whale

listen to the pronunciation of whale
Englisch - Türkisch
{i} balina

Tom balina eti yemeği asla denemediğini söylüyor. - Tom says he has never tried eating whale meat.

Tom balinalarla ilgili çok sayıda dergi makalesi yazdı. - Tom has written many magazine articles on whales.

kamçılamak
Kumarhanelerde büyük oynayan, ortaya büyük miktarlar süren kumarbaz
f., k.dili
kuvvetli bir şekilde vurmak
{i} (çoğ. --s/whale) (Zooloji) balina
{f} balina avlamak
{f} dövmek
{f} pataklamak
(isim) balina
out kuvvetli bir şekilde vurarak çıkarmak: She was whaling the dust out of the
{f} sert davranmak
(Astronomi) balina (takımyıldızı)
whale oil
balina yağı
whaling
balina avlama
whale shark
zararsız köpekbalığı
whale bone
balina kemiği
whale fin
balina yüzgeci
whale tail
balina tail
whale the tar out of
eşek sudan gelinceye kadar dövmek
whale-road
(Edebiyat) Deniz, okyanus
whale calf
yavru balina
whale calf
balina yavrusu
whale fishery
balina avcılığı
whale fishery
balina avlanan yer
whale in and
gayretle bir işe başlamak
whale in and ..
gayretle (bir işe) başlamak: She whaled in and fixed supper for the whole push of 'em. Kalkıp onların hepsine akşam yemeği hazırladı
white whale
ak balina
grey whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) gri balina
killer whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) orka
sperm whale
amberbalığı
sperm whale
(Denizbilim) adabalığı
sperm whale
kadırgabalığı
whaling
çok
be a whale at
ustası olmak
bottle nosed whale
gagalı balina
bottlenose whale
gagalı balina
gray whale
gri balina
greenland whale
grönland balinası
humpback whale
kambur balina
right whale
balina
sperm whale
ispermeçet balinası

Bir ispermeçet balinası, en büyük dişli balinadır. - A sperm whale is the biggest toothed whale.

toothed whale
dişli balina
whaling
balina avcılığı
North Atlantic Right Whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) (Kuzey Atlantik) buzul balinası
a whale of a
k. dili 1. çok büyük: a whale of a difference çok büyük bir fark. 2. müthiş, dehşet, çok güzel: a whale of a novel müthiş bir roman
blue whale
Gök balina
pilot whale
pilot balina
right whale
Sağ balina
the whale
balina
a whale of
çok
a whale of
çok büyük
a whale of a fellow
çam yarması
a whale of a fellow
iri kıyım adam
a whale of a lot
pek çok
a whale of a lot
çok
be a whale at
otorite olmak
be a whale at
iyi anlamak
be a whale for
delisi olmak
be a whale for
çok sevmek
be a whale for
düşkünü olmak
be a whale on
çok sevmek
be a whale on
delisi olmak
gray whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) boz balina
have a whale of a time
{k} çok eğlenmek
have a whale of time
çok eğlenmek
have a whale of time
iyi vakit geçirmek
killer whale
katil balina

Katil balinalar güzel ama tehlikelidirler. - Killer whales are beautiful but dangerous.

pilot whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) kılavuz balina
pilot whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) karabalina
pygmy sperm whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) cüce kaşalot
throw a sprat to catch a whale
kaz gelecek yerden tavuk esirgememek
whaling
balina avında kullanılan
whaling
dayak
whaling
sopa atma
whaling
balina av
whaling
kocaman
whaling
koskocaman
whaling
{i} kötek
Englisch - Englisch
Something, or someone, that is very large

But when it comes to his business life and business career, Will Clayton is not as other men; he is such a whale of a lot better that it suggests a qualitative as well as a quantitative difference.

To hunt for whales
To flog, to beat
a person who routinely bets at the maximum limit allowable

The high roller who had the most ferocious reputation for trying to run the business of the casinos where he played, before he died on December 26, 2006, was Kerry Packer. In the casino world, Packer was the Prince of Whales.

