fanny

listen to the pronunciation of fanny
Englisch - Türkisch
but
kaba et
{i} kıç
{i} am [brit.]
vulva/kıç
dili but
{i} göt
{i} kuku
i., k.dili. kıç, popo
(Argo) vajina
am
sweet fanny
hiçbir şey
Englisch - Englisch
A diminutive of Frances, also used as a female given name

My name is Frances. Don't call me Fanny! Why not? Because it's too absurd to be endured! What does the mere sound of Fanny suggest? A flirting dancing creature - plump and fair, and playful and pretty!.

sex (similar to north american pussy)

this club is full of fanny.

Mess kettle or cooking pot
The female genitalia

Her dress was so short you could nearly see her fanny.

The buttocks, as possibly the most harmless euphemism

Get off your fanny and get back to work!.

diminutive of the female given name Frances
external female sex organs; "in England `fanny' is vulgar slang for female genitals"
the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on; "he deserves a good kick in the butt"; "are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?"
{i} buttocks, backside (Slang); vagina (British offensive slang)
Someone's fanny is their bottom
A woman's fanny is her genitals. Brice Fanny Burney d'Arblay Fanny Cerrito Fanny Elssler Fanny Fanny Wright
Fanny Adams
Nothing (sanitized version of fuck all)
fanny about
To wander about or prowl around

Out of all the random cities one gets to fanny about in Europe, all my flings are descending onto Luxembourg like a plague of horny man-teens.

fanny about
To waste time or fool around; to engage in activity which produces little or no accomplishment

Johnson waited for an age while the barmen tossed bottles back and forth, poured luminous liquids into glasses from great heights, and fannied about with fruit and frivolities.

fanny around
Alternative form of fanny about
fanny fart
A noise made by the emission of air from the vagina, usually associated with a physical activity such as horse riding or intercourse
fanny fart
A (normal) fart
fanny magnet
A man or thing that is believed to attract females
fanny pack
A small fabric pouch secured with a zipper and worn at the waist by a strap around the hips

She wears her fanny pack every day on her morning jog around Central Park.

fanny packs
plural form of fanny pack
Fanny Brice
orig. Fannie Borach born Oct. 29, 1891, New York, N.Y., U.S. died May 29, 1951, Los Angeles, Calif. U.S. comedian and singer. She played in vaudeville and burlesque shows, where the producer Florenz Ziegfeld discovered her in 1910. She became a headliner in his Follies with her musical numbers and comedy routines, including satiric sketches of ballet dancers and fan dancers as well as affecting torch songs such as "My Man." The character of Baby Snooks, an incorrigible little girl, which she created to amuse her friends, became a Follies favourite, and in that character Brice was featured on radio from 1936 until her death. The Broadway musical Funny Girl (1964; film, 1968) was based on her life
Fanny Burney
orig. Frances Burney born June 13, 1752, King's Lynn, Norfolk, Eng. died Jan. 6, 1840, London English novelist. The self-educated daughter of Charles Burney, she wrote lively accounts of his social musical evenings. Her habit of recording observations of society led to Evelina (1778), an epistolary novel about an unsure young girl's social development; a landmark in the evolution of the novel of manners, it pointed the way to Jane Austen's novels. Her later novels include Cecilia (1782) and the potboiler Camilla (1796)
Fanny Burney d'Arblay
orig. Frances Burney born June 13, 1752, King's Lynn, Norfolk, Eng. died Jan. 6, 1840, London English novelist. The self-educated daughter of Charles Burney, she wrote lively accounts of his social musical evenings. Her habit of recording observations of society led to Evelina (1778), an epistolary novel about an unsure young girl's social development; a landmark in the evolution of the novel of manners, it pointed the way to Jane Austen's novels. Her later novels include Cecilia (1782) and the potboiler Camilla (1796)
Fanny Cerrito
orig. Francesca Teresa Giuseppa Raffaela Cerrito born May 11, 1817, Naples, Italy died May 6, 1909, Paris, Fr. Italian ballerina and choreographer. She made her debut in Naples (1832) and gained international fame in London (1840-48). She was known for the brilliance, strength, and vivacity of her dancing. Her greatest role was in Ondine (1843), created for her by Jules Perrot. Cerrito married her regular partner, Arthur Saint-Léon, in 1845. In 1854 she both choreographed and danced in Gemma at the Paris Opera. She retired in 1857. She was one of the few women in the 19th century to achieve distinction as a choreographer
Fanny Elssler
born June 23, 1810, Vienna, Austria died Nov. 27, 1884, Vienna Austrian ballerina. She studied in Vienna and toured in Europe before making her Paris Opéra debut in 1834. Her warm, spirited style, contrasting with the cool, academic style of the then-reigning Marie Taglioni, made her an immediate success. She introduced theatricalized folk dance (character dance) into ballet. During 1840-42 Elssler toured the U.S., earning wild adulation. She returned to Europe and toured until her retirement to Vienna in 1851
Fanny Hill
a book written in 1749 by John Cleland about the sexual adventures of a young woman, Fanny Hill. It is written in a very elegant style but has many sex scenes
fanny adams
nautical term for tinned meat
fanny pack
a waist pack worn with the pouch in back
fanny pack
A waist pack, especially as worn with the pouch over the buttocks
fanny pack
{i} small pouch that is fastened around the waist with a belt-like strap
fannies
plural of fanny
fanny
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