collocation

listen to the pronunciation of collocation
İngilizce - İngilizce
The statistically significant collocation of particular words in a language

In lexical studies collocation and semantic prosody/preference can only be quantified reliably on the basis of corpus data.

A method of determining coefficients in an expansion y(x) = y_{0}(x) + \sum_{l=0}^{q}\alpha_{l} y_{l}(x) so as to nullify the values of an ordinary differential equation L=0 at prescribed points
The grouping or juxtaposition of things, especially words or sounds

We said at first breāk fâst—“I broke fast at such an hour this morning:” he, or they, who first ventured to say I breakfasted were guilty of as heinous a violation of grammatical rule as he would be who should now declare I takedinnered, instead of I took dinner; but good usage came over to their side and ratified the blunder, because the community were minded to give a specific name to their earliest meal and to the act of partaking of it, and therefore converted the collocation breākfâst into the real compound brĕakfast.

{n} the act or art of placing together
An arrangement or juxtaposition of words or other elements, especially those that commonly co-occur, as 'rancid butter', 'bosom buddy', or 'dead serious'
the placing of two or more units at the same location
placing materials on similar subjects together on the shelves
– placement of equipment at common physical site to reduce environmental and financial impact and network deployment
Two points in space are collocated if they are coincident, within assembly tolerances
(kollokasjon): a pair or group of words which tend to occur together For example, pretty often collocates with nouns referring to women and girls, while handsome tends to collocate with nouns referring to men
The act of placing; the state of being placed with something else; disposition in place; arrangement
A process that attempts to keep all data belonging to a single client node or a single client file space on a minimal number of sequential access media volumes within a storage pool Collocation can reduce the number of volumes that must be accessed when a large amount of data must be restored
The process of keeping all data belonging to a single client node or a single client file space on a minimal number of sequential-access volumes within a storage pool Collocation can reduce the number of volumes that must be accessed when a large amount of data must be restored
The installation and maintenance of a computer at an Internet service provider (ISP) that belongs to another company or group A company might collocate one of its servers at an ISP to save costs or to make large-scale upgrades easier
Placement of multiple antennas at a common physical site to reduce environmental impact and real state costs and speed zoning approvals and network deployment
Placement of multiple antennas at a common physical site to reduce environmental impact and real estate costs and speed zoning approvals and net work deployment Collocation can be affected by competitive and interference factors Some companies act as brokers, arranging for sites and coordinating several carriers' antennas at a single site (Back to top )
The placement of in-service customer telecommunications equipment at a carrier's central office, point of presence or other network location
a grouping of words in a sentence
a grouping or juxtaposition of words that commonly occur together
Group of words associated together as an expression in the lexicon Our class has decided "in this particular case" is a collocation in McGowan's idiolect
The tendency for words to occur regularly with others: sit/chair, house/garage
the act of positioning close together (or side by side); "it is the result of the juxtaposition of contrasting colors"
In linguistics, collocation is the way that some words occur regularly whenever another word is used. the basic notion of collocation. the way in which some words are often used together, or a particular combination of words used in this way
patterns of words appearing together (*) (+) collocate: to appear together, or words that appear together (In the collocations 'apple tree', 'apple pie', and 'Adam's apple', 'apple' collocates with 'tree', 'pie', and 'Adam's' They are collocates )
The placement of words close to each other to provide cohesion and promote comprehension
is the process whereby some words seem to 'belong together' in a phrase Many idioms or idiomatic phrases exhibit collocation, e g in a jiffy
{i} relationship between two words or groups of words that go together and form a commonly-used phrase; act of placing together; act of arranging words side by side
words that usually go together; e g 'red in the face', which means 'angry'
The placement of competitors' equipment on telco premises so that they may interconnect directly (and cheaply) with the local telephone exchange
collocate
A component word of a collocation
collocate
To be often used together, form a collocation; for example strong collocates with tea
collocate
To arrange or occur side by side
collocate
{v} to place, set in order, station
collocate
{a} put into some place or station, set
collocate
group or chunk together in a certain order or place side by side have a strong tendency to occur side by side; "The words 'new' and 'world' collocate
collocate
In linguistics, a collocate of a particular word is another word which often occurs with that word
collocate
group or chunk together in a certain order or place side by side
collocate
{f} place together; arrange words side by side
collocate
To set or place; to set; to station
collocate
To arrange, or to occur side by side
collocate
In linguistics, if one word collocates with another, they often occur together. `Detached' collocates with `house'. when words collocate, they are often used together and sound natural together collocate with (past participle of collocare , from com- ( COM-) + locare ( LOCATE))
collocate
have a strong tendency to occur side by side; "The words 'new' and 'world' collocate"
collocate
Set; placed
collocations
plural of collocation
collocation

    Heceleme

    col·lo·ca·tion

    Telaffuz

    Etimoloji

    [ "kä-l&-'kA-sh&n ] (noun.) 1605. 1605. From Latin collocātiōnem collocāre. Compare French collocation. The technical sense in linguistics was established 1951, although it may have been used this way earlier.

    Günün kelimesi

    extramundane