theorem

listen to the pronunciation of theorem
İngilizce - Türkçe
teorem

Pisagor teoremi bir dik üçgenin hipotenüs uzunluğunu hesaplaman için izin verir. - Pythagoras' theorem allows you to calculate the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle.

Fermat'ın Son Teoremi, nihayet 1994 yılında İngiliz matematikçi Andrew Vaylzom tarafından kanıtlandı. - Fermat's Last Theorem was finally proven by English mathematician Andrew Wiles in 1994.

sav
önerme

Şimdi, bu yardımcı önermenin nasıl ana önermemizi kanıtlamak için kullanılabileceğini gösteriyoruz. - Now, we show how this lemma can be used to prove our main theorem.

kanıt

Fermat'ın Son Teoremi, nihayet 1994 yılında İngiliz matematikçi Andrew Vaylzom tarafından kanıtlandı. - Fermat's Last Theorem was finally proven by English mathematician Andrew Wiles in 1994.

Şimdi, bu yardımcı önermenin nasıl ana önermemizi kanıtlamak için kullanılabileceğini gösteriyoruz. - Now, we show how this lemma can be used to prove our main theorem.

i., mat., man. teorem, kanıtsav
{i} kuram
kanıtsav
theorem of the cosine
kosinüs teoremi
intermediate value theorem
ara değer teoremi
central limit theorem
merkezi sınır teoremi
existence theorem
varlık savı
existence theorem
(Matematik) varlık teoremi
remainder theorem
(Matematik) kalan teoremi
uniqueness theorem
teklik savı
angle bisector theorem
açıortay teoremi
bernoulli's theorem
bernuulli önermesi
binomial theorem
binomial teoremi
cantor theorem
cantor teoremi
cauchy mean value theorem
cauchy ortalama değer teoremi
central limit theorem
merkezi kısıtlama teoremi
mean value theorem
ortalama değer teoremi
Coase theorem
Ronald Coase tarafından 1960 yılında geliştirilen ve Coase Teoremi olarak bilinen teoreme göre, dışsal ekonomilerde mülkiyet hakları tesis edilirse mübadele maliyetinin sıfır olması koşuluyla taraflardan biri diğerinin zararını karşılayarak sosyal optimuma ulaşılır ve ekonomik etkinlik sağlanır. Mülkiyet hakkının hangi tarafa tahsis edildiği ekonomik etkinlik açısından önem taşımamakta, ancak faydanın taraflar arasındaki dağılımını etkilemektedir
Pascal's theorem
Pascal teoremi, Pascal savı
cobweb theorem
örümcek ağı teoremı
pinching theorem
Sıkıştırma teoremi
pythagorean theorem
pisagor teoremi
pythagorean theorem
pisagor savı
pythagorean theorem
pitagor teoremi
remainder theorem
kalan teoremi, kalan savı
residue theorem
artık teoremi, artık savı
sandwich theorem
Sıkıştırma teoremi
squeeze theorem
Sıkıştırma teoremi
bernoulli theorem
bernulli varsayımı
bernoulli’s theorem
(Askeri) bernouilli teoremi
chinese remainder theorem
(Matematik) çinli kalan teoremi
cobweb theorem
örümcek ağı teoremi
existence theorem
varlik savi
fourier's integral theorem
(Matematik) fourier integral teoremi
fourier's integral theorem
(Matematik) fourier tümlev savı
nested intervals theorem
(Matematik) iç içe aralıklar savı
nested intervals theorem
(Matematik) iç içe aralıklar teoremi
rational root theorem
(Matematik) rasyonel kök teoremi
residue theorem
(Matematik) artık teoremi
residue theorem
(Matematik) artık savı
rolle's theorem
(Matematik) rolle teoremi
rolle's theorem
(Matematik) rolle savı
rouche's theorem
(Matematik) rouche teoremi
rouche's theorem
(Matematik) rouche savı
stokes' theorem
stokes teoremi
uniqueness theorem
teklik savi
İngilizce - İngilizce
A mathematical statement of some importance that has been proven to be true. Minor theorems are often called propositions. Theorems which are not very interesting in themselves but are an essential part of a bigger theorem's proof are called lemmas
a syntactically correct expression that is deducible from the given axioms of a deductive system
A mathematical statement that is expected to be true; as, Fermat's Last Theorem (as which it was known long before it was proved in the 1990s.)
{n} a position of acknowledged truth
A specific implication of a more general explanatory proposition, a postulate by means by deductive logic
A theorem is a statement in mathematics or logic that can be proved to be true by reasoning. a statement, especially in mathematics, that you can prove by showing that it has been correctly developed from facts (theorema, from , from theorein; THEORY). In mathematics or logic, a statement whose validity has been established or proved. It consists of a hypothesis and a conclusion, beginning with certain assumptions that are necessary and sufficient to establish a result. A system of theorems that build on and augment each other constitutes a theory. Within any theory, however, only statements that are essential, important, or of special interest are called theorems. Less important statements, usually stepping-stones in proofs of more important results, are called lemmas. A statement proved as a direct consequence of a theorem is a corollary of the theorem. Some theorems (and even lemmas and corollaries) are singled out and given titles (e.g., Gödel's theorem, fundamental theorem of algebra, fundamental theorem of calculus, Pythagorean theorem). Bernoulli's theorem binomial theorem central limit theorem Fermat's last theorem fundamental theorem of algebra fundamental theorem of arithmetic fundamental theorem of calculus Gödel's theorem Pythagorean theorem Rolle's theorem mean value theorems
A mathematical statement of some importance that has been proven to be true. Minor theorems are often called propositions. Theorems which are not very interesting in themselves but are an essential part of a bigger theorems proof are called lemmas
Let n be an integer greater than one Let m be the product of all of the positive integers less than n, but relatively prime to n (so m=(n-1)! if n is prime) n divides either m+1 or m-1
That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule
A statement that can be proved
A formula, proposition, or statement in mathematics or logic deduced or to be deduced from other formulas or propositions
a proposition deducible from basic postulates
painting [n] a type of painting, usually a still life, that was painted according to a list of instructions and sometimes with stencils; popular in the mid-nineteenth century
an idea accepted as a demonstrable truth
A formula, proposition, or statement in mathematics or logic deduced or to be deduced from other formulas or propositions (A theorem is the last step, after other statements have been proved )
an idea accepted as a demonstrable truth a proposition deducible from basic postulates
{i} theoretical propositions which is to be proven (Mathematics); rule, law, basic premise; generally accepted rule
A statement of a principle to be demonstrated
A statement that can be proved (Lesson 15 1)
A theorem is a statement that has been proven to be true
a logical proposition that follows from basic definitions and assumptions
A consequence of a theory or mathematical system which is sufficiently useful to warrant special notice
To formulate into a theorem
A mathematical statement that is expected to be true; as, Fermats Last Theorem (as which it was known long before it was proved in the 1990s.)
a string derived from an axiom in a formal system Hofstadter considers this definition different from that ofa Theorem A Theorem is a statement that has been proven true through logic and which considered true Hofstadter uses his own idea of theorems in his proofs
Thurston's geometrization theorem
(Geometri) In geometry, Thurston's geometrization theorem or hyperbolization theorem implies that closed atoroidal Haken manifolds are hyperbolic, and in particular satisfy the Thurston conjecture
Bertrand-Chebyshev theorem
the theorem that there is at least one prime number between n and 2n for every n>1, i.e.:

