irony

listen to the pronunciation of irony
İngilizce - Türkçe
{i} hiciv
{i} insana alay gibi gelen bir tesadüf
(Felsefe) alaysılama
ince alay

Ses tonu öfke ve ince alayı gösterebilir. - Tone of voice can indicate anger and irony.

istihza
ironi

Yaptığım ironiyi anlamayan tek kişi sensin. - You're the only one who didn't understand the irony of what I said.

Tom ironiyi ya da alaycılığı anlamıyor. - Tom doesn't understand irony or sarcasm.

demire benzer
{i} tersini söyleyerek alay etme
demir
demirimsi
irony of fate kaderin cilvesi
dramatic irony bir piyeste karakterin bilmediği fakat seyircinin
{i} rastlantı
{i} gizli alay
demirli
kastolunan şeyin aksini söylemekten ibaret bir çeşit kinaye
demirden yapılmış
{i} alay

Ses tonu öfke ve ince alayı gösterebilir. - Tone of voice can indicate anger and irony.

Tom ironiyi ya da alaycılığı anlamıyor. - Tom doesn't understand irony or sarcasm.

irony of fate
kaderin cilvesi
dramatic irony
(Tiyatro) dramatik ironi
dramatic irony
sahnede karakterin bilmediği ama seyircilerin bildiği şey
twisted irony
çarpıtılmış ironi
İngilizce - İngilizce
The quality or state of an event being both coincidental and contradictory in a humorous or poignant and extremely improbable way
A statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean something different from, or the opposite of what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than their literal intention, notably as a form of humor
Of or pertaining to the metal iron

The food had an irony taste to it.

Ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist; Socratic irony
Dramatic irony: a theatrical effect in which the meaning of a situation, or some incongruity in the plot, is understood by the audience, but not by the characters in the play
censure or ridicule under cover of praise or compliment
the use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meeting
the use of words to express something different from and often quite opposite to their literal meaning
In literary criticism, the effect of language in which the intended meaning is the opposite of what is stated The title of Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" is ironic because what Swift proposes in this essay is cannibalism hardly "modest "
Dissimulation; ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist
saying [or writing] one thing, whilst meaning the opposite
expression that comes across contrary to the intended meaning, often because the audience knows what the speaker does not
saying something, but meaning the opposite E g , "that Mustang Cobra is really bad " Usually irony is not deceptive; the audience is supposed to realize what the speaker really means But irony can also be used to keep some of the audience, those who don't "get it," in the dark Because Socrates used irony this way, he is often called "the ironic man," famous for "Socratic irony " Some have argued that Paul also deserves the title
The use of language to express something quite different from or opposite to its literal meaning
a method of expression in which the intended meaning of the words is the direct opposite of their usual sense Example: "The speaker was using irony when he said that the stupid plan was 'very clever '" Irony can also mean a combination of circumstances or a result that is the opposite of what might be expected or considered appropriate
techniques that involve surprising, interesting, or amusing contradictions
A striking contrast between the apparent and the real situation or between what a character says and what the reader knows  
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; "the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated"
A literary device that uses contradictory statements to reveal a reality different from what appears to be true
is a result different from the expected
the difference between how you might expect something to be and how it actually is, for example when the slaves in The Two Generals like the brother who believes in slavery more than the one who would set them free
a situation or statement characterized by a significant difference between what is expected or understood and what actually happens or is meant See cosmic irony and dramatic irony Close Window
A sort of humor, ridicule, or light sarcasm, which adopts a mode of speech the meaning of which is contrary to the literal sense of the words
Resembling iron in taste, hardness, or other physical property
A statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean the opposite of what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than their literal intention
The mythos (sense 2) of the literature concerned primarily with a "realistic" level of experience, usually taking the form of a parody or contrasting analogue to romance Such irony may be tragic or comic in its main emphasis; when comic it is normally identical with the usual meaning of satire
The suggestion of the opposite, or nearly the opposite, as in saying that being caught in a freezing downpour is "delightful "
a general definition: suggesting more than is actually said saying one thing and meaning another (verbal irony) seeing contradictions between the way things appear and what they really represent (an ironic world view), and exposing those contradictions (satirical irony) recognizing that human beings are nothing more than the playthings of fate or God - revealing the Catch-22 nature of human existence, such as the habit of striving for an ideal which cannot be met (cosmic irony)
Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, irony chains; irony particles
witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Johathan Swift
The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning; an expression marked by such a deliberate contrast between apparent and intended meaning; incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; "the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated" a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
stating something by saying another quite different thing, sometimes its opposite An example is Sir Thomas Wyatt's "And I have leave to go, of her goodness" from his "They flee from me "
two separate and contrasting levels of meaning embedded in one message
{i} sarcasm, speech or writing which is intended to communicate a meaning contrary to its literal sense; contrast between what is expected or desired and reality
A device by which a writer expresses a meaning contradictory to the stated or ostensible one (used to achieve special rhetorical or artistic effects)
this means that something is the opposite of the meaning of the words, for example 'a fine mess' 'Fine' usually means something good, but in this case it means a bad mess
a difference between the actual result of a sequence of events and the expected results
If you talk about the irony of a situation, you mean that it is odd or amusing because it involves a contrast. The irony is that many officials in Washington agree in private that their policy is inconsistent. Language device in which the real intent is concealed or contradicted by the literal meaning of words or a situation. Verbal irony, either spoken or written, arises from an awareness of contrast between what is and what ought to be. Dramatic irony, an incongruity in a theatrical work between what is expected and what occurs, depends on the structure of a play rather than its use of words, and it is often created by the audience's awareness of a fate in store for the characters that they themselves do not suspect. See also figure of speech
[noun]: incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs [Characterization]
Irony is a subtle form of humour which involves saying things that you do not mean. Sinclair examined the closed, clever face for any hint of irony, but found none
At its most basic, a difference or gap between the presentation/representation of something and its reality In other words, when what something appears to be and what it is are not the same Irony can be engaged or detached: Engaged irony uses the gaps between reality and representation to make a point or expose something; detached irony exploits gaps for immediate effect, like humor, satire or surface criticism Irony can also occur at different levels of a text; for instance, verbal irony would occur at the level of the word or sentence, where double meanings come into play; dramatic irony would occur at the level of the plot, where events and action are constructed in a way to take the reader in one direction while the reality is something else (a technique often found with 1st person unreliable narrators and 3rd person privileged narrators)
irony mark
The proposed punctuation mark ؟ or ⸮, used to suggest irony or sarcasm in a question
irony aside
in total seriousness, without irony
irony of fate
incongruity between what is expected in life and the actual outcome
Socratic irony
The act of asking someone a question in order to demonstrate his or her ignorance
dramatic irony
A theatrical effect in which the meaning of a situation, or some incongruity in the plot, is understood by the audience, but not by the characters in the play
ırony
{a} made of or like iron, hard
ırony
{n} a meaning contrary to words spoken
Socratic irony
Profession of ignorance and of willingness to learn as one interrogates another on the meaning of a term
dramatic irony
(theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
dramatic irony
A situation in which the audience or reader shares with the author knowledge of present or future circumstances of which a character is ignorant
dramatic irony
situation where a character is unaware of something the audience knows
dramatic irony
when the reader, listener or viewer understands more of what is going on than the characters involved
dramatic irony
The situation when the audience knows something the characters don't, as in Shakespeare's Macbeth, when King Duncan remarks on his inability to judge character - while warmly greeting the man (Macbeth) we already know plans to assassinate him
dramatic irony
this occurs when a reader knows things a character is ignorant of or when characters' speech and action reveals that they do not understand themselves
dramatic irony
The dramatic effect achieved by leading an audience to understand an incongruity between a situation and the accompanying speeches, while the characters in the play remain unaware of the incongruity. when the people watching a play know something that the characters do not, and can understand the real importance or meaning of what is happening
dramatic irony
a plot device in which a character holds a position or has an expectation that is reversed or fulfilled in a way that the character did not expect but that we, as readers or as audience members, have anticipated because our knowledge of events or individuals is more complete than the character's Close Window
ironies
plural of irony
socratic irony
ignorance and of willingness to learn as one questions another on the meaning of a term; pretended ignorance to provoke discussion and promote the search for truth
socratic irony
admission of your own ignorance and willingness to learn while exposing someone's inconsistencies by close questioning
touch of irony
somewhat of a paradox, a bit of sarcasm
tragic irony
Dramatic irony in a tragedy
Türkçe - İngilizce

irony teriminin Türkçe İngilizce sözlükte anlamı

ironi
irony

Tom doesn't understand irony or sarcasm. - Tom ironiyi ya da alaycılığı anlamıyor.

You're the only one who didn't understand the irony of what I said. - Yaptığım ironiyi anlamayan tek kişi sensin.

irony