Any of several species of large sea mammals
{n} the largest of all fish, monster, mark
A high roller, also referred to as a whale in the casino industry, is a gambler who wagers large amounts of money. Because of potential windfall these high sums can bring to the casinos, high rollers often receive increasingly lavish perks from casinos to lure them onto their gambling floors, such as free private jet transfers, limousine use and be allowed to stay in the casinos best suite
{f} hunt whales; thrash, hit repeatedly; attack with criticism
Any aquatic mammal of the order Cetacea, especially any one of the large species, some of which become nearly one hundred feet long
= an aquatic mammal, not a fish
Whales are very large mammals that live in the sea. see also killer whale, sperm whale
any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head
If you say that someone is having a whale of a time, you mean that they are enjoying themselves very much. I had a whale of a time in Birmingham. To attack vehemently: The poet whaled away at the critics. whale into/on sb/sth to start hitting someone or something. Any of dozens of species of exclusively aquatic mammals found in oceans, seas, rivers, and estuaries worldwide but especially numerous in the Antarctic Ocean. Whales are commonly distinguished from the smaller porpoises and dolphins and sometimes from narwhals, but they are all cetaceans. See also baleen whale; toothed whale. white whale baleen whale blue whale fin whale razorback whale finback whale humpback whale killer whale pilot whale right whale sei whale sperm whale toothed whale whale shark Whales Bay of International Whaling Commission
Whales are hunted chiefly for their oil and baleen, or whalebone
{i} very large sea mammal with an air spout on the top of the head
any of the larger cetacean mammals having a streamlined body and breathing through a blowhole on the head hunt for whales
la ballena; blue whale, la ballena azul
The Hebrew word tan (plural, tannin) is so rendered in Job 7: 12 (A V ; but R V , "sea-monster") It is rendered by "dragons" in Deut 32: 33; Ps 91: 13; Jer 51: 34; Ps 74: 13 (marg , "whales;" and marg of R V , "sea-monsters"); Isa 27: 1; and "serpent" in Ex 7: 9 (R V marg , "any large reptile," and so in ver 10, 12) The words of Job (7: 12), uttered in bitter irony, where he asks, "Am I a sea or a whale?" simply mean, "Have I a wild, untamable nature, like the waves of the sea, which must be confined and held within bounds, that they cannot pass?" "The serpent of the sea, which was but the wild, stormy sea itself, wound itself around the land, and threatened to swallow it up Job inquires if he must be watched and plagued like this monster, lest he throw the world into disorder" (Davidson's Job)
a very large person; impressive in size or qualities
to hit or beat, as in: In times past, a teacher might threaten to whale an unruly student
hunt for whales
whale catfish
Any fish of the Cetopsidae family of catfishes
whale oil
Any of various oils and fats extracted from the blubber of whales and used in the manufacture of soap and lubricants (formerly as an illuminating oil)
whale oils
plural form of whale oil
whale on
To beat heavily on anything

The wrench wouldn’t budge, even though Tony was just whaling on it with a big old sledge hammer.

whale on
To strike an opponent heavily and repeatedly in a fight
whale shark
A very large spotted shark, Rhincodon typus, of warm marine waters, similar to a whale, that feeds by filtering plankton from the water
whale sharks
plural form of whale shark
whale tail
An unintentional display of a thong etc above the waistband of trousers etc
whale tail
The tail of a whale
whale tail
An automotive spoiler
whale tails
plural form of whale tail
whale watching
The practice of observing whales and other cetaceans in their natural habitat
whale's tail
The tail of a whale
whale's tail
the distal bifurcation of the left anterior descending coronary artery

the distal birfucation, which is also known as the moustache, pitch fork, or whale's tail, in the left anterior descending coronary artery. , Eric J. Topol. Edition 4, illustrated. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2003. ISBN 0721694497.