\forall n\in\mathbb{N}:n>1\Rightarrow\exists p\in\mathbb{P}:n.

Cantor-Bendixson theorem
A theorem which states that a closed set in a Polish space is the disjoint union of a countable set and a perfect set

From the Cantor-Bendixson theorem it can be deduced that an uncountable set in \mathbb{R} must have an uncountable number of limit points.

Chebyshev's theorem
the theorem that the prime counting function is of the same order of magnitude as x / ln x, i.e., for the prime counting function π, there are positive constants c and C such that:

\forall x\in\mathbb{N}:.

Chebyshev's theorem
an alternative name for Chebyshev's inequality
Chebyshev's theorem
an alternative name for Bertrand's postulate, as proven by Chebyshev
Goodstein's theorem
A theorem stating that every Goodstein sequence eventually terminates at zero
Green's theorem
Letting \vec G = (P, Q) be a vector field, and d\vec l = (dx, dy) this can be restated as

with the earlier formula resembling Stoke's theorem, and the latter resembling the divergence theorem.

Green's theorem
A generalization of the fundamental theorem of calculus to the two-dimensional plane, which states that given two scalar fields P and Q and a simply connected region R, the area integral of derivatives of the fields equals the line integral of the fields, or

\iint_R \left( {\partial Q \over \partial x} - {\partial P \over \partial y}\right) dx \, dy = \oint_{\partial R} P\, dx + Q\, dy .

