rhyme

listen to the pronunciation of rhyme
İngilizce - Türkçe
kafiye

Sizin dilinizde kalp ağrı ile kafiyeli mi? - In your language, does heart rhyme with pain?

O kelimeler kafiyeli değil. - Those words don't rhyme.

{i} uyak
ile uyak oluşturmak
uyak düşürmek
şiir
{f} uyak düşür
uyaklı olmak
uyaklı şiir
şiir yazmak
şiir yaz/uyak yap
{f} kafiyeli söylemek
{f} kafiyeli yazmak
{f} (with) (ile) kafiyeli olmak
{f} kafiyeli şiir yazmak
uyaklı şiir/uyak
{i} kısa şiir
{f} kafiye yapmak
rime
{i} kırağı
rhyme or reason
anlam
rhyme or reason
akıl fikir
rhyme or reason
mantık
rhyme or reason
anlam, mantık, akıl fikir
rhyme scheme
Kafiye düzeni, uyak düzeni
rhyme, be similar in sound
kafiye, benzer bir ses olmak
rhyme, rime, poetry, rhymed verses
kafiye, kafiye, şiir, uyaklı ayetler
rhyme with
(Fiili Deyim ) uyaklı (kafiyeli) olmak
rhyme with
kafiyeli şiir yazmak
rhyme with
ile kafiyeli olmak
rime
şiir
rime
(Meteoroloji) kırağı bağlamak
rime
(Meteoroloji) kırağı düşmek
nursery rhyme
çocuk şiiri
Rime
rimen
neither rhyme nor reason
ne kafiye ne sebeple
without rhyme or reason
mantıksız
end rhyme
{i} uyak
end rhyme
{i} kafiye
internal rhyme
iç uyak
internal rhyme
iç kafiye
nursery rhyme
çocuk tekerlemesi
nursery rhyme
çocuk şarkısı
nursery rhyme
tekerleme

Favori tekerlemen hangisi? - What's your favorite nursery rhyme?

rhymed
{s} kafiyeli
rhymed
şiir yaz/uyak yap
rhymed
{s} uyaklı
rhymer
{i} acemi şair
rhymer
şair bozuntusu
rhyming
kafiyeli

Hanımın nasıl? anlamına gelen How's the trouble and strife? cümlesi, kafiyeli Cockney argosuna bir örnektir. - How's the trouble and strife? is an example of a sentence using Cockney rhyming slang.

rhyming
kafiye

Hanımın nasıl? anlamına gelen How's the trouble and strife? cümlesi, kafiyeli Cockney argosuna bir örnektir. - How's the trouble and strife? is an example of a sentence using Cockney rhyming slang.

rhyming
uyaklı
rhyming
kafiyeleme
rhyming
(isim) kafiyeleme
rime
kafiye
rime
{i} uyak
rime
(Askeri) KIRAĞI: Uçağın kanat yüzeylerinde meydana gelen kaba buz. Bu buz, gerilemeyi çoğaltır ve uçağın düz uçuş ve kaldırma yeteneğinin hızla kaybolmasına neden olur
rime
i., f., bak. rhyme
stave rhyme
aliterasyon
without rhyme or reason
ipe sapa gelmez
without rhyme or reason
(deyim) anlamsiz,sacma,ipe sapa gelmez
Türkçe - Türkçe

rhyme teriminin Türkçe Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

RİME
(Osmanlı Dönemi) f. Çapak
İngilizce - İngilizce
A word that rhymes with another

Awake is a rhyme for lake.

Verse, poetry

nursery rhyme.

Of a word, to be pronounced identically with another from the vowel in its stressed syllable to the end

Creation rhymes with integration.

To put words together so that they rhyme

I rewrote it to make it rhyme.

Of two or more words, to be pronounced identically from the vowel in the stressed syllable of each to the end of each

India and windier rhyme with each other in non-rhotic accents.

The fact of rhyming

Many editors say they don't want stories written in rhyme.

