swank

listen to the pronunciation of swank
English - English
Fashionably elegant

I went to a swank party last night.

A fashionably elegant person

He's such a swank.

To swagger, to show off

Looks like she's going to swank in, flashing her diamonds, then swan out to another party.

Ostentation

Not even the effeminate swank of his riding clothes could hide the enormous power of that body--he seemed to fill those glistening boots until he strained the top lacing and you could see a great pack of muscle shifting when his shoulder moved under his thin coat.

{i} smartness, elegance; swagger, proud and arrogant behavior
elegance by virtue of being fashionable
{f} show off, behave in an arrogant or boastful manner
imposingly fashionable and elegant; "a swank apartment
display proudly; act ostentatiously or pretentiously; "he showed off his new sports car"
To swagger
disapproval If someone is swanking, they are speaking about things they own or things they have achieved, in order to impress other people. I have always been against swanking about all the things I have been lucky enough to win. = boast, brag. to speak or behave in a way that shows you think you are better than other people. proud, confident behaviour that shows you think you are better than other people
imposingly fashionable and elegant; "a swank apartment"
swanked
past of swank
swanking
present participle of swank
swanks
third-person singular of swank
swanky
An active and clever young fellow
swanky
{s} elegant, classy; luxurious
swanky
If you describe something as swanky, you mean that it is fashionable and expensive. one of the swanky hotels that line the Pacific shore at Acapulco. = ritzy. very fashionable and expensive (swank (19-21 centuries), perhaps from swanken )
swanky
Rather posh, elegant, ritzy
swanky
imposingly fashionable and elegant; "a swank apartment"
swank

    Turkish pronunciation

    swängk

    Pronunciation

    /ˈswaɴɢk/ /ˈswæŋk/

    Etymology

    [ 'swa[ng]k ] (adjective.) 1773. Perhaps from swanky, or perhaps from an Old English root, related to the Scots swank and the Middle High German swanken, modern German schwanken ("to sway").

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