leverage

listen to the pronunciation of leverage
İngilizce - İngilizce
The ability to earn very high returns when operating at high capacity utilization of a facility

Their variable-cost-reducing investments have dramatically increased their leverage.

A force compounded by means of a lever rotating around a pivot; see torque

A crowbar uses leverage to pry nails out of wood.

By extension, any influence which is compounded or used to gain an advantage

Try using competitors’ prices for leverage in the negotiation.

To use; to exploit; to take full advantage (of something)

They plan to leverage off the publicity to get a good distribution agreement.

The use of borrowed funds with a contractually determined return to increase the ability of a business to invest and earn an expected higher return, but usually at high risk

Leverage is great until something goes wrong with your investments and you still have to pay your debts.

In the financial sense, making a given amount of money do more work than is normal for its "size," in exactly the same way a properly applied lever can lift a very heavy weight Getting "more bang for your buck " The more leverage used, the more speculative is the investment Buying stock on 50% margin is using more leverage than paying in full for the stock Buying stock options is more leveraged than buying stock on margin And then there's futures welcome to hyperspace
To use; to gain advantage; to take full advantage of an existing thing
to spread or use resources (=money, skills, buildings etc that an organization has available), ideas etc again in several different ways or in different parts of a company, system etc
to make money available to someone in order to invest or to buy something such as a company: the use of public funds to leverage private investment
(Ekonomi) The control of a larger sum of money with a smaller amount. By accepting the liability to purchase or deliver the total value of a futures contract, a smaller sum (margin) may be used as earnest money to guarantee performance. If prices move favorably, a large return on the margin can be earned from the leverage. Conversely, a loss can also be large, relative to the margin, due to the leverage
1. Provide (as a corporation) or supplement (as money) with leverage; enhance as if by supplying with financial leverage 2. Use for gain, exploit
the action, power, or use of a lever
influence that you can use to make people do what you want: diplomatic leverage by the US
the mechanical advantage gained by being in a position to use a lever provide with leverage; "We need to leverage this company"
~ The use of borrowed money to increase investing power
The use of borrowed money to increase both the amount of property you can purchase and the amount of profit this property generates For example, if you have $100,000 in cash you could purchase one house costing $100,000 But if you use leverage you could buy the same property using only $20,000 in cash and borrowing $80,000 You could then use the remaining $80,000 in cash to buy more properties or make other investments
Use of debt financing
{i} action of a lever; mechanical power supplied by a lever; influence, ability to affect or alter people or circumstances; use of borrowed money to increase the return on an investment
The ability to control large amounts of a financial asset with a comparatively small amount of capital
The effect of fixed charges such as debt interest or preferred dividends on per-share earnings of common stock Increases or decreases in income before fixed charges result in magnified percentage increases or decreases in earnings per common share Leverage also applies to seeking magnified percentage returns on an investment by using borrowed funds, margin accounts or buying securities which require payment of only a fraction of the underlying security's value, such as rights, warrants or options
Used in the context of general equities For corporations, property of rising or falling at a proportionally greater amount than comparable investments For example, an option is said to have high leverage relative to the underlying stock because a price change in the stock may result in a relatively large increase or decrease in the value of the option The use of debt financing
Leverage is the force that is applied to an object when something such as a lever is used. The spade and fork have longer shafts, providing better leverage
The action of a lever; mechanical advantage gained by the lever
In an investment context, the act of controlling more than one unit of a security through another device, such as buying stocks on margin, options, warrants, etc , for the purpose of enhancing returns or value In a corporate context, the relation of debt to equity in a firm's financial capital structure
Leverage is the ability to influence situations or people so that you can control what happens. His function as a Mayor affords him the leverage to get things done through attending committee meetings
The use of debt financing, or property of rising or falling at a proportionally greater amount than comparable investments For example, an option is said to have high leverage compared to the underlying stock because a given price change in the stock may result in a greater increase or decrease in the value of the option
{f} use one's influence to affect people or circumstances; increase the return on an investment by using borrowed money
investing with borrowed money as a way to amplify potential gains (at the risk of greater losses)
provide with leverage; "We need to leverage this company"
The relationship between interest bearing debt and equity in a company(financial leverage) or the effect of fixed expense on after tax earnings(operating leverage)
To leverage a company or investment means to use borrowed money in order to buy it or pay for it. He might feel that leveraging the company at a time when he sees tremendous growth opportunities would be a mistake. + leveraged lev·er·aged The committee voted to limit tax refunds for corporations involved in leveraged buyouts
The ability to control large dollar amounts of a commodity with a comparatively small amount of capital
Using someone else's money for the purchase of property
investing with borrowed money as a way to amplify potential gains (at the risk of greater losses) strategic advantage; power to act effectively; "relatively small groups can sometimes exert immense political leverage"
supplement with leverage; "leverage the money that is already available
The use of borrowed funds to earn a greater return than the cost of the borrowed funds
In investments, the attainment of greater percentage profit and risk potential A call holder has leverage with respect to a stock holder - the former will have greater percentage profits and losses than the latter, for the same movement in the underlying stock
the mechanical advantage gained by being in a position to use a lever
The degree to which an investor or business is utilizing borrowed money For companies, leverage is measured by the debt-to-equity ratio, which is calculated by dividing long-term debt by shareholders' equity The more long-term debt there is, the greater the financial leverage and the greater the risk of the company falling on its face For investors, leverage means buying on margin or using derivatives such as options, to enhance return on value without increasing investment Leveraged investing can be extremely risky because you can lose not only your money but the money you borrowed as well See "Long-Term Debt " BACK TO TOP
