnapper is holding someone to ransom or holding them ransom in British English, or is holding a person for ransom in American English, they keep that person prisoner until they are given what they want He is charged with kidnapping a businessman last year and holding him for ransom
The release of a captive by payment Specifically, the means by which man is set free from sin; or simply, "redemption "
exchange or buy back for money; under threat
The money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner, or for goods captured by an enemy; payment for freedom from restraint, penalty, or forfeit
raunsoun
ransom money
payment for the release of a kidnapped person or hostage
king's ransom
A large sum of money
Carl Ransom Rogers
born Jan. 8, 1902, Oak Park, Ill., U.S. died Feb. 4, 1987, La Jolla, Calif. U.S. psychologist. He trained at Teachers College, Columbia University (Ph.D., 1931), and directed a children's agency in New York before taking teaching positions at various universities. In 1963 he helped found an institute for the study of the person in La Jolla, Calif. He is known as the originator of client-centred, or nondirective, psychotherapy, and he helped establish humanistic psychology. His writings include Counseling and Psychotherapy (1942), Client-Centered Therapy (1951), Psychotherapy and Personality Change (1954), and On Becoming a Person (1961)
John Crowe Ransom
born April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tenn., U.S. died July 4, 1974, Gambier, Ohio U.S. poet and critic. Ransom attended and later taught at Vanderbilt University, where he became the leader of the Fugitives, a group of poets who shared a belief in the South and its agrarian traditions and published the influential journal The Fugitive (1922-25); he was among those Fugitives called Agrarian who contributed to I'll Take My Stand (1930). At Kenyon College, he founded and edited (1939-59) the Kenyon Review. His literary studies include The New Criticism (1941), which gave its name to an important critical movement (see New Criticism), and he became recognized as a leading theorist of the post-World War I Southern literary renaissance. His Selected Poems (1945; rev. ed., 1969) won the National Book Award
a king's ransom
large sum of money; large treasure
king's ransom
a very large treasure
ransomed
reclaimed by payment of a ransom
ransomed
reclaimed by payment of a ransom saved from the bondage of sin
ransomed
saved from the bondage of sin
ransomed
past of ransom
ransomer
One who ransoms or redeems
ransomer
{i} releaser, liberator; one who pays money for the release of a prisoner
ransomer
A person who pays a ransom
ransoming
present participle of ransom
ransoms
third-person singular of ransom
ransom