Gödel's incompleteness theorem
A theorem in mathematical logic that states that no consistent system can be used to prove its own consistency
Noether's theorem
A theorem, proven by Emmy Noether in 1915 and published in 1918, stating that any differentiable symmetry of the action of a physical system has a corresponding conservation law
Pythagorean theorem
A mathematical theorem which states that the square of the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of those of the two other sides
Pythagorean theorem
A generalization of the Pythagorean theorem (1) to Hilbert spaces
Vitali-Carathéodory theorem
A theorem which states that any real-valued Lebesgue integrable function can be approached arbitrarily closely from below by an upper semicontinuous function and also from above by a lower semicontinuous function
binomial theorem
A formula giving the expansion of a binomial such as ( a + b ) raised to any positive integer power, i.e. ( a + b )^{n} . It's possible to expand the power into a sum of terms of the form ax^{b}y^{c} where the coefficient of each term is a positive integer. For example:

x+y ^4 \;=\; x^4 \,+\, 4 x^3y \,+\, 6 x^2 y^2 \,+\, 4 x y^3 \,+\, y^4.

central limit theorem
The theorem that states that if the sum of independent identically distributed random variables has a finite variance, then it will be approximately normally distributed
central limit theorem
Any of various similar theorems
hairy ball theorem
Given a sphere covered in fur, one cannot brush all the hairs flat without creating at least two whirls
hairy ball theorem
There is no nonvanishing continuous tangent vector field on the sphere
infinite monkey theorem
The proposition that a monkey, hitting typewriter keys at random will produce a large amount of sensible text (typically a work by Shakespeare) given an infinite amount of time
intermediate value theorem
a statement that claims that for each value between the least upper bound and greatest lower bound of the image of a continuous function there is a corresponding point in its domain that the function maps to that value
mean value theorem
a statement that claims that given an arc of a differentiable curve, there is at least one point on that arc at which the derivative of the curve is equal to the average derivative of the arc
scallop theorem
A theorem which states that to achieve propulsion at low Reynolds number in simple (i.e. Newtonian) fluids, a swimmer must deform in a way that is not invariant under time-reversal
virial theorem
A theorem in mechanics showing the relationship between the kinetic energy of a system to the virial of Clausius
hyperbolization theorem
(Geometri) In geometry, Thurston's geometrization theorem or hyperbolization theorem implies that closed atoroidal Haken manifolds are hyperbolic, and in particular satisfy the Thurston conjecture
pinching theorem
In calculus, the squeeze theorem (also known as the pinching theorem or the sandwich theorem, sometimes the squeeze lemma) is a theorem regarding the limit of a function. The theorem asserts that if two functions approach the same limit at a point, and if a third function is "squeezed" ("pinched", "sandwiched") between those functions, then the third function also approaches that limit at that point
sandwich theorem
In calculus, the squeeze theorem (also known as the pinching theorem or the sandwich theorem, sometimes the squeeze lemma) is a theorem regarding the limit of a function. The theorem asserts that if two functions approach the same limit at a point, and if a third function is "squeezed" ("pinched", "sandwiched") between those functions, then the third function also approaches that limit at that point
squeeze theorem
In calculus, the squeeze theorem (also known as the pinching theorem or the sandwich theorem, sometimes the squeeze lemma) is a theorem regarding the limit of a function. The theorem asserts that if two functions approach the same limit at a point, and if a third function is "squeezed" ("pinched", "sandwiched") between those functions, then the third function also approaches that limit at that point
Bayes' Theorem
(Ticaret) A formula that considers the conditional probability of the existence of a given event or variable as being caused by a second variable, and the probability of the occurrence of the second variable
Fermat's last theorem
Statement that there are no natural numbers x, y, and z such that x^n + y^n = z^n, in which n is a natural number greater than
Fermat's last theorem
About this, Pierre de Fermat wrote in 1637 in his copy of Diophantus's Arithmetica, "I have discovered a truly remarkable proof but this margin is too small to contain it." Although the theorem was subsequently shown to be true for many specific values of n, leading to important mathematical advances in the process, the difficulty of the problem soon convinced mathematicians that Fermat never had a valid proof. In 1995 the British mathematician Andrew Wiles (b. 1953) and his former student Richard Taylor (b. 1962) published a complete proof, finally solving one of the most famous of all mathematical problems
Gödel's theorem
Principle of the foundations of mathematics. One of the most important discoveries of 20th-century mathematics, it states the impossibility of defining a complete system of axioms that is also consistent (does not give rise to contradictions). Any formal system (e.g., a computer program or a set of mathematical rules and axioms) powerful enough to generate meaningful statements can generate statements that are true but that cannot be proven or derived within the system. As a consequence, mathematics cannot be placed on an entirely rigorous basis. Named for Kurt Godel, who published his proof in 1931, it immediately had consequences for philosophy (particularly logic) and other areas. Its ramifications continue to be debated
