encumbering

listen to the pronunciation of encumbering
Englisch - Englisch
present participle of encumber
encumber
to restrict or block something with a hindrance or impediment
encumber
to impede with obstacles
encumber
To burden a parcel of land with a lien or charge, e g , a mortgage
encumber
{f} burden, weigh down, hamper, hinder, impede (also incumber)
encumber
To burden a parcel of land with a lien or charge such as a mortgage
encumber
To impede the motion or action of, as with a burden; to retard with something superfluous; to weigh down; to obstruct or embarrass; as, his movements were encumbered by his mantle; his mind is encumbered with useless learning
encumber
When we agree to pay for something, perhaps by ordering merchandise or accepting a bid, we mark the money we've promised to pay so it's not spent elsewhere This is called encumbering funds Funds you have encumbered are not yet spent, so they are tracked in a separate column in your accounting reports Banner also calls them commitments
encumber
to add a legal claim or other obligation
encumber
hold back
encumber
a bookkeeping procedure that commits a given amount of money to the payment of an order; each time an order is placed, an amount of money (the encumbrance) equal to the total price of the order is deducted from the free balance
encumber
To load with debts, or other legal claims; as, to encumber an estate with mortgages
encumber
If you are encumbered by something, it prevents you from moving freely or doing what you want. Lead weights and air cylinders encumbered the divers as they walked to the shore It is still labouring under the debt burden that it was encumbered with in the 1980s. = burden + encumbered en·cum·bered The rest of the world is less encumbered with legislation. to make it difficult for you to do something or for something to happen = burden (encombrer, from combre )
encumber
To burden a parcel of land with a lien or charge such as a mortgage or deed of trust
encumber
to load down something with a burden
encumbering

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    [ in-'k&m-b&r ] (transitive verb.) 14th century. Middle English encombren, from Middle French encombrer, from Old French, from en- + Old French combre dam, weir.

    Wort des Tages

    concomitant
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