filibuster

listen to the pronunciation of filibuster
Englisch - Türkisch
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ağırdan almak
işi uzatmak
haydutluk etmek
(parlamento/vb.'de) işi uzatmak
{f} haydutluk et
haydutluk
{i} parlamentoyu engelleme
haydutluk/haydut
(fiil) parlamentoyu engellemek
{i} korsan
haydutluk yap/oyala
{f} parlamentoyu engellemek
{i} haydut
böyle bir engelleme
Englisch - Englisch
To take part in a private military action in a foreign country
A delaying tactic, especially the use of long, often irrelevant speeches given in order to delay progress or the making of a decision, especially on the floor of the US Senate

Then, last month, before the survey was finished and for reasons still unclear, the Democrats abruptly tried to attach a repeal of the law to the defence appropriations bill, a stratagem the Republicans defeated in a filibuster.

A freebooter, or mercenary soldier
A member of a legislative body causing such obstruction
To use obstructionist tactics in a legislative body

But as the case had dragged on interminably, and he believed, and the world believed, and the Canadians themselves knew, that they intended to filibuster and postpone as long as possible, he took the common-sense way to a settlement.

one who attempts to obstruct legislation
A filibuster is a type of parliamentary procedure where an individual extends debate, allowing a lone member to delay or entirely prevent a vote on a given proposal. It is sometimes referred to as talking out a bill, and characterized as a form of obstruction in a legislature or other decision-making body
An attempt by senators to prevent a vote by continuous speech-making In the House, debate is limited In the Senate, senators can speak as long as they wish A filibuster can be stopped only by a successful cloture vote
A delaying tactic of unlimited debate, used only in the Senate
obstruct deliberately by delaying; of legislation
A delay tactic used during debate by opponents of a bill who seek to prevent the measure from coming up before members for a vote; most often achieved by maintaining control of the debate and not allowing other members the opportunity to speak
If a politician filibusters, he or she makes a long slow speech in order to use up time so that a vote cannot be taken and a law cannot be passed. They simply threatened to filibuster until the Senate adjourns A group of senators plans to filibuster a measure that would permit drilling in Alaska. to try to delay action in Congress or another law-making group by making very long speeches (filibustero ). Tactic of delaying action on a bill by talking long enough to wear down the majority in order to win concessions or force withdrawal of the bill. The tactic is normally employed by a group that cannot muster enough votes to defeat a bill by vote. Filibustering is possible in the U.S. Senate because Senate rules allow unlimited debate on a bill. A filibuster may be carried out by a group or a single member, and the speech need not be related to the bill under discussion. Calling for a vote to limit debate (cloture) which requires 60 votes, the votes of three-fifths of the entire membership, in the U.S. Senate or holding around-the-clock sessions to tire the speakers are measures used to defeat filibusters
a legislator who gives long speeches in an effort to delay or obstruct legislation that he (or she) opposes
A large hard biscuit, recommended by dentists
{i} use of delaying tactics; long speech made to delay or prevent a decision from being made (Politics); military adventurer who engages in unauthorized revolutionary activities in foreign countries
     A lengthy speech given by a member of the US Senate that impedes the introduction of a controversial matter by stalling until time runs out
means the use of obstructive tactics, such as making prolonged speeches or using irrelevant material, in order to delay legislative action
{f} give long speeches in order to delay or prevent a decision from being made; intentionally delay debate; lead a filibuster; engage in unauthorized revolutionary activities in foreign countries
a tactic for delaying or obstructing legislation by making long speeches
A deliberate obstruction of the legislative process by making a long speech
a tactic for delaying or obstructing legislation by making long speeches a legislator who gives long speeches in an effort to delay or obstruct legislation that he (or she) opposes obstruct deliberately by delaying; of legislation
Long-continued speechmaking by a member, or members, of a legislative body, or other delaying tactics deliberately intended to compel the majority to abandon part of its legislative program
a tactic used to delay or stop a vote on a bill by making long floor speeches and debates
To act as a filibuster, or military freebooter
