manure

listen to the pronunciation of manure
İngilizce - İngilizce
To cultivate by manual labor; to till; hence, to develop by culture
To apply manure (as fertilizer or soil improver)
Animal excrement, especially that of common domestic farm animals and when used as fertilizer. Generally speaking, from cows, horses, sheep, pigs and chickens
{v} to dung, to enrich
{n} soil for land
any animal or plant material used to fertilize land especially animal excreta usually with litter material spread manure, as for fertilization
{f} fertilize with manure, spread or treat land with organic material
Manure is animal faeces, sometimes mixed with chemicals, that is spread on the ground in order to make plants grow healthy and strong. bags of manure. waste matter from animals that is mixed with soil to improve the soil and help plants grow (manouvrer , from manu operare; MANEUVER). Organic material that is used to fertilize land, usually consisting of the feces and urine of domestic livestock, with or without litter such as straw, hay, or bedding. Some countries also use human excrement ("night soil"). Though livestock manure is less rich in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potash than synthetic fertilizers and therefore must be applied in much greater quantities, it is rich in organic matter, or humus, and thus improves the capacity of the soil to absorb and store water, thereby preventing erosion. Because manure must be carefully stored and spread in order to derive the most benefit, some farmers decline to expend the necessary time and effort. Manufactured chemical fertilizers, though more concentrated and efficient, are also more costly and more likely to cause excess runoff and pollution. See also green manure
Excreta of animals, with or without an admixture of bedding or litter, fresh or at various stages of decomposition or composting In some countries the term may denote any fertilizer material
Animal excrement, especially that of common domestic farm animals and when used as fertilizer. Generally speaking, from cows, horses, pigs and chickens
The excreta of animals, with or without an admixture of bedding or litter, fresh or at various stages of further decomposition or composting In some countries may denote any fertilizer material
The fecal and urinary defecation of livestock; may include spilled feed, bedding litter, or soil (USEPA, 1993)
Natural fertiliser from animals, also give soil better structure
Animal feces and urine plus materials such as bedding and water
To apply manure to; to enrich, as land, by the application of a fertilizing substance
Nitrogen feeds the microorganisms in soil that make humus from a compost pile Manure is rich in nitrogen (especially chicken, goat, and steer manures), and is thus a valuable component of compost It is also rich in potassium and phosphorus Manure should be composted (or at least aged) before use in the garden because of its high nitrogen --and ammonia-- content, which can both easily burn plants Composting will also kill any weed seeds that may have survived the animal's stomach(s)
the fecal and urinary defecation of livestock and poultry List of Glossary Terms
spread manure, as for fertilization
Any matter which makes land productive; a fertilizing substance, as the contents of stables and barnyards, dung, decaying animal or vegetable substances, etc
any animal or plant material used to fertilize land especially animal excreta usually with litter material
{i} waste, animal dung; fertilizer
The fecal and urinary excretion of livestock This material may also contain bedding, spilled feed, water or soil It may also include wastes not associated with livestock excreta, such as hair, skin, or other debris Manure can be categorized based on solids and moisture content The transition from one category to another (liquid to semi-solid to solid) is not sharply defined The transition does not depend on percent solids alone but is affected by type of livestock manure and livestock feed diet, type and amount of bedding, feed spillage, and other residues in the manure
green manure
A crop that is ploughed into the soil to improve its fertility
chicken manure
chicken excreta used as fertilizer
cow manure
cow excreta used as fertilizer
green manure
a growing crop that is plowed under to enrich soil
green manure
A growing crop, such as clover or grass, that is plowed under the soil to improve fertility. Crop grown and plowed under for its beneficial effects to the soil and subsequent crops, though during its growth it may be grazed. These crops are usually annuals, either grasses or legumes. They add nitrogen to the soil, increase the general fertility level, reduce erosion, improve the physical condition of the soil, and reduce nutrient loss from leaching. They are usually planted in the fall and turned under in the spring before the summer crop is sown. See also cover crop
green manure
plants used as fertilizer
horse manure
horse excreta used as fertilizer
manured
past of manure
manures
third-person singular of manure
manuring
The act of process of applying manure; also, the manure applied
manuring
present participle of manure
manure