suffrage

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English - English
A vote in deciding a particular question
The right or chance to vote, express an opinion, or participate in a decision
A kind of prayer
the right or privilege of voting
{n} a vote, voice, approbation
Aid; assistance
A prayer in general, as one offered for the faithful departed
The right for a group of people, such as adult female citizens, to vote in public elections
Testimony; attestation; witness; approval
The right to vote The right is also called the franchise Historically, the right to vote was restricted to white males and had the further requirement of property ownership Over the course of U S history, the franchise has been expanded by various acts of Congress and, chiefly, by various amendments to the Constitution Although the states may establish requirements for voting eligibility, they may not deny or abridge the right to vote because of race (15th Amendment, ratified 1870) or sex (19th Amendment, ratified 1920) In 1971, the voting age was lowered to 18 years by the ratification of the 26th Amendment
n [in sense 1, fr ME, fr MF, fr ML suffragium, fr L, vote, political support, fr suffragari to support with one's vote; in other senses, fr L suffragium] (14c) 1: a short intercessory prayer usu in a series 2: a vote given in deciding a controverted question or in the choice of a person for an office or trust 3: the right of voting
To vote for; to elect
the right to vote in elections
A short petition, as those after the creed in matins and evensong
{i} right to vote; vote cast in favor of a specific candidate; short prayer or petition (Ecclesiastical)
This entry gives the age at enfranchisement and whether the right to vote is universal or restricted
The right to vote at elections All Australian citizens 18 or over have suffrage
The right to vote
Suffrage is the right of people to vote for a government or national leader. the women's suffrage movement. the right to vote in national elections (suffragium )
a legal right guaranteed by the 15th amendment to the US constitution; guaranteed to women by the 19th amendment; "American women got the vote in 1920"
means primarily the hough or pastern of a horse; so called because it bends under, and not over, like the knee-joint When a horse is lying down and wants to rise on his legs, it is this joint which is brought into action; and when the horse stands on his legs it is these “ankle-joints” which support him Metaphorically, voters are the pastern joints of a candidate, whereby he is supported A suffragan is a titular bishop who is appointed to assist a prelate; and in relation to an archbishop all bishops are suffragans The archbishop is the horse, and the bishops are his pasterns
A vote given in deciding a controverted question, or in the choice of a man for an office or trust; the formal expression of an opinion; assent; vote
The right or chance to vote, express an opinion or participate in a decision
a The right or privilege of voting; the franchise b The exercise of such a right
censitary suffrage
Also known as "censitary suffrage", the opposite of Equal suffrage, meaning that the votes cast by those eligible to vote are not equal, but are weighed differently according to the person's rank in the census (e.g., people with high income have more votes than those with a small income). Suffrage may therefore be limited, usually to the propertied classes, but can still be universal, including, for instance, women or ethnic minorities, if they meet the census
census suffrage
Also known as "censitary suffrage", the opposite of Equal suffrage, meaning that the votes cast by those eligible to vote are not equal, but are weighed differently according to the person's rank in the census (e.g., people with high income have more votes than those with a small income). Suffrage may therefore be limited, usually to the propertied classes, but can still be universal, including, for instance, women or ethnic minorities, if they meet the census
compulsory suffrage
Where Compulsory suffrage exists, those who are eligible to vote are required by law to do so
equal suffrage
Equal suffrage is sometimes confused with Universal suffrage, although its meaning is the removal of graded votes, where a voter could possess a number of votes in accordance with income, wealth or social status
universal suffrage
Where Universal suffrage exists, the right to vote is not restricted by race, gender, belief, wealth or social status. It typically does not extend a right to vote to all residents of a region; distinctions are frequently made in regard to citizenship, age, and occasionally mental capacity or criminal convictions
women's suffrage
Women's suffrage is the right of women to vote on the same terms as men. This was the goal of the suffragists and the "Suffragettes"
Women's Suffrage
{i} movement for women's suffrage is an economic and social and political reform movement intended to extend suffrage
suffrages
plural of suffrage
woman suffrage
Right of women by law to vote in national and local elections. Women's voting rights became an issue in the 19th century, especially in Britain and the U.S. In the U.S. the woman suffrage movement arose from the antislavery movement (see abolitionism) and from the advocacy of figures such as Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who believed that equality should extend to both women and African Americans. They organized the Seneca Falls Convention (1848), which issued a declaration calling for woman suffrage and for the right of women to educational and employment opportunities. In 1850 Lucy Stone held the movement's first national convention. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony formed the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869 to secure an amendment to the Constitution granting women the right to vote, while Stone founded the American Woman Suffrage Association to seek similar amendments to state constitutions; in 1890 the two organizations merged as the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Following Wyoming's lead in 1890, states began adopting such amendments; by 1918 women had won suffrage in 15 states. After a woman suffrage amendment was passed by Congress, a vigorous campaign brought ratification, and in August 1919 the 19th Amendment became part of the Constitution. In Britain the first woman suffrage committee was formed in Manchester in 1865. In the 1870s suffragists submitted petitions bearing nearly three million signatures. Despite growing support, suffrage bills were continually defeated; in frustration, some suffragists became militant activists under the leadership of Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. Parliament finally passed the Representation of the People Act in 1918, by which time women had already won voting rights in New Zealand (1893), Australia (1902), Finland (1906), Norway (1913), the Soviet Union (1917), Poland (1918), Sweden (1919), Germany (1919), and Ireland (1922). After World War II woman-suffrage laws were adopted in many countries, including France, Italy, India, and Japan
woman suffrage
{i} right of a woman to vote
suffrage

    Hyphenation

    suf·frage

    Turkish pronunciation

    sʌfrîc

    Synonyms

    franchise

    Pronunciation

    /ˈsəfrəʤ/ /ˈsʌfrɪʤ/

    Etymology

    [ 's&-frij, sometimes ] (noun.) 14th century. From Latin suffragium, 'support, vote, right of voting'.

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