lincoln

listen to the pronunciation of lincoln
İngilizce - Türkçe

lincoln teriminin İngilizce Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

lincoln green
parlak yeşil
law enforcement sensitive; leave and earnings statement; Lincoln Laboratories Ex
(Askeri) yasa koruma açısından hassas; miras ve kazanç beyanı; Lincoln Laboratuvarları Deney Uydusu
Türkçe - Türkçe

lincoln teriminin Türkçe Türkçe sözlükte anlamı

lincoln abbey
Yaşayan caz şarkıcıları arasında, en büyük iki isimden biri kabul edilen ABD'li şarkıcı, bestekar ve aktris
İngilizce - İngilizce
An English breed of sheep
The capital of Nebraska
An English surname
A county in many U.S. states
A placename, originally in Lincolnshire, England
A five-dollar bill

not only winning the hand, but also collecting a five dollar per player bonus. . Jonah yelled to Fred, who crumpled up a Lincoln and tossed it toward him.

A brand of American automobile
Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States during the Civil War
A male given name of American usage, originally in honor of Abraham Lincoln
A high altitude, long range bomber based on the Avro Lancaster
Pertaining to Abe Lincoln, as Lincoln Logs
{i} family name; male first name; Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), sixteenth president of the United States (1861-65); capital city of Nebraska (USA); town in Rhode Island (USA); city in Illinois (USA); town in Ontario (Canada); another name for Lincolnshire (county in England); city in Lincolnshire (England); United States car manufacturing company founded in 1917 known for providing limousines for the U.S. President; breed of sheep with long wool
American singer and actress who led a jazz group which included Sonny Rollins and Max Roach. In later years she became an advocate for racial equality. The 16th President of the United States (1861-1865), who led the Union during the Civil War and emancipated slaves in the South (1863). He was assassinated shortly after the end of the war by John Wilkes Booth. First Lady of the United States (1861-1865) as the wife of President Abraham Lincoln. Born in the South, she was criticized during the Civil War for allegedly having Confederate sympathies. A peak, 4,357.2 m (14,286 ft) high, in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado. It is the highest elevation of the Park Range. a type of large US car made by the Ford company. The Lincoln Continental is one of the best-known luxury cars in the US. City (pop., 2000: 225,581), capital of Nebraska, U.S. Laid out in 1859 and called Lancaster, it was renamed for Abraham Lincoln when it was chosen as the capital in 1867. The town was incorporated in 1869 and was the home of the politician William Jennings Bryan from 1887 to 1921. It is a railroad junction and commercial centre serving the surrounding agricultural region. Its institutions of higher education include the University of Nebraska, Union College, and Nebraska Wesleyan University. ancient Lindum City and administrative district (pop., 2001: 85,616), administrative and historic county of Lincolnshire, eastern England. Under the name Lindum, it served as a Roman fortress, and by AD 71 it had become a settlement for retired soldiers. It later came under Danish rule, and in the Middle Ages it was one of England's major towns. Henry II gave the city its first charter in 1154. It is a market centre for an agricultural region and also possesses some manufacturing. It has many medieval buildings, including the cathedral (begun 1075). Kirstein Lincoln Edward Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts Lincoln Abraham Lincoln Benjamin Lincoln Douglas Debates Steffens Joseph Lincoln
of American usage, originally in honor of Abraham Lincoln
capital of the state of Nebraska; located in southeastern Nebraska; site of the University of Nebraska
long-wooled mutton sheep originally from Lincolnshire
long-wooled mutton sheep originally from Lincolnshire capital of the state of Nebraska; located in southeastern Nebraska; site of the University of Nebraska 16th President of the United States; saved the Union during the Civil War and emancipated the slaves; was assassinated by Booth (1809-1865)
16th President of the United States; saved the Union during the Civil War and emancipated the slaves; was assassinated by Booth (1809-1865)
Pertaining to Abe Lincoln, as w: Lincoln Logs
dedicated
Lincoln Logs
A construction toy consisting of miniature, notched logs from which log cabins and similar buildings may be made
Lincoln green
Of a bright green colour
Lincoln green
A bright green colour

Lincoln green colour:.

