modal

listen to the pronunciation of modal
Englisch - Englisch
A modal proposition
A modal form, notably a modal auxiliary
of, relating to, or composed in the musical modi by which an octave is divided, associated with emotional moods in Ancient - and in medieval ecclesiastical music
Having separate modes in which user input has different effects
of, relating to, or describing the mood of a clause
of, or relating to a mode or modus
of, or relating to the modality between propositions
requiring immediate user interaction (often used as modal dialog or modal window)
relating to the statistical mode
{a} relating to the mode or form, formal
of or relating to a musical mode; especially written in an ecclesiastical mode
relating to or expressing the mood of a verb; "modal auxiliary" of or relating to a musical mode; especially written in an ecclesiastical mode
relating to or constituting the most frequent value in a distribution; "the modal age at which American novelists reach their peak is 30"
relating to or expressing the mood of a verb; "modal auxiliary"
Having to do with modes; this term is applied most particularly to music that is based upon the Gregorian modes, rather than to music based upon the major, minor, or any other scale Miles Davis was a pioneer of modal jazz with the seminal 'Kind of Blue' Search Google com for Modal
A type of auxiliary verb that is always the first word(s) in a verb phrase The most common modals are can, could, may, might, must, ought, shall, should, will and would: He should hit the ball over the fence
{s} of form, of manner; pertaining to mood (Grammar); pertaining to mode, in a key other than major or minor (Music)
of, or relating to a mode
A dialog is modal if its parent application is blocked from further activity until the dialog has completed See non-modal
Indicating, or pertaining to, some mode of conceiving existence, or of expressing thought
In grammar, a modal or a modal auxiliary is a word such as `can' or `would' which is used with a main verb to express ideas such as possibility, intention, or necessity. a modal verb
A DialogBox that requires a response before you can interact with other components in an application
A restrictive or limiting interaction because of operating in a mode Modal often describes a secondary window that restricts a user's interaction with other windows A secondary window can be modal with respect to its primary window or to the entire system Compare modeless
(as contrasted to modeless) a modal form requires you to finish with it before you can access other forms or the main menu (within the same application)
to execute a procedure, a window is opened Modal means: the window must first be closed again before a new function can be executed outside of the open window Non-modal means that procedures can be executed in parallel in several windows
a modal auxiliary
Pertaining to modes
Modal means of or relating to, or characteristic of a mode, which is any numerous patterns of wave motions, as of acoustic waves
A dialog that must be closed before the user can take further action
a type of cellulosic fibre having improved strength and modulus when wet
of, or relating to modality
A system of harmony in which the chords do not relate to any specific key center Each new chord seems to come from a different key and suggest the use of a different scale
French Use Exemples
of, relating to, or composed in the moods of medieval ecclesiastical music
music that is based upon scales (often lesser used ones) rather than upon chord relationships
Of, relating to, or constituting a grammatical form or category characteristically indicating prediction of an action or state in some manner other than as is a simple fact
Of or pertaining to a mode or mood; consisting in mode or form only; relating to form; having the form without the essence or reality
modal auxiliaries
plural form of modal auxiliary
modal auxiliary
a verb used to express the mood (or tense) of another verb

Note: In the English language they are can,could, may, might, must, ought to, shall, should, will and would.

