tithe

listen to the pronunciation of tithe
English - Turkish
aşar

Aşar vergisi Fransız Eski rejiminin direklerinden biriydi. - Tithe was one of the pillars of the French Ancien Régime.

onda bir
aşar vergisi

Aşar vergisi Fransız Eski rejiminin direklerinden biriydi. - Tithe was one of the pillars of the French Ancien Régime.

ondalık
öşür
{f} gelirinin yüzde onunu kiliseye vermek
{i} ondalık vergi
{f} onda bir oranında vergi koymak
{i} bir Hristiyanın kiliseye vermek üzere ayırdığı gelirinin yüzde onu
ondaondalık vergi
{f} aşar vergisi vermek
English - English
A small part or proportion
Tenth
To collect a tithe
A contribution to one's religious community or congregation of worship
The tenth part of the increase arising from the profits of land and stock, allotted to the clergy for their support, as in England, or devoted to religious or charitable uses. Almost all the tithes of England and Wales are commuted by law into rent charges. Concept originates in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament)
A tenth
To pay a tithe
{n} the tenth part of any thing, a portion
{v} to pay or take the tenth part, to tax
a levy of one tenth of something
a tax in support of the church
Ten percent of one's material wealth
Tp pay tithes
A tenth part of one's income usually paid to a church
{i} tenth part; tenth part of one's income paid as a tax for the support of religious institutions
A tenth; the tenth part of anything; specifically, the tenthpart of the increase arising from the profits of land and stock, allotted to the clergy for their support, as in England, or devoted to religious or charitable uses
the tenthpart of the increase arising from the profits of land and stock, allotted to the clergy for their support, as in England, or devoted to religious or charitable uses. Almost all the tithes of England and Wales are commuted by law into rent charges
the tenth part of produce from the land and of other income, collected to support a parish priest and maintain his services
Ten-percent of one’s income, usually understood to mean ten-percent of one adjusted gross income, given as an offering for the benefit of others and as an act of piety, justice and faith in God Most Metanoians give part, but not all, of their tithe to the congregation
Formerly, money due as a tax for support of the clergy or church
tax assessment of one-tenth income due to local parish
In English law, one-tenth of a person's annual earnings
A tithe is a fixed amount of money or goods that is given regularly in order to support a church, a priest, or a charity. Contribution of a tenth of one's income for religious purposes. The practice of tithing was established in the Hebrew scriptures and was adopted by the Western Christian church. It was enjoined by eccesiastical law from the 6th century and enforced in Europe by secular law from the 8th century. After the Reformation, tithes continued to be imposed for the benefit of both the Protestant and Roman Catholic churches. Tithes were eventually repealed in France (1789), Ireland (1871), Italy (1887), and England (1936). In Germany support for churches is collected through the personal income tax and distributed according to the individual's religious affiliation. Tithing was never part of U.S. law, but members of certain churches (e.g., the Mormons) are required to tithe, and members of other churches may tithe voluntarily. Tithing was never accepted by the Eastern Orthodox churches
A parish tax or levy imposed on citizens for the support of a religious establishment In colonial Virginia, tithes were collected to support and maintain the Anglican Church
Almost all the tithes of England and Wales are commuted by law into rent charges
A kind of tax paid to a clergymen to help support him and the church
pay a tenth of one's income, especially to the church; "Although she left the church officially, she still tithes"
pay one tenth of; pay tithes on, especially to the church; "He tithed his income to the Church"
a tenth of the produce of the earth consecrated and set apart for special purposes The dedication of a tenth to God was recognized as a duty before the time of Moses Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek (Gen 14: 20; Heb 7: 6); and Jacob vowed unto the Lord and said, "Of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee "
Hence, a small part or proportion
exact a tithe from; "The church was tithed
giving 10 percent, or a first part of your income to God, usually by giving it to a church
an offering of a tenth part of some personal income a levy of one tenth of something pay a tenth of one's income, especially to the church; "Although she left the church officially, she still tithes"
an offering of a tenth part of some personal income
A tenth-part of produce as a local tax; eliminated by the 1830s Tithe Apportionments which determined a rent instead
To levy a tenth part on; to tax to the amount of a tenth; to pay tithes on
in English law, the tenth part of one's annual increase paid to support noblemen and clergy; amount of annual poll tax
A tenth part of agricultural produce, personal income or profits contributed as a tax for the support of the church or clergy
levy a tithe on (produce or a crop); "The wool was thithed"
exact a tithe from; "The church was tithed"
{f} pay a tenth of one's income to support the Church; collect taxes equalling one-tenth of each person's income to support the Church
tithe barn
barn originally built to hold tithes paid in kind and common in England
tithing
Present participle of tithe
tithing
{n} a part of a parish, district, tithe
A tithe
teind
cattle tithe
tenth of one's cattle and sheep which the Israelites were commanded to set aside
tith
Tight; nimble
tithes
look at trumah and maaser
tithes
Three Required? See also Gifts, Offerings
tithes
Tithes were typically a local tax of one tenth of the years product of land and labour It was levied on a parish basis to support the parish priest, maintain the fabric of the church and support the poor of the parish It was originally a voluntary contribution and had its roots in the Anglo Saxon Frankpledge where groups of ten persons were largely responsible for each other within the group It was made compulsory in 10th century and was enforced both through the civil and ecclesiastical courts Tithes were divided into greater (rectorial) tithes, the product of the arable fields and value of stock, and lesser (vicarial) tithes, raised from labour and minor produce i e the day laborers and cottagers Where the Rector was not the incumbent he took a share of the greater tithes and his appointed vicar would have to survive on the lesser tithes supplemented by the glebe income and the freehold of the churchyard
tithes
Monetary support for the established church, taken from everyone of any substance no matter what their own beliefs Quakers made the abolition of tithes one of their main issues in the last years before the restoration (Hutton, 47)
tithes
A tenth part of the produce of a family which was paid to the Church as a tax
tithes
Tithes The tenth part of an income donated for religious purposes Tithes were required by Mosaic law, which demanded payment in kind from all agricultural produce Church law also required tithes to maintain churches and clergy They were abolished in Britain in 1936
tithes
plural of tithe
tithes
The old feudal right of the clergy to claim one tenth of all produce and animals within the parish Later changed to payment of monies and finally commuted from 1836
tithing
a rural division of land, originally corresponding to ten households under the frank-pledge system
tithing
{i} paying the tenth part of
tithing
The act of levying or taking tithes; that which is taken as tithe; a tithe
tithing
A number or company of ten householders who, dwelling near each other, were sureties or frankpledges to the king for the good behavior of each other; a decennary
to tithe
addecimate
tithe

    Turkish pronunciation

    taydh

    Pronunciation

    /ˈtīᴛʜ/ /ˈtaɪð/

    Etymology

    [ 'tI[th] ] (verb.) before 12th century. Old English tēoþa (Old English underwent the Ingvaeonic nasal spirant law, which resulted in the elimination of the nasal consonant from Germanic *tehunþ-). Compare Icelandic tíund.

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