tenure

listen to the pronunciation of tenure
Englisch - Englisch
To grant tenure, the status of having a permanent academic position, to (someone)
a period of time during which it is possessed
a status of having a permanent post at an academic institution
a right to hold land under the feudal system
a status of possessing a thing or an office; an incumbency
the term during which a thing is held
{n} a condition, by which a man enjoys an estate
(APM 130) (Regent's Standing Order 103 9)
Whether a property is freehold or leasehold
This status is awarded to faculty members who have successfully and consistently met rigorous standards for research, teaching, and public service at UMB
Tenure is the legal right to live in a particular building or to use a particular piece of land during a fixed period of time. Lack of security of tenure was a reason for many families becoming homeless
the term during which some position is held
The consideration, condition, or service which the occupier of land gives to his lord or superior for the use of his land
Tenure (vested with a property interest in employment) is the employment status of a person who holds an academic appointment that is continuous until terminated by retirement or dismissal The termination of a continuous tenure appointment shall be only pursuant to University policy Only professors, associate professors and assistant professors are eligible for tenure
A status given to university faculty who have demonstrated high ability and achievement in their dedication to the growth of human knowledge
Period from the date of disbursement of loan to the date of closure of loan
A right of holding or occupying land or a position for a certain amount of time The term was first used in the English feudal land system, whereby all land belonged to the king but was lent out to lords for a certain period of time; the lord never owning, but having tenure in the land Used in modern law mostly to refer to a position a person occupies such as in the expression "a judge holds tenure for life and on good behavior "
Guaranteed job security, usually granted by law to teachers after a specified number of years of satisfactory service; it cannot be rescinded except for specified reasons
The length of time an employee remains with a specific employer
If you have tenure in your job, you have the right to keep it until you retire
All occupied housing units are classified as "owner occupied" or "renter occupied " The latter category includes those in which no cash rent is paid, such as places where a relative or a caretaker is allowed to live for free
The period of time for which a person is appointed This may be on a term or indeterminate basis
A system of land holdings for a temporary time period
The year a mutual fund's current portfolio manager took control A fund's performance track record is virtually meaningless if the current manager hasn't been running the fund for long The average fund manager sticks around for just 4 6 years See 7 Steps to Picking A Good Fund BACK TO TOP
Manner of holding, in general; as, in absolute governments, men hold their rights by a precarious tenure
give life-time employment to; "She was tenured after she published her book"
A common-law term referring to the way in which a piece of property is held, such as a fee simple or leasehold
1a) the condition of occupying or holding something in one's possession (e g an elective office or status as a student; 1b) the period of time during which something is held; 2) the status of holding a position on a permanent basis, without periodic contract renewals (e g a teacher may have or "hold tenure" or "be tenured")
The manner of holding lands and tenements of a superior
Tenure is the period of time during which someone holds an important job. the three-year tenure of President Bush
the right to hold property; part of an ancient hierarchical system of holding lands
Full-time faculty (regardless of funding source) whose coding in Banner HR indicates that they have tenure
A system in which after a very rigorous period (up to 7 years) of probationary evaluation, a faculty member is invited by the University to spend the rest of his or her productive academic career at the University
The act or right of holding, as property, especially real estate
the act, fact, or condition of holding something in one's possession, such as real estate
{i} strength, act of holding; period; permanence (especially as referring to one's status as an employee)
the right to hold property; part of an ancient hierarchical system of holding lands the term during which some position is held give life-time employment to; "She was tenured after she published her book
Guaranteed employment status given to teachers and professors after successful completion of certain requirements within a certain time period
The holding, particularly as to manner or term (i e period of time), of a property Land tenure may be broadly categorized into private lands, federal lands, and provincial Crown lands The Forest Act defines a number of forestry tenures by which the cutting of timber and other user rights to provincial Crown lands are assigned
The holding, particularly as to manner or term (i e , period of time), of a property Land tenure may be broadly categorized into private lands, federal lands and provincial Crown lands The Forest Act defines a number of forestry tenures by which the cutting of timber and other user rights to Crown land are assigned
A status accorded members of University faculty who have demonstrated high ability and achievement in their dedication to the growth of human knowledge
Tenure of Office Act
(1867) Law forbidding the U.S. president to remove civil officers without the consent of the Senate. Passed by the Radical Republicans over the veto of Pres. Andrew Johnson, the measure sought to prevent Johnson from removing cabinet members who supported Congress's harsh Reconstruction policies. When Johnson tried to dismiss his secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton, an ally of the Radical Republicans, Congress began impeachment proceedings against him. The law was partially repealed in 1869 and completely repealed in 1887; in 1926 it was found unconstitutional
feudal land tenure
System by which land was held by tenants from lords. In England and France, the king was lord paramount and master of the realm. He granted land to his lords, who granted land to their vassals and so on down to the occupying tenant. Tenures were divided into free and unfree. Free tenure included tenure in chivalry, as in the case of knight service, and socage (tenure by agricultural service fixed in amount and kind). The main type of unfree tenancy was villenage, a limited form of servitude. See also feudalism, fief, landlord and tenant, manorialism
getting tenure
being given permanent employment in a public institution
got tenure
received the status of a permanent employee (especially in public institutions)
has no tenure
does not have a permanent position or place (in a company, institution, etc.)
has tenure
permanently employed (in a public institution)
tenured
appointed for life and not subject to dismissal except for a grave crime; "an irremovable officer"; "a tenured professor
tenured
Having tenure
tenured
{s} having permanent status or position and not subject to dismissal with the exception of a serious illegal act, having tenure
tenures
plural of tenure
tenurial
{s} of tenure; of permanent status (about a job); of the right of possession
tenure
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