bunkum

listen to the pronunciation of bunkum
Englisch - Türkisch
martaval
tavşan
tavşancık
boş laf
{i} boş lâf
{i} zırva
{i} saçma
{i} palavra
nonsense
{i} saçmalık

Dediğin şey tamamen saçmalıktır. - What you said is absolute nonsense.

Saçmalıklarından bıktım. - I am fed up with your nonsense.

nonsense
anlamsız

Tom anlamsız konuşuyordu. - Tom was talking nonsense.

Ona uğraşmak anlamsız. - It's nonsense to try that.

nonsense
{i} saçma

O çok saçma. Bir aptalın dışında ona kimse inanmaz. - That's nonsense. Nobody but a fool would believe it.

Bu saçmalığın dik alası. - That's absolute nonsense!

buncombe, bunkum
buncombe, palavra
nonsense
abuk sabuk
nonsense
(isim) saçma, saçmalık, safsata, zırva, fasa fiso
nonsense
boş laf
nonsense
kuru gürültü
nonsense
havagazı
nonsense
manasız
buncombe
boş laf
nonsense
aptalca davranış
nonsense
fasafiso
nonsense
anlamsız söz
nonsense
abes
nonsense
{i} zırva
nonsense
{i} fasa fiso
nonsense
ipe sapa gelmez
nonsense
saçma sapan

Onu dinleme, o saçma sapan konuşuyor. - Don't listen to him, he's talking nonsense.

O saçma sapan konuşuyordu. - He was talking nonsense.

Englisch - Englisch
any bombastic political posturing or an oratorical display not accompanied by conviction; speechmaking designed for show or public applause
senseless talk; nonsense; a piece of nonsense (countable)
{i} nonsense
senseless talk; nonsense
disapproval If you say that something that has been said or written is bunkum, you mean that you think it is completely untrue or very stupid. = balderdash. bunk (Buncombe county in North Carolina, whose congressman in 1820 made a long pointless speech to impress the voters there)
unacceptable behavior (especially ludicrously false statements)
Speech-making for the gratification of constituents, or to gain public applause; flattering talk for a selfish purpose; anything said for mere show
buncombe
{i} nonsense; speech-making intended for the mass media
buncombe
alternative spelling of bunkum
buncombe
Speech-making for the gratification of constituents, or to gain public applause; flattering talk for a selfish purpose; anything said for mere show
bunkum

    Silbentrennung

    bun·kum

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    (noun.) 1845. 1830s, from buncombe, from “speaking to Buncombe” (or “for Buncombe”) from Buncombe County, North Carolina|Buncombe County, North Carolina]], named for Edward Buncombe|Edward Buncombe]]. In 1820, Felix Walker, who represented Buncombe County, North Carolina, in the U.S. House of Representatives, rose to address the question of admitting Missouri as a free or slave state. This was his first attempt to speak on this subject after nearly a month of solid debate and right before the vote was to be called. Allegedly, to the exasperation of his colleagues, Walker insisted on delivering a long and wearisome "speech for Buncombe.", Houghton Mifflin, Boston, accessed 2009-01-11 He was shouted down by his colleagues. His persistent effort made "buncombe" (later respelled "bunkum") a synonym for meaningless political claptrap and later for any kind of nonsense., Houghton Mifflin, Boston, accessed 2009-01-11 Although he was unable to make the speech in front of Congress it was still published in a Washington newspaper.Missouri Question: Speech of Mr. Walker, of N.C. The term became a joke and metaphor in Washington, then entered common usage; see discussion on talk page. : Our readers have, perhaps, often heard of ‘speaking to Buncombe,’ by which phrase is signified a speech not intended or expected to have any influence on those to whom it is addressed, but designed for the speaker’s constituents. It originated with a representative from North Carolina, who came from the county of Buncombe, and who being asked, one day, why he continued to speak to empty benches, ‘O!’ he replied, ‘I am speaking to Buncombe.’ :: Portsmouth Journal of Literature and Politics, 1838–12–15

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