Lincoln greens
plural form of Lincoln green
Lincoln Center
an important cultural centre in New York City, consisting of several buildings where plays, concerts, and operas are performed. It includes the Metropolitan Opera House and the New York City Ballet
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
Travertine-clad cultural complex on the western side of Manhattan (1962-68), built by a board of architects headed by Wallace K. Harrison (1895-1981). The buildings, situated around a plaza with a fountain, are the home of the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Opera, the New York Philharmonic, the New York City Ballet, and the Juilliard School. Harrison himself designed the Metropolitan Opera building, and Eero Saarinen designed the Vivian Beaumont Theater. Philip Johnson's New York State Theater incorporates a Classical facade and a four-story lobby. Johnson also rebuilt Avery Fisher Hall (home of the New York Philharmonic), originally designed by Max Abramovitz, to correct acoustic deficiencies and improve the lobby spaces
Lincoln Edward Kirstein
born May 4, 1907, Rochester, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 5, 1996, New York, N.Y. U.S. dance authority, impresario, and writer. He graduated from Harvard, where he founded the literary magazine Hound & Horn. Financially independent, he focused his artistic interests on ballet and in 1933 persuaded the choreographer George Balanchine to move to the U.S. to found a ballet school and company. The School of American Ballet opened in 1934; Kirstein was its director from 1940 to 1989. He and Balanchine jointly established a series of ballet companies, culminating in the New York City Ballet (1948), of which he served as general director until 1989. He wrote seven books on ballet, including the classic history Dance (1935)
Lincoln Kirstein
born May 4, 1907, Rochester, N.Y., U.S. died Jan. 5, 1996, New York, N.Y. U.S. dance authority, impresario, and writer. He graduated from Harvard, where he founded the literary magazine Hound & Horn. Financially independent, he focused his artistic interests on ballet and in 1933 persuaded the choreographer George Balanchine to move to the U.S. to found a ballet school and company. The School of American Ballet opened in 1934; Kirstein was its director from 1940 to 1989. He and Balanchine jointly established a series of ballet companies, culminating in the New York City Ballet (1948), of which he served as general director until 1989. He wrote seven books on ballet, including the classic history Dance (1935)
Lincoln Memorial
a marble building in Washington, D.C., which has a large statue (=carved stone figure) of Abraham Lincoln
Lincoln Park
A city of southeast Michigan, a residential suburb of Detroit. Population: 41,832
Lincoln Steffens
a US newspaper writer who had a special interest in corruption (=dishonest behaviour by people in official positions) . He is famous especially for his magazine articles about crime and dishonesty in city governments, some of which also appear in his book The Shame of the Cities (1866-1936). born April 6, 1866, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 9, 1936, Carmel, Calif. U.S. journalist and reformer. He worked for New York City newspapers (1892-1901) and was managing editor of McClure's Magazine (1901-06), where he began his famous muckraking articles later published as The Shame of the Cities (1904) exposing corruption in politics and big business. He lectured widely and aroused public interest in seeking solutions and taking action. He later supported revolutionary activities in Mexico and Russia and lived in Europe (1917-27). The success of his Autobiography (1931) returned him to the lecture circuit
Lincoln Tunnel
the Lincoln Tunnel a tunnel for traffic under the Hudson River in New York City, which connects Manhattan with New Jersey
Lincoln's Birthday
the birthday of Abraham Lincoln, February 12th, which is a legal holiday in many US states Presidents' Day
Lincoln's Inn
one of the Inns of Court in London
Lincoln-Douglas Debates
Series of seven debates between Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln and Democratic Sen. Stephen A. Douglas in the 1858 Illinois senatorial campaign. They focused on slavery and its extension into the western territories. Lincoln criticized Douglas for his support of popular sovereignty and the Kansas-Nebraska Act, while Douglas accused Lincoln of advocating racial equality and disruption of the Union. Douglas won reelection, but Lincoln's antislavery position and oratorical brilliance made him a national figure in the young Republican Party
lincoln green
A color of cloth formerly made in Lincoln, England; the cloth itself
lincoln memorial
memorial building in Washington containing a large marble statue of Abraham Lincoln
lincoln's birthday
the day on which President Abraham Lincoln is remembered
Abraham Lincoln
{i} (1809-1865) 16th president of the United States (1861-1865)
Abraham Lincoln