{n} harmony of verses, meter, poetry
{v} to make verses, jingle, agree
A rhyme is a word which rhymes with another word, or a set of lines which rhyme. The one rhyme for passion is fashion
correspondence of terminal sounds of words or of lines of verse "No more rhyming now, I mean it! / Anybody want a peanut?" -- The Princess Bride
{f} compose rhymes, write words or lines of poetry that end in similar sounds; be similar in sound, sound alike or identical
The similarity between syllable sounds at the end of two or more lines Example: The rain in Spain says mainly in the plane
To accord in rhyme or sound
The repetition of similar sounds at the ends of words, regardless of spelling (brigade/dismayed, eyes/cries, state/fate) In traditional stanza forms, rhymes appear at the ends of lines in a regular pattern, or rhyme scheme Internal rhyme refers to rhyme within a line of poetry ("In mist or cloud, on mast or shroud" —Coleridge) rhythm The recurrent alternation of accented (stressed) and unaccented syllables in the words and lines of a poem This may be regular, in which case it is referred to as metre, or it may be irregular, as in free verse
the positioning of two similarly-sounding words together to emphasize this agreement of sound Rhyme exists in two forms: end rhyme, where the last words on nearby lines rhyme, and internal rhyme, where the rhyme happens on the same line The variation of rhyme where final consonants agree but the preceeding vowels do not is called slant or imperfect (i e might, fought) Another variation involves words which appears as though they rhyme but are pronounced differently (i e great, feat)
To make rhymes, or verses
Rhyme is the use of rhyming words as a technique in poetry. If something is written in rhyme, it is written as a poem in which the lines rhyme. The plays are in rhyme
{i} similarity of sound at the end of words or lines of poetry; word that ends with a sound similar to that of another word
correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
A word answering in sound to another word
The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any
The occurrence of the same or similar sounds at the end of two or more words When the rhyme occurs in a final stressed syllable, it is said to be masculine: cat/hat, desire/fire, observe/deserve When the rhyme occurs in a final unstressed syllable, it is said to be feminine: longing/yearning The pattern of rhyme in a stanza or poem is shown usually by using a different letter for each final sound In a poem with an aabba rhyme scheme, the first, second, and fifth lines end in one sound, and the third and fourth lines end in another
The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant
compose rhymes
A word which has the same last sound as another word
Identity or similarity between the final sounds of words Usual at ends of lines of poetry
- the repetition of sounds (not spellings) in two or more words or phrases Eye rhyme is not a true rhyme, occurs when the spellings of words are similar but the pronunciations are different
Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance
The repetition of concluding sounds in different words
A rhyme is a short poem which has rhyming words at the ends of its lines. He was teaching Helen a little rhyme. see also nursery rhyme = verse
An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language
the repetition of the same ("perfect rhyme") or similar sounds, most often at the ends of lines
Verses, usually two, having this correspondence with each other; a couplet; a poem containing rhymes
To influence by rhyme
be similar in sound, especially with respect to the last syllable; "hat and cat rhyme"
If something happens or is done without rhyme or reason, there seems to be no logical reason for it to happen or be done. He picked people on a whim, without rhyme or reason. Type of echoing produced by the close placement of two or more words with similarly sounding final syllables. Rhyme is used in poetry (and occasionally in prose) to produce sounds that appeal to the ear and to unify and establish a poem's stanzaic form. End rhyme (i.e., rhyme used at the end of a line to echo the end of another line) is most common, but internal rhyme (occurring before the end of a line) is frequently used as an embellishment. Types of "true rhyme" include masculine rhyme, in which the two words end with the same vowel-consonant combination (stand/land); feminine rhyme (or double rhyme), in which two syllables rhyme (profession/discretion); and trisyllabic rhyme, in which three syllables rhyme (patinate/latinate)
a piece of poetry
If one word rhymes with another or if two words rhyme, they have a very similar sound. Words that rhyme with each other are often used in poems. June always rhymes with moon in old love songs. the sort of people who give their children names that rhyme: Donnie, Ronnie, Connie. a singer rhyming `eyes' with `realise'. rhymed couplets
To put into rhyme
the quality shared by words that have or end with the same sound
Refers to the repetition of similar sounds occurring at determined, or regular, intervals
If a poem or song rhymes, the lines end with words that have very similar sounds. In his efforts to make it rhyme he seems to have chosen the first word that comes into his head. rhyming couplets
correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds) compose rhymes be similar in sound, especially with respect to the last syllable; "hat and cat rhyme
When two or more words match in sound Example: "A sweet disorder in the dress/Kindles in clothes a wontonness" (Herrick pg 702)
rime
rhyme off
To list or recite quickly

Sitting in an armchair beside a blazing fire in a community centre, Mr. Saakashvili rhymed off a list of his government's accomplishments.