whale tail
Whale tail is a phrase describing the waistband of a thong or g-string when visible above the waistline of low-rise pants, shorts, or a skirt creating a shape resembling a whale's tail. The appearance of a whale tail is not always intentional
whale-road
(Edebiyat) (poetic) The sea(s), the ocean(s)
whale fin
{i} whalebone, horny and elastic material taken from the upper jaw of some whales (formerly used in making the ribs of corsets)
whale fishery
fishing whales; whaling
whale fishing
hunting for whales
whale louse
amphipod crustacean parasitic on cetaceans
whale of a time
great time, enjoyable time
whale oil
oil obtained from the bodies of hunted whales
whale oil
a white to brown oil obtained from whale blubber; formerly used as an illuminant
whale oil
A yellowish oil obtained from whale blubber, formerly used in making soap and candles and as a lubricating oil and a fuel for lamps
whale shark
A very large shark (Rhincodon typus) of warm marine waters, having a spotted body, small teeth, and a network of rakelike sieves extending from its gills for straining plankton from the water. Species (Rhincodon typus) of gigantic but harmless shark found worldwide but mainly in the tropics. The largest of living fishes, it often grows to about 30 ft (9 m) long and may reach twice that size. It is gray or brown with a pale undersurface and is distinctively marked with small spots and narrow vertical lines of yellow or white. It has tiny teeth, and eats plankton and small fishes. A sluggish animal, it generally swims slowly near the surface and has been hit by ships
whale shark
large spotted shark of warm surface waters worldwide; resembles a whale and feeds chiefly on plankton
whale sucker
large blue Pacific remora that attaches to whales and dolphins
white whale
A small toothed whale (Delphinapterus leucas), chiefly of northern waters, that is white when full-grown. Also called beluga, sea canary
white whale
type of large sea mammal
white whale
small northern whale that is white when adult
baleen whale
Any of several large whales, of the suborder Mysticeti, that have plates of whalebone instead of teeth
beaked whale
Any of at least 20 species of whales in the family Ziphiidae, known to dive to great depths
blue whale
A whale (Balaenoptera musculus), blue in colour/color and the largest known living animal
bottlenose whale
One of two species of whale in the Hyperoodon genus, both with characteristic bottle-shaped noses
dwarf sperm whale
One of the two small whales in the sperm whale family, Kogia sima
false killer whale
A dolphin of species Pseudorca crassidens, the sole species of genus Pseudorca and one of the larger dolphin species
fin whale
a whale of the rorqual family (Balaenoptera physalus)
gray whale
A baleen whale, Eschrichtius robustus, from the north Pacific
have a whale of a time
To enjoy oneself greatly

We had a whale of a time at the party Saturday night.