a US politician in the Republican Party who was President of the US from 1861 to 1865. He won political support in the Northern US states because of his speeches against slavery, but this made him unpopular in the Southern states, where slaves did most of the farm work. The American Civil War started soon after he became President, when the Southern states decided to leave the US. In 1863 he announced the Emancipation Proclamation, by which all slaves in the US became free people. He also gave a famous speech known as the Gettysburg Address in 1863. A few days after the war ended, he was shot and killed in a theatre by an actor called John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln is one of the most important US presidents, and was sometimes called 'Honest Abe' because everyone admired his honesty (1809-65). born Feb. 12, 1809, near Hodgenville, Ky., U.S. died April 15, 1865, Washington, D.C. 16th president of the U.S. (1861-65). Born in a Kentucky log cabin, he moved to Indiana in 1816 and to Illinois in 1830. After working as a storekeeper, a rail-splitter, a postmaster, and a surveyor, he enlisted as a volunteer in the Black Hawk War (1832) and was elected captain of his company. He taught himself law and, having passed the bar examination, began practicing in Springfield, Ill., in 1836. As a successful circuit-riding lawyer from 1837, he was noted for his shrewdness, common sense, and honesty (earning the nickname "Honest Abe"). From 1834 to 1840 he served in the Illinois state legislature, and in 1847 he was elected as a Whig to the U.S. House of Representatives. In 1856 he joined the Republican Party, which nominated him as its candidate in the 1858 Senate election. In a series of seven debates with Stephen A. Douglas (the Lincoln-Douglas Debates), he argued against the extension of slavery into the territories. Though morally opposed to slavery, he was not an abolitionist; indeed, he attempted to rebut Douglas's charge that he was a dangerous radical, by reassuring audiences that he did not favour political equality for blacks. Despite his loss in the election, the debates brought him national attention. In the 1860 presidential election, he ran against Douglas again and won by a large margin in the electoral college, though he received only two-fifths of the popular vote. The South opposed his position on slavery in the territories, and before his inauguration seven Southern states had seceeded from the Union. The ensuing American Civil War completely consumed Lincoln's administration. He excelled as a wartime leader, creating a high command for directing all the country's energies and resources toward the war effort and combining statecraft and overall command of the armies with what some have called military genius. However, his abrogation of some civil liberties, especially the writ of habeas corpus, and the closing of several newspapers by his generals disturbed both Democrats and Republicans, including some members of his own cabinet. To unite the North and influence foreign opinion, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation (1863); his Gettysburg Address (1863) further ennobled the war's purpose. The continuing war affected some Northerners' resolve and his reelection was not assured, but strategic battle victories turned the tide, and he easily defeated George B. McClellan in 1864. His platform included passage of the 13th Amendment outlawing slavery (ratified 1865). At his second inaugural, with victory in sight, he spoke of moderation in reconstructing the South and building a harmonious Union. On April 14, five days after the war ended, he was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth
Benjamin Lincoln
born Jan. 24, 1733, Hingham, Mass. died May 9, 1810, Boston American Revolutionary officer. After serving in the Massachusetts militia (1755-76), he was appointed major general in the Continental Army. As commander of forces in the South in 1780, he was forced to surrender with 7,000 troops after the British victory at Charleston, S.C. Released in a prisoner exchange, he served in the Yorktown campaign in 1781. From 1781 to 1783 he served as secretary of war, and in 1787 he commanded the militia forces that suppressed Shays' Rebellion. From 1789 to 1809 he was collector for the port of Boston
Joseph Lincoln Steffens
born April 6, 1866, San Francisco, Calif., U.S. died Aug. 9, 1936, Carmel, Calif. U.S. journalist and reformer. He worked for New York City newspapers (1892-1901) and was managing editor of McClure's Magazine (1901-06), where he began his famous muckraking articles later published as The Shame of the Cities (1904) exposing corruption in politics and big business. He lectured widely and aroused public interest in seeking solutions and taking action. He later supported revolutionary activities in Mexico and Russia and lived in Europe (1917-27). The success of his Autobiography (1931) returned him to the lecture circuit
Türkçe - İngilizce

lincoln teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

yasa koruma açısından hassas; miras ve kazanç beyanı; Lincoln Laboratuvarları De
(Askeri) law enforcement sensitive; leave and earnings statement; Lincoln Laboratories Experimental Satellite
lincoln

    Heceleme

    Lin·coln

    Türkçe nasıl söylenir

    lîngkın

    Telaffuz

    /ˈləɴɢkən/ /ˈlɪŋkən/

    Etimoloji

    [ 'li[ng]-k&n ] (noun.) 1837. Old English Lindcoln, from Latin Lindum Colonia, from Brythonic Lindo, Lindon, probably from *linn ‘pool’, in reference to the Brayford.

    Videolar

    ... on, like, John Adams and Abraham Lincoln. And I read this, like, 750-page book called ...
    ... But as Abraham Lincoln understood, there are also some things we do better together. ...

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