rhyme or reason
Logic. Common sense

He would often fly into an unexpected rage without rhyme or reason.

rhyme scheme
The pattern created by the rhymes at the ends of the lines of a stanza of poetry
rhyme schemes
plural form of rhyme scheme
rhyme royal
a stanza form having seven lines of iambic pentameter; introduced by Chaucer
rhyme scheme
The arrangement of rhymes in a poem or stanza
broken rhyme
The splitting of the final word in a line of poetry (onto the next line) such that a rhyme is formed from a syllable other than the last
dactylic rhyme
rhyme composed of dactyls
exact rhyme
Perfect rhyme
eye rhyme
Pairs of words (or syllables) that, because of their spelling, look as if they rhyme but, because of different pronunciation, do not
feminine rhyme
A disyllabic rhyme that occurs on an unaccented final syllable
forced rhyme
A rhyme that is produced by changing the normal spelling of a word, or by changing the normal structure of a phrase
half rhyme
An imperfect rhyme in which consonants agree, but vowels do not
head rhyme
The use of alliteration at the beginning of stressed syllables
imperfect rhyme
half rhyme
imperfect rhyme
near rhyme
internal rhyme
The rhyming of two words within the same line of verse
masculine rhyme
A simple rhyme on single stressed syllables
nursery rhyme
A short poem or song for children, mostly anonymous or handed down by folklore
oblique rhyme
half rhyme
perfect rhyme
A rhyme where the latter part of the word or phrase is identical sounding to another

Boy it is mighty high.

