axiomatic

listen to the pronunciation of axiomatic
English - English
Obvious
Of or pertaining to an axiom
Evident without proof or argument

It is axiomatic that the physical entry of the home is the chief evil against which the wording of the Fourth Amendment is directed..

evident without proof or argument; "an axiomatic truth"; "we hold these truths to be self-evident"
of or relating to or derived from axioms; "axiomatic physics"; "the postulational method was applied to geometry"- S
of or relating to or derived from axioms; "axiomatic physics"; "the postulational method was applied to geometry"- S S Stevens
If something is axiomatic, it seems to be obviously true. = self-evident. something that is axiomatic does not need to be proved because you can easily see that it is true = self-evident
obvious (layman)
Stevens containing aphorisms or maxims; "axiomatic wisdom
{s} self-evident, certain, unquestioned
containing aphorisms or maxims; "axiomatic wisdom"
evident without proof or argument; "an axiomatic truth"; "we hold these truths to be self-evident" of or relating to or derived from axioms; "axiomatic physics"; "the postulational method was applied to geometry"- S
Of or pertaining to an axiom; having the nature of an axiom; self-evident; characterized by axioms
axiomatic system
A set of axioms from which theorems can be derived
axiomatic systems
plural form of axiomatic system
axiomatic method
In logic, the procedure by which an entire science or system of theorems is deduced in accordance with specified rules by logical deduction from certain basic propositions (axioms), which in turn are constructed from a few terms taken as primitive. These terms may be either arbitrarily defined or conceived according to a model in which some intuitive warrant for their truth is felt to exist. The oldest examples of axiomatized systems are Aristotle's syllogistic and Euclidean geometry. Early in the 20th century, Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead attempted to formalize all of mathematics in an axiomatic manner. Scholars have even subjected the empirical sciences to this method, as in J. H. Woodger's The Axiomatic Method in Biology (1937) and Clark Hull's Principles of Behavior (1943)
axiomatically
By the use of axioms; in the form of an axiom
axiomatically
on the basis of axioms; "this is axiomatically given
axiomatically
in an axiomatic manner (self-evident, certain, unquestioned)
axiomatic
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