humpback whale
A baleen whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)
killer whale
A sea mammal related to dolphins and porpoises
minke whale
either of two baleen whales, Balaenoptera acutorostrata and Balaenoptera bonaerensis found in coastal waters
northern bottlenose whale
A species of bottlenose whale, endemic to the North Atlantic, scientific name Hyperoodon ampullatus
pilot whale
Either of two species of whale in the genus Globicephala, dark grey in colour
pygmy sperm whale
One of the two small whales in the sperm whale family, Kogia breviceps
right whale
The baleen whales belonging to the family Balaenidae, in the genera Eubalaena (three species) and Balaena (one species, the bowhead whale, also called the Greenland right whale)
sei whale
a whale of the rorqual family (Balaenoptera borealis)
southern bottlenose whale
A species of bottlenose whale, found in the southern oceans, scientific name Hyperoodon planifrons
sperm whale
A whale (Physeter macrocephalus), the largest of the toothed whales
sulfur-bottom whale
the blue whale
sulphur bottom whale
the blue whale
sulphur-bottom whale
Alternative spelling of sulfur-bottom whale
toothed whale
a whale of the Odontoceti suborder of the cetaceans, including sperm whales, beaked whales, dolphins, and others
whaling
A beating
whaling
Present participle of whale
whaling
The practice of spotting whales
whaling
The practice of hunting whales
North Atlantic Right Whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) The North Atlantic Right Whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is a baleen whale, one of three species formerly called classified as the Right Whale belonging to the genus Eubalaena. About 300 North Atlantic Right Whales live in the North Atlantic Ocean
Right Whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) A baleen whale with a large head and a deeply curved jaw, of Arctic and temperate waters
baleen Whale
(Hayvan Bilim, Zooloji) A whale that has plates of whalebone in the mouth for straining plankton from the water. Baleen whales include the rorqual, humpback, right whale, and grey whale. Also called WHALEBONE WHALE
blue whale
A very large whalebone whale (Balaenoptera musculus) having a bluish-gray back, yellow underparts, and several ventral throat grooves. It is considered the largest living animal, sometimes reaching a length of 30.5 meters (100 feet). Also called sulphur-bottom
Whales
An inlet of the Ross Sea in the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica. It has been used as a base for Antarctic expeditions since 1911
World Whale Police
environmental group that seeks to educate the public about issues concerning whales, WWP
baleen whale
whale with plates of whalebone along the upper jaw for filtering plankton from the water
baleen whale
Any of several usually large whales of the suborder Mysticeti, such as the right whale and rorquals, having a symmetrical skull, two blowholes, and whalebone plates instead of teeth. Also called mysticete, whalebone whale. Any of about 13 species of cetaceans in the suborder Mysticeti. They are distinguished by a specialized feeding structure, the baleen, which strains plankton and small crustaceans from the water. It consists of two horny plates attached to the roof of the mouth. Each plate (as long as 12 ft, or 3.6 m, in the right whale) is composed of parallel slats with fringes that mat together to form a sieve. Other baleen whales are the blue, fin, gray, humpback, and sei whales and the rorqual. Baleen was once used for corset stays and is still used in some industrial brushes
beaked whale
any of several whales inhabiting all oceans and having beaklike jaws with vestigial teeth in the upper jaw
beaked whale
Any of various toothed whales of the family Ziphiidae, having a long beaklike snout and a small dorsal fin and inhabiting all of the oceans
blue whale
{i} large baleen whale found in all non-polar ocean waters (largest animal on Earth, currently listed as an endangered species)
blue whale
largest mammal ever known; bluish-gray migratory whalebone whale mostly of southern hemisphere
blue whale
n. A very large whalebone whale (Balaenoptera musculus) having a bluish-gray back, yellow underparts, and several ventral throat grooves. It is considered the largest living animal, sometimes reaching a length of 30.5 meters (100 feet). Also called sulphur-bottom. Mottled, blue-gray baleen whale (Balaenoptera musculus), also called sulfur-bottom whale because of the yellowish diatoms on some individuals. The largest of all animals, the blue whale reaches a maximum length of about 100 ft (30 m) and a maximum weight of 150 tons (136,000 kg). It is found alone or in small groups in all oceans. In summer it feeds on krill in polar waters, and in winter it moves toward the equator to breed. It was once the most important of the commercially hunted baleen whales, and its populations were greatly reduced. Listed as an endangered species, it is now protected
bottle-nosed whale
northern Atlantic beaked whale with a bulbous forehead
dwarf sperm whale
very small (to 8 feet) sperm whale of central coasts of Atlantic and Pacific
fin whale
or finback whale or razorback whale or common rorqual Swift, slender-bodied baleen whale (Balaenoptera physalus) named for the ridge on its back. It is 59-89 ft (18-27 m) long, with a triangular dorsal fin, short baleen, and several dozen grooves along its throat and chest. It is gray, with white on the underparts and on the right side of the lower jaw. It is found in oceans worldwide, in groups of a few to several hundred. It lives in polar waters in summer, feeding on crustaceans and small fishes, and moves to warmer waters in winter to breed. Once commercially valuable, it has been substantially reduced in numbers by overhunting and is now listed as an endangered species
