quagmire

listen to the pronunciation of quagmire
English - Turkish
bataklık
{i} çıkmaz
{i} batak

Savaş hızla bir bataklığa dönüştü. - The war quickly turned into a quagmire.

Yağmur yolu bataklığa çevirdi. - The rain turned the road into a quagmire.

be caught in a quagmire
çıkmazda olmak
be caught in a quagmire
bataklığa saplanmak
be caught in a quagmire
batağa saplanmak
English - English
A perilous, mixed up and troubled situation; a hopeless tangle; a predicament

Those election results are a quagmire for any coalition except one of national union.

A swampy, soggy area of ground

That quagmire regularly 'swallows' caught-up hikers' boots.

{n} a bog, boggy place, shaking marsh
A quagmire is a soft, wet area of land which your feet sink into if you try to walk across it. Rain had turned the grass into a quagmire
{i} soft wet ground that gives way underfoot; mud, wet soft earth; swamp, bog; difficult problem or situation
A mixed up and troubled situation; a hopeless tangle; a predicament
a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
Soft, wet, miry land, which shakes or yields under the feet
A quagmire is a difficult, complicated, or unpleasant situation which is not easy to avoid or escape from. His people had fallen further and further into a quagmire of confusion
quag
A quagmire
quag
got into a quagmire
got into a difficult situation
pulled him out of the quagmire
helped him to escape from the problems that he had fallen into
quagmires
plural of quagmire
quagmire

    Hyphenation

    quag·mire

    Turkish pronunciation

    kwägmayır

    Pronunciation

    /ˈkwagˌmīər/ /ˈkwæɡˌmaɪɜr/

    Etymology

    [ 'kwag-"mIr, 'kwäg- ] (noun.) circa 1580. Recorded since 1579, from two virtual synonyms: obsolete quag (“bog, marsh”) (a variant of Middle English quabbe (“a marsh, bog”), from Old English *cwabba (“shake, tremble like something soft and flabby”); cognate with Dutch kwab) + mire (from Middle English, from Old Norse mýrr, akin to Old English mōs (“marsh”) and English moss). The sense "difficult situation, inextricable position" is recorded since 1775.“” in the Online Etymology Dictionary, Douglas Harper, 2001 Alternative: Apparently a var. of the earlier quakemire quake + mire. in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

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