spoonerism

listen to the pronunciation of spoonerism
Turkish - Turkish
ismi Oxford da din profesörü olan Mr. Spooner dan gelme, bir dil sürçmesi türü
English - English
A play on words on a phrase in which the initial (usually consonantal) sounds of two or more of the main words are transposed

The spoonerism The queer old dean (instead of the dear old Queen) is attributed to Rev. Spooner.

(SPOON-uhr-iz'm), noun: The transposition of usually initial sounds in a pair of words
the interchange of the initial letters of two words, usually as a slip of the tongue "I think I'll go outside and get a freth of bresh air "
transposition of initial consonants in a pair of words
A phrase in which the initial (usually consonantal) sounds of two or more of the main words are accidentally transposed
A spoonerism is a mistake made by a speaker in which the first sounds of two words are changed over, often with a humorous result, for example when someone says `wrong load' instead of `long road'. a phrase in which the speaker accidentally exchanges the first sounds of two words, with a funny result, for example 'sew you to a sheet' instead of 'show you to a seat' (William Spooner (1844-1930), British university teacher who supposedly often made such mistakes). Reversal of the initial letters or syllables of two or more words, such as "I have a half-warmed fish in my mind" (for "half-formed wish") and "a blushing crow" ("a crushing blow"). The word is derived from the name of William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930), a distinguished Anglican clergyman and warden of New College, Oxford, a nervous man who committed many "spoonerisms." Such transpositions are often made intentionally for comic effect
The accidental or deliberate transposition of the initial letters etc of two or more words in a phrase E g , ``You have tasted a whole worm You have hissed my mystery lectures You were caught fighting a liar in the quad You will leave by the next town drain '' Named after Revd William Archibald Spooner (1844-1930) who was Warden of New College, although many `original' spoonerisms are now known to be apocryphal
{i} unintentional transposition of the first letters of two or more words
spoonerisms
plural of spoonerism
spoonerism

    Hyphenation

    spoon·e·ri·sm

    Pronunciation

    Etymology

    [ 'spü-n&-"ri-z&m ] (noun.) 1900. Named after the Reverend W. A. Spooner (1844-1930), who is supposed to have habitually made such slip-ups.

    Word of the day

    irrefragable
Favorites