supplement with leverage; "leverage the money that is already available"
A measure of how much influence a single observation has on a fitted regression model Leverage is important since isolated points far from all the others may have a major impact on the fitted model The regression statlets list points whose leverage is very large, so that you may assess whether those points are improperly distorting the estimated model
The use of borrowed money to increase investing power
The effect on a company when the company has bonds, preferred stock, or both outstanding Example: If the earnings of a company with 1,000,000 common shares increases from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000, earnings per share would go up from $1 to $1 50, or an increase of 50% But if earnings of a company that had to pay $500,000 in bond interest increased that much, earnings per common share would jump from $ 50 to $1 a share, or 100%
The use of borrowed funds to increase profitability and buying power In accounting and finance, it is the amount of long term debt relative to equity The higher the ratio the greater the leverage
The practice of investing with borrowed money to increase potential profit For example, if you invest $5,000 and earn a 20 percent return, your profit is $1,000 If you invest $5,000 and borrow another $5,000 for a total of $10,000, you earn $2,000 (minus interest costs) A word of caution: Remember, leverage works both ways If your investment loses money, leverage can magnify your losses
Using long-term debt to secure funds for an organization In the social investment world, often refers to financial participation by other private, public or individual sources
Your company's ability to utilize debt financing to free your available cash flow or to acquire capital without a proportionate exchange in equity Your company invests with borrowed money in hopes of multiplying gains
A method of grantmaking practiced by some foundations Leverage occurs when a small amount of money is given with the express purpose of attracting funding from other sources or of providing the organization with the tools it needs to raise other kinds of funds Topic areas: Fundraising and Financial Sustainability
strategic advantage; power to act effectively; "relatively small groups can sometimes exert immense political leverage"
A method of grantmaking practiced by some foundations and individual donors Leverage occurs when a small amount of money is given with the express purpose of attracting funding from other sources or of providing the organization with the tools it needs to raise other kinds of funds; sometimes known as the "multiplier effect "
pry
application form
leverage ratio
(Finans) 1. Any ratio used to calculate the financial leverage of a company to get an idea of the company's methods of financing or to measure its ability to meet financial obligations. There are several different ratios, but the main factors looked at include debt, equity, assets and interest expenses.2. A ratio used to measure a company's mix of operating costs, giving an idea of how changes in output will affect operating income. Fixed and variable costs are the two types of operating costs; depending on the company and the industry, the mix will differ
leverage ratio
(Finans) The financial leverage ratio is a measure of how much assets a company holds relative to its equity. A high financial leverage ratio means that the company is using debt and other liabilities to finance its assets -- and, every thing else being equal, is more riskier than a company with lower leverage
leverage scale
Leverage scale is business exec doublespeak for growing a business by adding money or some other viable stimulus to the process of making more money. It is often used in refererence to separate business ventures that join forces to cut costs, borrow more aggressively or otherwise streamline or improve their practices to achieve a mutually sought-after goal
leverage ratios
(Accounting) index of foreign capital of a business compared to the total capital (used to estimate long-term financial stability)
financial leverage
(Finans) In finance, leverage (or gearing) is using given resources in such a way that the potential positive or negative outcome is magnified. It generally refers to using borrowed funds, or debt, so as to attempt to increase the returns to equity
financial leverage ratio
(Finans) The financial leverage ratio is a measure of how much assets a company holds relative to its equity. A high financial leverage ratio means that the company is using debt and other liabilities to finance its assets -- and, every thing else being equal, is more riskier than a company with lower leverage
operating leverage
The operating leverage is a measure of how revenue growth translates into growth in operating income. It can be a ratio of fixed costs to variable costs incurred to generate the revenue. Depending on the product, it can be generated by the ratio of preproduction costs (e.g. design widgets) versus incremental production costs (e.g. produce a widget)
financial leverage
relation between foreign capital and a business' capital (Accounting)
leveraged
past of leverage
leverages
third-person singular of leverage
leveraging
If a school offers a talented student extra financial aid, regardless of need, the student is more likely to enroll Leveraging is the controversial practice of figuring out how much it will take to attract such students and customizing aid offers to optimize the quality of the incoming class
leveraging
investing with borrowed money as a way to amplify potential gains (at the risk of greater losses)
leveraging
present participle of leverage
leveraging
{i} (Economics) buying securities with borrowed money (increases both the risk and the chances for higher profits)
leveraging
The use of one's own resources to raise others' commitment of resources
leveraging
To purchase a property by making the smallest down payment possible and financing the largest loan amount possible
leveraging
The exploitation by an organisation of its existing resources to their fullest extent
leveraging
Investing with borrowed money in the hope of multiplying gains If you buy $100,000 worth of stock and its price rises to $110,000, you've earned 10% on your investment But if you leveraged the deal by putting up only $50,000 of your o wn money and borrowing the rest, the same $10,000 increase would represent a 20% return on your money, not counting interest on the loan The flip side of leverage is that it also multiplies losses If the price of the stock goes down by $5,000 on the all -cash deal, your loss would be 5% of your $100,000 investment On the leveraged deal, your loss would be 10% of the money you put up and you'd still have to pay back the $50,000 you borrowed
lose leverage
lose energy, lose drive, lose the power to act
reverse leverage
condition in which the proceeds from a business are lower than the expenses
leverage