copula

listen to the pronunciation of copula
İngilizce - Türkçe
koşaç
bildirme eki
haber edatı
rabıta türünden kısa pasaj
ingilizcede özne ve tümleci birleştiren be fiili
bağlayıcı fiil
(Tıp) Cinsel birleşim, kopulasyon
{i} birleştirici yapı
(Tıp) Birleştirici oluşum, iki şey arasındaki bağlantı
{i} bağ
(Anatomi) band, ip
(Diş Hekimliği) 1. Embriyoda ikinci brankiyal arkların ilerde dil kökünü oluşturmak üzere biraraya gelmesi ile oluşan dil yükseltisi. 2. Birleştirici herhangi bir yapı
önermenin öznesi ile fiili arasındaki bağlantı
rabıta
İngilizce - İngilizce
A function that represents the association between two or more variables, independent of the individual marginal distributions of the variables
A device that connects two or more keyboards of an organ
A word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (usually a subject complement or an adverbial); it serves to unite (or associate) the subject with the predicate. (e.g. be)
A measure of association between two or more variables, independent of the individual marginal distributions of the variables
The stop which connects the manuals, or the manuals with the pedals; called also coupler
  One of the parts of speech, signifying an assignment of a value to a name   The copulas are = and =
The word which unites the subject and predicate
A copula is the same as a linking verb. a type of verb that connects the subject of a sentence to its complement, for example 'seem' in the sentence 'The house seems big' = linking verb
a verb that connects a subject with a subject complement Most common copulative verbs in PDE are be, become, seem, appear, remain, and the verbs of sensation see, smell, feel, sound, and taste Copulas are also called linking verbs
A word used to link the subject of a sentence with a predicate (usually a subject complement or an adverbial); it serves to equate (or associate) the subject with the predicate. (e.g. be)
{i} word that links a subject with its predicate (Grammar); connecting part (bone, ligament)
a copulative word See also: copulative
an equating verb (such as `be' or `become') that links the subject with the complement of a sentence
The word that unites the subject and the predicate of a sentence
zero copula
Our Living Language A widely known feature of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) and some varieties of Southern American English spoken by working-class white people is the absence of a form of be in situations where Standard English would normally require one. In these varieties of English, one can say He working, where Standard English has He is working, meaning "He is working right now." Linguists frequently describe this zero usage as zero copula, although strictly speaking it should be described as zero auxiliary before progressive verb forms, as in He working, and before going to or gon(na), as in He gon do it. This usage is perhaps even more characteristic of AAVE than is invariant habitual be. For some AAVE speakers, zero copula occurs 80 to 90 percent of the time where Standard English requires is or are. No other varieties of American English use zero copula as often.·As with all dialectal features, zero copula use is more systematic than it might at first appear. As the examples above indicate, only present tense inflected forms of be can be deleted (was and were cannot be deleted), and even among present forms, only is and are are deleted; am is frequently contracted but never deleted. Invariant or non-finite forms, such as be in You have to be good can't be deleted, nor can forms that are stressed (He is tall) or that come at the end of a clause (That's what he is). In the late 1960s, linguist William Labov captured most of these generalizations, stating that wherever Standard English can contract is or are, AAVE can delete it. (Note that Standard English does not tolerate contractions in sentences such as That's what he's.) Equally systematic are the quantitative regularities of the zero copula. Throughout the United States, zero copula is less frequent when followed by a noun (He a man) than when followed by an adjective (He happy). It is most frequent when followed by progressives and gon(na), as exemplified above.·This pattern of be-deletion is also found in Gullah and Caribbean Creole varieties of English. Since zero copula is not a feature of the British dialects of English that colonial settlers brought to the United States, it is one of the strongest indicators that the development of AAVE may have been influenced by Caribbean English creoles or that AAVE itself may have evolved from an American Creole-like ancestor. See note at be
copula