Jordan curve theorem
The theorem that states that every simple closed curve divides a plane into two parts and is the common boundary between them
Pythagorean theorem
mathematical theory developed by Pythagoras (Greek mathematician)
Pythagorean theorem
n. The theorem that the sum of the squares of the lengths of the sides of a right triangle is equal to the square of the length of the hypotenuse. Rule relating the lengths of the sides of a right triangle. It says that the sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs is equal to the square of the length of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle). That is, a^2 + b^2 = c^2, where c is the length of the hypotenuse. Triads of whole numbers that satisfy it (e.g., 3, 4, and 5) are called Pythagorean triples. See also law of cosines; law of sines
Rolle's theorem
A theorem stating that if a curve is continuous, has two x-intercepts, and has a tangent at every point between the intercepts, at least one of these tangents is parallel to the x-axis. Special case of the mean-value theorem of differential calculus. It states that if a continuous curve passes through the x-axis twice within a given interval and has a unique tangent line at every point of that interval, then somewhere between the two points of interception it has a tangent parallel to the x-axis
bayes' theorem
(statistics) a theorem describing how the conditional probability of a set of possible causes for a given observed event can be computed from knowledge of the probability of each cause and the conditional probability of the outcome of each cause
binomial theorem
The theorem that specifies the expansion of any power (a + b). In algebra, a formula for expansion of the binomial (x + y) raised to any positive integer power. A simple case is the expansion of (x + y)^2, which is x^2 + 2xy + y^2. In general, the expression (x + y)^n expands to the sum of (n + 1)terms in which the power of x decreases from n to 0 while the power of y increases from 0 to n in successive terms. The terms can be represented in factorial notation by the expression [n!/((n -r)!r!)]x^n -ry^r in which r takes on integer values from 0 to n
binomial theorem
a theorem giving the expansion of a binomial raised to a given power
binomial theorem
{i} mathematical formula that provides the expansion of a binomial raised to any power
binominal theorem
algebraic theorem developed by Sir Isaac Newton
central limit theorem
In statistics, any of several fundamental theorems in probability. Originally known as the law of errors, in its classic form it states that the sum of a set of independent random variables will approach a normal distribution regardless of the distribution of the individual variables themselves, given certain general conditions. Further, the mean (see mean, median, and mode) of the normal distribution will coincide with the (arithmetic) mean of the (statistical) means of each random variable
congruence theorem
formula which declares triangles to be exactly coinciding (Geometry)
fundamental theorem of algebra
Theorem of equations proved by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1799. It states that every polynomial equation of degree n with complex number coefficients has n roots, or solutions, in the complex numbers
fundamental theorem of arithmetic
Fundamental principle of number theory proved by Carl Friedrich Gauss in 1801. It states that any integer greater than 1 can be expressed as the product of prime numbers in only one way
fundamental theorem of calculus
Basic principle of calculus. It relates the derivative to the integral and provides the principal method for evaluating definite integrals (see differential calculus; integral calculus). In brief, it states that any function that is continuous (see continuity) over an interval has an antiderivative (a function whose rate of change, or derivative, equals the function) on that interval. Further, the definite integral of such a function over an interval a x b is the difference F(b) -F(a), where F is an antiderivative of the function. This particularly elegant theorem shows the inverse function relationship of the derivative and the integral and serves as the backbone of the physical sciences. It was articulated independently by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
multinomial theorem
The theorem that establishes the rule for forming the terms of the nth power of a sum of numbers in terms of products of powers of those numbers
theorems
plural of theorem
Türkçe - İngilizce

theorem teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

Coase theorem
In law and economics, the Coase theorem, attributed to Ronald Coase, describes the economic efficiency of an economic allocation or outcome in the presence of externalities. The theorem states that when trade in an externality is possible and there are no transaction costs, bargaining will lead to an efficient outcome regardless of the initial allocation of property rights. Obstacles to bargaining are often sufficient to prevent this efficient outcome, leaving normative Coase theorem to prevail over positive Coase theorem
theorem