parish

listen to the pronunciation of parish
İngilizce - İngilizce
A civil subdivision of a British county, often corresponding to an earlier ecclesiastical parish
The community attending that church; the members of the parish
In the Anglican, Eastern Orthodox and Catholic Church or certain civil government entities such as the state of Louisiana, an administrative part of a diocese that has its own church
An administrative subdivision in Louisiana that is equivalent to a county in other U.S. states
the ecclesiastical district in charge of a pastor
{n} a particular district or division of land under a minister having the cure of fouls, a religious society or corporation
{a} belonging to or maintained by a parish
(English) A church district
That circuit of ground committed to the charge of one parson or vicar, or other minister having cure of souls therein
an area from which the congregation of a church (sometimes churches) is drawn and under the care of a member of the clergy For historical reasons, these are called chaplaincies in the Diocese in Europe
A geopolitical division, equivalent to a county
In Louisiana, a civil division corresponding to a county in other States
The district assigned to the ministration of a single priest (with or without assistants)
A community of the faithful served by a pastor charged with responsibility for providing them with full pastoral service Most parishes are territorial, embracing all of the faithful in a certain area of a diocese: some are personal or national, for certain classes of people, without strict regard for their places of residence
the local subdivision of a diocese committed to one pastor
Of or pertaining to a parish; parochial; as, a parish church; parish records; a parish priest; maintained by the parish; as, parish poor
A parish is a small country area in England which has its own elected council. elected representatives, such as County and Parish Councillors
The same district, constituting a civil jurisdiction, with its own officers and regulations, as respects the poor, taxes, etc
The territory covered by one parson or minister
an area under the pastoral care of a priest, himself under the jurisdiction of a bishop; the parish church was the centre of worship for the parish
a congregation that is financially self-supporting
An ecclesiastical society, usually not bounded by territorial limits, but composed of those persons who choose to unite under the charge of a particular priest, clergyman, or minister; also, loosely, the territory in which the members of a congregation live
A parish is a village or part of a town which has its own church and priest. the parish of St Mark's, Lakenham a 13th century parish church
area within a diocesie, having its own church and clergyman
A specific community of the Christian faithful within a diocese, which has its own church building, under the authority of a pastor who is responsible for providing them with ministerial service Most parishes are formed on a geographic basis, but they may be formed along national or ethnic lines
In some churches, the geographical territory of a local church In general, the constituency of a local church; that is, all the people who are members or who informally consider it to be their church In many churches, congregation is used for this term
ecclesiastical division or jurisdiction; the site of a church
{i} congregation, community; flock; region, area
the group of people of a certain area who are organized into a local church; sometimes the word also refers to the geographic region around a church In the South many of the present-day counties were once referred to as parishes [as is still the case in Louisiana]; mostly a reference to the local congregation
A subdivision of a county often coinciding with the church to form a unit of local government
The group of people of a certain area who are organized into a local, self-supporting church Sometimes the word is used to refer to the geographic region around a church In the South, many of the present-day counties were once organized as parishes [as is still the case in Louisiana] See Mission
Worshiping community of Christians who gather weekly at Christ's altar to experience God's redemptive love by celebrating the eucharist, and who then carry on this redemptive work in the world
per "A Hornbook of VA History", "When the first English settlers came to Virginia in 1607 they followed the familiar patterns of the Church of England and established parishes that served as local units of ecclesiastical and community organization ---In Colonial Virginia the General Assembly established parishes and fixed their boundaries, often at the same time that it created or altered counties A decade after independence, on 16 Jan 1786, the General Assembly passed Thomas Jefferson's Bill for Establishing Religious Freedom, ending state-enforced support for the formally established church and its parishes "
A subdivision or unit of local government
A Louisiana state district Analogous to the word "county"
a local church community the local subdivision of a diocese committed to one pastor
In the Anglican and Roman Catholic church, an administrative part of a diocese that has its own church
A community of the faithful in the diocese which has its own church building, under the authority of a Pastor who is responsible for providing ministerial service Most parishes are defined geographically, but they can be formed along national or ethnic lines
The area around a Church for which a priest is responsible
Ecclesiastical division or jurisdiction The site of a church In the State of Louisiana, equivalent of (though not quite the same as) a county
a local church community
parish church
A church which acts as the religious centre of a parish; the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches
parish house
a rectory or vicarage
parish register
A book, held in a parish church, in which baptisms, marriages and burials are recorded
parish church
the main Christian church in a particular area
parish clerk
an official who works for a Christian church in a particular town or area
parish pump
concerned only with what happens in a small local area
parish register
an official record of the births, deaths, and marriages in a parish
a dumb priest never got a parish
Those who fail to speak up fail to get what they want
parish.
par
purser rigged and parish damned
Having joined the United States Navy|United States Navy]], either because of destitution or in order to desert their problems on land

of a purser rigged and parish damned - when the tyro first mounts the linen frock and blue jacket, aptly manufactured for him in a State Prison ashore.

Elijah Parish Lovejoy
born Nov. 9, 1802, Albion, Maine, U.S. died Nov. 7, 1837, Alton, Ill. U.S. newspaper editor and abolitionist. He moved to St. Louis in 1827. In 1833 he became editor of the St. Louis Observer, a Presbyterian weekly in which he wrote articles strongly condemning slavery. Under the threat of mob violence (1836), he moved his paper from the slave state of Missouri across the river to Alton, in the free state of Illinois. There mobs repeatedly destroyed his presses, and he was shot and killed while defending his building against an attack. News of his death strengthened abolitionist sentiment
Maxfield Parish
a US artist famous for his illustrations (=pictures in books) , which are romantic and colourful, and show light in a slightly surreal way (1870-1966)
parishes
plural of parish
parish

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    pa·rish

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    pärîş

    Telaffuz

    /ˈparəsʜ/ /ˈpærɪʃ/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'par-ish ] (noun.) 14th century. Old French paroisse, from Late Latin parochia, from Ancient Greek παρоικία (paroikia, “a dwelling abroad”), from πάρоικος (paroikos, “neighboring, foreigner”), from παρά (para, “beside”) + οἶκος (oikos, “house”).

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