A time-delaying tactic in which a minority party Senator controls the floor and extends the debate of a measure in an effort to delay, modify or defeat a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly The stricter rules of the House make filibusters more difficult, but delaying tactics are employed occasionally through various procedural devices allowed by House rules
A time-delaying tactic associated with the Senate and used by a minority in an effort to prevent a vote on a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly The most common method is to take advantage of the Senate's rules permitting unlimited debate, but other forms of parliamentary maneuvering may be used The stricter rules used by the House make filibusters more difficult, but delaying tactics are employed occasionally through various procedural devices allowed by House rules
A filibuster is a long slow speech made to use up time so that a vote cannot be taken and a law cannot be passed. Senator Seymour has threatened a filibuster to block the bill
To delay legislation, by dilatory motions or other artifices
—Delaying tactic associated with the Senate and used by the Minority in an effort to prevent the passage of a bill or amendment Usually threatened but not executed The House cannot filibuster as all debate is governed by rigid rules crafted by the Rules Committee setting the parameters for discussion and approved by the entire body for each separate piece of legislation The Senate does not employ a rulemaking process
A lawless military adventurer, especially one in quest of plunder; a freebooter; originally applied to buccaneers infesting the Spanish American coasts, but introduced into common English to designate the followers of Lopez in his expedition to Cuba in 1851, and those of Walker in his expedition to Nicaragua, in 1855
the use of long speeches or other tactics in Parliament to delay deliberately a vote or decision
A time-delaying tactic associated with the Senate and used by a minority in an effort to delay, modify or defeat a bill or amendment that probably would pass if voted on directly The most common method is to take advantage of the Senate's rules permitting unlimited debate
Delaying tactics to prevent action on a bill In the Senate, which has a tradition of "extended" debate, a member may filibuster by speaking con tinuously (reading from the telephone directory, if it is so desired) But a member also retains the floor while yielding to a colleague for a question or by calling for the presence of a quorum (which necessitates a roll call) If the Senate recesses, a member regains the floor when the Senate reconvenes In the House, filibustering is more difficult because members are ordinarily prohibited from speaking more than one hour and most legislation is considered while the House is in Committee of the Whole, which restricts the kinds of motions which may be offered
A device, used only in the Senate, to delay or prevent a vote by time-consuming talk It can be stopped only by a 60-member vote of the senators present and voting
Holding up legislation or other business in the U S Senate by organizing continuous speeches in opposition so that no vote can be taken It requires 60 Senators to vote to end a filibuster Minority groups, to offset their numerical disadvantage, often use filibusters This site not only gives a short history of the filibuster but also explains the tactic used to shorten a filibuster, which is known as a "Cloture " President Woodrow Wilson was the first person to make changes to stop unlimited debate: http: //www senate gov/learning/brief_13 html
A tactic used by members of the Senate to prevent action on legislation they oppose by continuously holding the floor and speaking until the majority backs down Once given the floor, Senators have unlimited time to speak, and it requires a cloture vote of three-fifths of the Senate to end the filibuster
An attempt to defeat a bill (proposed law), especially in the Senate, by talking at length, which prevents further discussion of or voting on a bill For example, when a group in the Senate is against passing a bill which they do not have enough votes to defeat, they use the filibuster to keep the bill from coming to a vote
Delaying tactics, especially long, often irrelevant speeches given in order to delay progress or the making of a decision, especially on the floor of the US Senate
A procedural tactic in the U S Senate whereby a minority of legislators prevent a bill from coming to a vote by holding the floor and talking until the majority gives in and the bill is withdrawn from consideration
filibustered
past of filibuster
filibusterer
A person who filibusters
filibusterer
{i} person that makes long speeches in order to delay or prevent a decision from being made; person who intentionally delays debate; person who leads a filibuster
filibustering
present participle of filibuster
filibusters
third-person singular of filibuster
filibusters
plural of , filibuster
filibuster
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