gray whale
medium-sized grayish-black whale of the northern Pacific
gray whale
A whalebone whale (Eschrichtius robustus) of northern Pacific waters, having grayish-black coloring with white blotches. Also called devilfish
humpback whale
n. A baleen whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) having a rounded back and long knobby flippers. Humpback whales communicate using complex, distinctive songs that identify individuals and play an important role in mating. a large whale. Long-finned baleen whale (Megaptera novaeangliae). They live along all major ocean coasts, sometimes swimming close inshore or even into harbours and up rivers. Humpbacks grow to 40-52 ft (12-16 m) long. They are black above, with some white below, and have large knobs on the head and jaws. The humpback migrates between polar waters in summer and tropical or subtropical breeding grounds in winter. It feeds on shrimplike crustaceans, small fish, and plankton. It is probably the most vocal of all whales (with "songs" of 5-35 minutes) and one of the most acrobatic (capable of turning a somersault). Much reduced in number by overhunting, humpbacks have been protected worldwide since the 1960s, and some populations seem to be increasing
humpback whale
humpback: large whalebone whale with long flippers noted for arching or humping its back as it dives
killer whale
predatory black-and-white toothed whale with large dorsal fin; common in cold seas
killer whale
A killer whale is a type of black and white whale. A black and white predatory whale (Orcinus orca) that feeds on large fish, squid, and sometimes dolphins and seals. Also called orca. a black and white whale that eats meat. or orca A species (Orcinus orca) of toothed whale found in all seas from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Largest of the dolphins, the male may be 30 ft (9 m) long and weigh over 10,000 lbs (4,500 kg). The killer whale is black, with white on the underparts, above each eye, and on each flank. The snout is blunt, and the strong jaws have 40-50 large, sharp, conical teeth. Killer whales live in groups of a few to about 50 individuals. They feed on fishes, cephalopods, penguins, and marine mammals; though they are fierce predators of seals and even other whales, there is no recorded instance of a killer whale attacking a human. They are often kept in captivity and trained as performers in marine shows
killer whale
type of predatory toothed whale that attacks dolphins and other whales (extremely intelligent and easy to train in captivity)
piked whale
A small, dark gray whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) having a white underside and white bands on the flippers. Also called minke whale
pilot whale
small dark-colored whale of the Atlantic coast of the United States; the largest male acts as pilot or leader for the school
pilot whale
Any of several large, usually black dolphins of the genus Globicephala, having an outward-curving globular forehead and noted for their occasional mass strandings. Also called blackfish, pothead whale. a small whale with black skin. Any of one to three species (genus Globicephala, family Delphinidae) of toothed whale found in all oceans except the Arctic and Antarctic, also called caa'ing whale for a roaring sound it makes when stranded. It is black, usually with a lighter splash on the throat and chest, and has a round, bulging forehead, a short beaklike snout, and slender, pointed flippers, and grows to 13-20 ft (4-6 m) long. Pilot whales live in large schools, sometimes hundreds or thousands, feeding mainly on squid. They have been kept in oceanariums and trained to perform
pygmy sperm whale
small sperm whale of warm waters of both coasts of North America
right whale
Any other whale that produces valuable whalebone, as the Atlantic, or Biscay, right whale (Balæna cisarctica), and the Pacific right whale (B
right whale
Sieboldii; a bone whale
right whale
large arctic whalebone whale; allegedly the `right' whale to hunt because of its valuable whalebone and oil
right whale
The bowhead, Arctic, or Greenland whale (Balæna mysticetus), from whose mouth the best whalebone is obtained
right whale
Any of several whales of the family Balaenidae, characterized by a large head, whalebone plates in the mouth, and absence of a dorsal fin. Any of five species (genera Balaena, Eubalaena, and Caperea) of baleen whales (family Balaenidae) with a stout body and an enormous head. (The name refers to two species considered the "right" whales to hunt because of their value, slowness, and buoyancy after death.) The upper jaw is strongly arched, and the lower lip curves upward along the side, giving the lower jaw a scooplike form. There is no dorsal fin except in the pygmy right whale (Caperea marginata), a small, seldom-seen whale of the Southern Hemisphere. The bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), inhabiting Arctic and northern temperate waters, is black, with a white chin, throat, and sometimes underparts. It grows to about 65 ft (20 m). The northern right whale (E. glacialis) grows to 60 ft (18 m). Similar to the bowhead but with a smaller, less strongly arched head, it may also have a "bonnet," a horny growth infested with parasites, on its snout. Both species have been protected since 1946
sei whale