modal case
case to express ability, intention, necessity, obligation, permission, possibility, etc
modal cases
plural form of modal case
modal logic
Any formal system that attempts to deal with modalities, such as possibility and necessity, but also obligation and permission
modal scale
A tonal scale used in most forms of Western music
modal verb
An auxiliary verb whose primary function is to express mood
modal verbs
plural form of modal verb
modal auxiliary
A verb characteristically used with other verbs to express mood or tense. In English, the modal auxiliaries are can, may, must, ought, shall, should, will, and would. Also called modal. a modal verb
modal auxiliary
helping verb, auxiliary verb
modal logic
Formal systems incorporating modalities such as necessity, possibility, impossibility, contingency, strict implication, and certain other closely related concepts. The most straightforward way of constructing a modal logic is to add to some standard nonmodal logical system a new primitive operator intended to represent one of the modalities, to define other modal operators in terms of it, and to add axioms and/or transformation rules involving those modal operators. For example, one may add the symbol L, which means "It is necessary that," to classical propositional calculus; thus, Lp is read as "It is necessary that p." The possibility operator M ("It is possible that") may be defined in terms of L as Mp = Lp (where means "not"). In addition to the axioms and rules of inference of classical propositional logic, such a system might have two axioms and one rule of inference of its own. Some characteristic axioms of modal logic are: (A1) Lp p and (A2) L(p q) (Lp Lq). The new rule of inference in this system is the Rule of Necessitation: If p is a theorem of the system, then so is Lp. Stronger systems of modal logic can be obtained by adding additional axioms. Some add the axiom Lp LLp; others add the axiom Mp LMp
modal logic
a system of logic whose formal properties resemble certain moral and epistemological concepts the logical study of necessity and possibility
modal share
The percentage of trips using a given mode of travel
modal share
The percentage of total passengers or freight moved by a particular type of transportation
modal share
The ratio of trips of a specific travel mode over the total number of trips
modal split
A term which describes how many people use alternative forms of transportation Frequently used to describe the percentage of people using private automobiles as opposed to the percentage using public transportation
modal split
The relative use that companies make of transportation modes; the statistics include ton-miles, passenger-miles, and revenue
modal split
In transportation planning, the identification of the numbers of persons opting for one mode of transportation over another
modal split
Français : Répartition modale Deutsch : Modal Split
modal split
1 The proportion of total person trips that uses each of the various specified modes of transportation 2 The process of separating total person trips into the modes of travel used 3 A term that describes how many people use alternative forms of transportation It is used frequently to describe the percentage of people who use private automobiles in comparison to the percentage who use public transportation Also: A term which describes how many people use alternative forms of transportation Frequently used to describe the percentage of people using private automobiles as opposed to the percentage using public transportation
modal split
1) The proportion of total person trips that uses each of various specified modes of transportation 2) The process of separating total person trips into the modes of travel used 3) A term that describes how many people use alternative forms of transportation It is frequently used to describe the percentage of people who use private automobiles, as opposed to the percentage who user public transportation
modal verb
one of these verb forms: can, could, may, might, shall, should, will, would, must, ought to, used to, need, had better, and dare. They are all used with other verbs to express ideas such as possibility, permission, or intention auxiliary verb
modal verb
{i} (Grammar) auxiliary verb that expresses possibility or necessity (such as: will, shall, should, must)
modal(a)
relating to or constituting the most frequent value in a distribution; "the modal age at which American novelists reach their peak is 30
essive-modal
The essive-modal case. In the Hungarian language this case can express the state, capacity, task in which somebody is or which somebody has (essive case, e.g. "as a reward", "for example"), or the manner in which the action is carried out, or the language which somebody knows (modal case, e.g. "unexpectedly", "speak English")
cross-modal
relating to different sense modalities
modally
In a modal manner
modals
plural of modal
modals
nine verbs (also known as helping verbs) that are always used in combination with other verbs: can, could, may, might, shall, should, will, would, must
multi-modal
A system that operates using multiple interfaces (for example, both text and speech)
multi-modal
– facilities serving more than one transportation mode
multi-modal
Transport of dangerous goods/hazardous materials by all modes (air, ocean, highway and rail) Multi-modal seminars cover IATA, IMDG and 49 CFR
multi-modal
Logistics that use at least two modes of transport Also known as Intermodal
Türkisch - Englisch
(Tıp) modal
modal analiz
modal analysis
modal algı
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) modal perception
modal eylem yapısı
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) modal action pattern
modal puan
(Pisikoloji, Ruhbilim) modal score
modal

    Silbentrennung

    mod·al

    Türkische aussprache

    mōdıl

    Aussprache

    /ˈmōdəl/ /ˈmoʊdəl/

    Etymologie

    [ 'mO-d&l ] (adjective.) 1569. From Medieval Latin modalis (“pertaining to a mode”) Latin modus (“mode”); see mode. Compare to French, Spanish and Portuguese modal and Italian modale.

    Gemeinsame Collocations

    modal verb

    Wort des Tages

    redolent
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