refract

listen to the pronunciation of refract
Englisch - Englisch
To cause (light) to change direction as a result of entering a different medium

A prism can refract light.

To change direction as a result of entering a different medium
to bend or turn from a direct course
{v} to break the course of rays
subject to refraction; "refract a light beam"
To bend sharply and abruptly back; to break off
When light bends at an interface between two transparent materials We find many things in our everyday experience refracting light: glass, water, air, plastic The illusion of a broken leg dangling in the pool is due to the refraction of light See also index of refraction
To cause a change in direction of a ray of light so that it appears to bend
determine the refracting power of (a lens) subject to refraction; "refract a light beam
When a ray of light or a sound wave refracts or is refracted, the path it follows bends at a particular point, for example when it enters water or glass. As we age the lenses of the eyes thicken, and thus refract light differently. surfaces that cause the light to reflect and refract. + refraction re·frac·tion the refraction of the light on the dancing waves. if glass or water refracts light, the light changes direction when it passes through the glass or water (past participle of refringere , from frangere )
To change direction
determine the refracting power of (a lens)
{f} cause energy or light waves to bend as they pass from one medium into a second medium in which the energy travels at a different speed
To bend or change direction
Bend or slant rays of light
To cause (light) to change direction as a result of entering a diffrent medium
To break the natural course of, as rays of light orr heat, when passing from one transparent medium to another of different density; to cause to deviate from a direct course by an action distinct from reflection; as, a dense medium refrcts the rays of light as they pass into it from a rare medium
refracted
Simple past tense and past participle of refract
refraction
The turning or bending of any wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes from one medium into another of different optical density
refraction
The degree to which a metal or compound can withstand heat
refracted
{a} in botany, bent back to an acute angle
refraction
{n} a variation of the rays of light from a direct course
refracted
Turned from a direct course by refraction; as, refracted rays of light
refracted
past of refract
refracted
Bent backward angularly, as if half- broken; as, a refracted stem or leaf
refracting
present participle of refract
refracting
Serving or tending to refract; as, a refracting medium
refracting
{s} tending to refract
refraction
The bending of a wave disturbance as it passes obliquely from one medium into another in which the disturbance has a different velocity
refraction
(1) The deflection of the ray path of a seismic wave caused by its passage from one material to another having different elastic properties (2) Bending of a tsunami wave front owing to variations in the water depth along a coastline
refraction
The process by which the direction of light changes as it passes obliquely from one medium to another in which its speed is different
refraction
the bending of waves when they pass from one transparent medium (or vacuum) to another (e g , sunlight bending as it passes through the Earth's atmosphere)
refraction
The correction which is to be deducted from the apparent altitude of a heavenly body on account of atmospheric refraction, in order to obtain the true altitude
refraction
Change in direction of light ray when passing from one medium to another
refraction
the change of direction of a ray of light in passing obliquely from one medium into another in which the speed of propagation differs
refraction
a test to determine the refractive power of the eye; also, the bending of light as it passes from one medium into another
refraction
The bending of light or radar beam as it passes through a zone of contrasting properties, such as atmospheric density, water vapor, or temperature
refraction
The change in direction of a ray of light in oblique passage from one transparent medium to another of different density, caused by the effect of a change of velocity of the light waves
refraction
The change of direction or speed of light as it passes from one medium to another
refraction
{i} bending of light or energy as it passes from one medium into a second medium in which the energy travels at a different speed
refraction
The change in the direction of ray of light, heat, or the like, when it enters obliquely a medium of a different density from that through which it has previously moved
refraction
the change in direction of a propagating wave (light or sound) when passing from one medium to another
refraction
The bending of a beam of light at an interface between two dissimilar media or a medium whose refractive index is a continuous function of position (graded index medium)
refraction
The bending of a beam of light at an interface between two dissimilar media or in a medium whose refractive index is a continuous function of position (graded-index medium)
refraction
(1) The deflection, or bending, of the ray path of a seismic wave caused by its passage from one material to another having different elastic properties (2) Bending of a tsunami wave front owing to variations in the water depth along a coastline
refraction
When a ray of light passes from one medium to another, the difference in the speed of light in the medium results in an apparent bending of the light at the interface This is known as refraction See the section on specular transmission for details
refraction
The bending of elecrtomagnetic rays as they pass from one medium to another
refraction
the bending of electromagnetic radiation by its passage through a medium of a high refractive index Light is refracted by passing through a lens, water, or the atmosphere
refraction
The change of direction of propagation of any wave, such as an electromagnetic wave, when it passes from one medium to another in which the wave velocity is different Simply put, the bending of incident rays as they pass from one medium to another, such as air to water
refraction
The process in which the direction of energy propagation is changed as the result of a change in density within the propagating medium, or as the energy passes through the interface representing a density discontinuity between two media In the first instance the rays undergo a smooth bending over a finite distance In the second case the index of refraction changes through an interfacial layer that is thin compared to the wavelength of the radiation; thus, the refraction is abrupt, essentially discontinuous See atmospheric refraction Compare reflection, diffraction, scattering
refraction
Change in direction of a wave as it leaves one medium and enters another. Waves, such as sound and light waves, travel at different speeds in different media. When a wave enters a new medium at an angle of less than 90°, the change in speed occurs sooner on one side of the wave than on the other, causing the wave to bend, or refract. When water waves approach shallower water at an angle, they bend and become parallel to the shore. Refraction explains the apparent bending of a pencil when it is partly immersed in water and viewed from above the surface. It also causes the optical illusion of the mirage
refraction
The change in the direction of a ray of light, and, consequently, in the apparent position of a heavenly body from which it emanates, arising from its passage through the earth's atmosphere; hence distinguished as atmospheric refraction, or astronomical refraction
refraction
The bending of a beam of light through an interface between two dissimilar media or in a medium whose refractive index is a continuous function of position (such as graded-index fiber)
refraction
The bending of light wave as they pass from one medium to another
refraction
The change in direction of an electromagnetic wave resulting from changes in the velocity of propagation of the medium through which it passes
refraction
The act of refracting, or the state of being refracted
refraction
the amount by which a propagating wave is bent
refraction
The bending of light as it passes from one medium into another; the amount of bending depends on the speeds of light in the two media
refraction
The phenomenon of a beam of light bending as the light's velocity changes This occurs when the refractive index of the material through which the light is passing changes Let i be the normalized incident ray vector (pointing towards the surface), which has unit surface normal n If t is the transmitted (refracted) vector inside a transparent medium, then: where is the ratio of the refractive indices of the inside and outside media (See Snell's law )
refraction
The bending of light rays as they pass through a transmission medium of one refractive index into a medium with a different refractive index
refraction
The bending of light at a particular angle as it passes through a transparent medium (such as glass or water) Rainbows are causes by light refracting and reflecting (twice) inside raindrops
refracts
third-person singular of refract
refract

    Silbentrennung

    re·fract

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    [ ri-'frakt ] (transitive verb.) 1612. * From Latin refractum, the neutralal inflection of refractus, the past participle of refringere, itself from re- 'again' + frangere 'to break'.

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