A rorqual (Balaenoptera borealis) that is blue-black above and white below, that grows up to about 55 feet (17 meters) in length, and that is found in all the oceans, with the greatest number living in Antarctic waters. or Rudolphi's rorqual Swift species (Balaenoptera borealis) of baleen whale in the rorqual family. It is 40-50 ft (13-15 m) long and is bluish gray or blackish above and paler below. It has small flippers, about 50 short lengthwise grooves on its chest, and dark baleen with pale, silky, inner fringes. It inhabits oceans from the Arctic to the Antarctic, migrating between cold and temperate summer waters and winter breeding grounds in warmer regions
sei whale
similar to but smaller than the finback whale
sperm whale
This whale sometimes grows to the length of more than eighty feet
sperm whale
large whale with a large cavity in the head containing spermaceti and oil; also a source of ambergris
sperm whale
A sperm whale is a large whale with a large head that has a section in it which contains oil. Any of several large, toothed whales of the family Physeteridae, especially Physeter catodon or P. macrocephalus, of tropical and temperate oceans, whose massive head has a cavity containing sperm oil and spermaceti and whose long intestines often contain ambergris. Also called cachalot. a large whale sometimes hunted for its oil and fat. or cachalot Thickset, blunt-snouted toothed whale (Physeter catodon, family Physeteridae) with small, paddlelike flippers and rounded humps on the back. Sperm whales have an enormous head, squarish in profile, and a narrow, underslung lower jaw with large conical teeth that fit into sockets in the toothless upper jaw when the mouth is closed. They are dark blue-gray or brownish. (Herman Melville's Moby-Dick was presumably an albino.) The male grows to 60 ft (18 m). Herds of 15-20 live in temperate and tropical waters worldwide. They commonly dive to 1,200 ft (350 m), feeding primarily on cephalopods. The whales have been hunted for their spermaceti (a waxy substance in the snout, used in ointments and cosmetics) and for ambergris. The pygmy sperm whale (genus Kogia) is a black dolphinlike whale, about 13 ft (4 m) long, of the Northern Hemisphere that lacks commercial value
sperm whale
A very large toothed whale (Physeter macrocephalus), having a head of enormous size
sperm whale
It is found in the warmer parts of all the oceans
sperm whale
The upper jaw is destitute of teeth
sperm whale
In the upper part of the head, above the skull, there is a large cavity, or case, filled with oil and spermaceti
sperm whale
Called also cachalot, and spermaceti whale
toothed whale
Any of various whales of the suborder Odontoceti, having numerous conical teeth. Common term for members of the cetacean suborder Odontoceti. Toothed whales have slicing teeth and a throat large enough to swallow chunks of giant squid, cuttlefish, and fish of all kinds. Included in this group are the beluga, killer whale, pilot whales, sperm whale, and mammalian dolphins, porpoises, and narwhals
toothed whale
any of several whales having simple conical teeth and feeding on fish etc
whaled
past of whale
whales
plural of whale
whales
third-person singular of whale
whaling
Whaling is the activity of hunting and killing whales. a ban on commercial whaling. the whaling industry. the activity of hunting whales. Hunting of whales for food, oil, or both. Whaling dates to prehistoric times, when Arctic peoples used stone tools to hunt whales. They used the entire animal, a feat not accomplished by Western commercial whalers until the advent of floating factories in the 20th century. The Basque were the first Europeans to hunt whales commercially; when seaworthy oceangoing vessels began to be made, they took to the open seas (14th-16th century). They were followed by the Dutch and the Germans in the 17th century and the British and their colonists in the 18th century. In 1712 the first sperm whale was killed; its oil proved more valuable than that of the right whale, which had hitherto been the object of whaling ventures. Whaling expeditions in pursuit of the free-ranging sperm whale could last for four years. The discovery of petroleum (1859), overfishing, the use of vegetable oil, and the substitution of steel for whalebones in corsets led to a steep decline in whaling in the later 19th century, but Norwegian innovations made hunting the hitherto "wrong" whales (rorquals, including the blue whale and the sei whale; so called because they sank when killed) commercially feasible, and the number of whales killed rose from under 2,000 to over 20,000 between 1900 and 1911. The Norwegians and the British dominated whaling into the mid 20th century, when overfishing again made it unprofitable for most nations, though not Japan and the Soviet Union, which became the chief whaling nations. Concern over the near extinction of many species led to the establishment in 1946 of the International Whaling Commission. Commercial whaling was prohibited altogether in 1986, but several nations refused to comply. At the beginning of the 21st century, Norway and Japan continued to hunt hundreds of nonendangered whales annually
whaling
{i} whale hunting, harpooning
whaling
Pertaining to, or employed in, the pursuit of whales; as, a whaling voyage; a whaling vessel
whaling
The hunting of whales
whale

    Türkische aussprache

    hweyl

    Aussprache

    /ˈhwāl/ /ˈhweɪl/

    Etymologie

    [ hwA(&)l, wA(&)l ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English, from Old English hwæl, from Proto-Germanic *hwalaz (compare German Wal, Danish hval), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kʷálos 'sheatfish' (compare German Wels, Latin squalus (“big sea fish”), Old Prussian kalis, Ancient Greek ... (áspalos), Avestan ... (kara, “kind of fish”)).

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