lurch

listen to the pronunciation of lurch
Englisch - Englisch
To make such a sudden, unsteady movement
A sudden or unsteady movement

Yet I hoped by grouting at the earth below it to be able to dislodge the stone at the side; but while I was considering how best to begin, the candle flickered, the wick gave a sudden lurch to one side, and I was left in darkness.

{n} a forlorn condition, a helpless state, a sudden motion towards one side
{v} to lurk, cheat, pilfer, devour, defeat
disapproval If you say that a person or organization lurches from one thing to another, you mean they move suddenly from one course of action or attitude to another in an uncontrolled way. The state government has lurched from one budget crisis to another The first round of multilateral trade talks has lurched between hope and despair. Lurch is also a noun. The property sector was another casualty of the lurch towards higher interest rates
Fig
A sudden roll of a ship to one side, as in heavy weather; hence, a swaying or staggering movement to one side, as that by a drunken man
the act of moving forward suddenly
move slowly and unsteadily; "The truck lurched down the road
defeat by a lurch
an unsteady uneven gait the act of moving forward suddenly abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
move slowly and unsteadily; "The truck lurched down the road"
To roll or sway suddenly to one side, as a ship or a drunken man
an unsteady uneven gait
To swallow or eat greedily; to devour; hence, to swallow up
a decisive defeat in a game (especially in cribbage)
Make such a movement; stagger
To lurch means to make a sudden movement, especially forwards, in an uncontrolled way. As the car sped over a pothole she lurched forward Henry looked, stared, and lurched to his feet Lurch is also a noun. The car took a lurch forward but grounded in a deep rut
loiter about, with no apparent aim
To steal; to rob
a decisive defeat in a game (especially in cribbage) defeat by a lurch move abruptly; "The ship suddenly lurched to the left"
walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room"
To leave in the lurch; to cheat
{f} stagger, sway, move unsteadily; make a sudden sideways movement, abruptly roll or pitch to one side
A double score in cribbage for the winner when his adversary has been left in the lurch
An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables
To withdraw to one side, or to a private place; to lurk
If someone leaves you in the lurch, they go away or stop helping you at a very difficult time. You wouldn't leave an old friend in the lurch, surely?. In a difficult or embarrassing position
move abruptly; "The ship suddenly lurched to the left"
A sudden and capricious inclination of the mind
{i} staggering, swaying, unsteady motion; sudden sideways movement, abrupt rolling or pitching to one side; defeat in which the winner's score is much greater than the loser's (especially in cribbage)
To dodge; to shift; to play tricks
leave someone in the lurch
To abandon somebody; especially, to abandon somebody and leave him or her in a difficult situation

He left me in the lurch and I had to finish the whole project by myself.

lurching
Present participle of lurch
lurching
the action of the verb to lurch
in the lurch
in a difficult or vulnerable position; "he resigned and left me in the lurch
lurched
past of lurch
lurches
plural of lurch
lurches
third-person singular of lurch
lurching
walking unsteadily; "a stqaggering gait"
lurching
walking unsteadily; "a stqaggering gait
lurch
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