refractory rhyme
A word with no rhyme, a rhymeless word
rhymer
a person who composes or recites rhymes or simple poems
rime
ice formed by the rapid freezing of cold water droplets of fog onto a cold surface
rime
rhyme
rime
a film or slimy coating
rime
a coating or sheet of ice so formed
rime
the 2nd part of a syllable, from the vowel on, as opposed to the onset
slant rhyme
half rhyme
syllabic rhyme
verse that has a fixed number of syllables per line (though not always the same number of stressed syllables)
tail rhyme
rhyme in which the rhyming lines in each verse are followed by a shorter line; these shorter lines sometimes rhyme with each other
rhymer
{n} one who makes rhymes, a poet
rime
{n} a hoarfrost, fog, chink, hole, rhyme
double rhyme
a two-syllable rhyme; "`ended' and `blended' form a double rhyme
double rhyme
A two-syllable feminine rhyme, as in regal/eagle or ended/blended
end rhyme
{i} rhyme at the end of a poetry line
eye rhyme
`love' and `move'
eye rhyme
an imperfect rhyme e
eye rhyme
A rhyme consisting of words, such as lint and pint, with similar spellings but different sounds. Also called sight rhyme
feminine rhyme
A rhyme in which the final syllable is unstressed, as in feather/heather
feminine rhyme
rhyme where the final syllable is not emphasized, unstressed rhyme
head rhyme
Consonantal alliteration at the beginning of words. Also called beginning rhyme
internal rhyme
a rhyme between words in the same line
internal rhyme
- rhyme in which at least one of the rhymed words is buried within the line
internal rhyme
Rhyme which takes place within a line rather than at the end of it
internal rhyme
Involves rhyming sounds within the same line
internal rhyme
rhyme that occurs within a single line of Verse An example is in the opening line of Edgar Allan Poe's "The Raven": "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary " Here, "dreary" and "weary" make an internal rhyme
internal rhyme
Rhyme that occurs within a line of verse, as in "the grains beyond age, the dark veins of her mother" (Dylan Thomas)
internal rhyme
Also called middle rhyme, a rhyme occurring within the line The rhyme may be with words within the line but not at the line end, or with a word at the line end and a word within the line, as in Shelley's "The Cloud," I bring fresh showers, for the thirsting flowers (See also Leonine Verse)
leonine rhyme
A form of internal rhyme in which the word preceding the caesura rhymes with the final word in the line, as in: "For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams" (Edgar Allan Poe)
masculine rhyme
A rhyme made on a single stressed syllable, as in sky/fly
nursery rhyme
A nursery rhyme is a poem or song for young children, especially one that is old or well known. A short, rhymed poem or tale for children. a short traditional poem or song for children. Verse customarily told or sung to small children. Though the oral tradition of nursery rhymes is ancient, the largest number date from the 16th, 17th, and (most frequently) 18th centuries. Apparently most rhymes were originally composed for adults, many as popular ballads and songs. The earliest known published collection is Tommy Thumb's (Pretty) Song Book (1744), including "Little Tom Tucker," "Sing a Song of Sixpence," and "Who Killed Cock Robin?" The most influential collection was Mother Goose's Melody (1781), including "Jack and Jill," "Ding Dong Bell," and "Hush-a-bye Baby on the Tree Top
nursery rhyme
poem for children, playful song for kids
nursery rhyme
a tale in rhymed verse for children
off rhyme
A partial or imperfect rhyme, often using assonance or consonance only, as in dry and died or grown and moon. Also called half rhyme, near rhyme, oblique rhyme, slant rhyme
perfect rhyme
rhyme in which the words sound exactly the same except for the beginning letters
proper rhyme
rhyming of two consonants and a vowel (Poetry)
rhymed
{s} matched with another word that ends in a similar sound
rhymed
having corrnesponding sounds especially terminal sounds; "rhymed verse"; "rhyming words
rhymed
having corrnesponding sounds especially terminal sounds; "rhymed verse"; "rhyming words"
rhymed
past of rhyme
rhymer
Thomas the Rhymer Thomas Learmount, of Ercildoune, who lived in the thirteenth century This was quite a different person to Thomas Rymer, the historiographer royal to William III (who flourished 1283) (See True Thomas )
rhymer
a writer who composes rhymes; a maker of poor verses (usually used as terms of contempt for minor or inferior poets)
rhymer
{i} poetaster, one who makes rhymes, writer of inferior poetry
rhymer
One who makes rhymes; a versifier; generally in contempt; a poor poet; a poetaster
rhymer
An editorial term that describes picture books in which the story is presented in rhyme Rhymers fall in and out of favor with editors, and are more difficult to sell than picture books told in narrative style (See "Pretty No-Nos ")
rhymes
third-person singular of rhyme
rhymes
plural of rhyme
rhyming
having corrnesponding sounds especially terminal sounds; "rhymed verse"; "rhyming words"
rhyming
{i} composition of rhymes, act of writing words or lines of poetry that end in similar sounds
rhyming
{s} having similar sounds, ending with the same sound
rime
{i} similarity of sound at the end of words or lines of poetry (also rhyme); word that ends with a sound similar to that of another word (also rhyme); thin white coating of ice crystals
rime
A rough, white icy covering deposited on trees, or other exposed objects, somewhat resembling white frost, but formed only from fog or vapor-bearing air
rime
the 2nd part of a syllable, from the vowel on; as opposed to the onset
rime
The rapid freezing of supercooled water droplets as they touch an exposed object, forming a white opaque granular deposit of ice It is one of the results of an ice storm, and when formed on aircraft it is called rime icing
rime
the first vowel in a word and all the sounds that follow
rime
Fog frozen into a sheet of ice; hoarfrost
rime
A step or round of a ladder; a rung
rime
be similar in sound, especially with respect to the last syllable; "hat and cat rhyme"
rime
The rime of a word consists of all the sounds from the vowel to the end of the word For example, in the word street, the rime is eet This rime sound might be taught with other words that rhyme, such as meet and feet Most dictionaries simply list "rime" as a variation of "rhyme "
rime
To freeze or congeal into hoarfrost
rime
White frost; hoarfrost; congealed dew or vapor
rime
An accumulation of granular ice tufts on the windward sides of exposed objects that is formed from supercooled fog or cloud and built out directly against the wind
rime
{f} compose rhymes, write words or lines of poetry that end in similar sounds (also rhyme); be similar in sound, sound alike or identical (also rhyme); cover with frost, coat with a thin white layer of ice crystals
rime
A rent or long aperture; a chink; a fissure; a crack
rime
correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
rime
ice crystals forming a white deposit (especially on objects outside)
rime
Variant of rhyme. frost (=powdery ice)
rime
compose rhymes
rime
(Tibetan "unbiased")
rimed
covered in frost
rimed
covered with frost; "a frosty glass"; "hedgerows were rimed and stiff with frost"-Wm Faulkner
rimes
plural of rime
triple rhyme
A rhyme involving three syllables, as in vanity/humanity
vowel rhyme
{i} assonance, resemblance of sounds in words or in syllables, repetition of vowel sounds
without rhyme or reason
not making any sense, without any logic
rhyme