expressionism

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English - English
A somewhat analogous genre in early 20th century music
A movement in the arts in which the artist did not depict objective reality, but rather a subjective expression of their inner experiences
any art in which conventional ideas of realism and proportion seem to have been strongly influenced by the artist's emotion, with resultant distortions of shape and colour
highly emotional style in art that sought to express disturbed states of mind
fantasy and distortion in lighting, editing and costumes designed to reflect the inner feelings of the characters and/or the filmmaker
This 20th century European art movement exaggerated and distorted its subjects and used intensified color to convey the painters' emotional experience rather than the exact representation of nature Among the early Expressionists were Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, and Edvard Munch
A term first used by some painters in the early 20th century and then also applied to other art forms, including music It means that the music, or any other work of art, is an expression of the artist's state of mind
An art movement that stresses the psychological and emotional content of the work, associated particularly with German art in the early 20th century
A movement in the arts in which the artist did not depict objective reality, but rather a subjective expression of his inner experiences
The expression of emotion through color and brush stroke
A high energy form of music in which soloists stretch out over simple themes
a style of music, art, and literature in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in which the artist uses a medium (sound, color, shape, language, etc ) to convey strong feelings or emotions
(emotionalism): The essence of art is expression of the inner emotions, feelings, moods, and mental states of the artist Good art effectively and sincerely brings these inner states to an external objectification (R J Collingwood)
An artistic style in which an emotion is more important than adherence to any perceptual realism It is characterized by the exaggeration and distortion of objects in order to evoke and emotional response from the viewer Back To Top
Incentive Germanic art and architecture movement emphasising the notion of expressing an inner vision, results were sometimes fantastical
A style in which the artist’s emotions are the impetus of the work The term can describe any painting that is primarily based on the release of the artist’s feelings and impulses
An early 20th-century musical style, employing an abstract approach to music, unlike impressionism
an art movement early in the 20th century; the artist's subjective expression of inner experiences was emphasized; an inner feeling was expressed through a distorted rendition of reality
A 20th-century European art movement that stresses the expression of emotion and the inner vision of the artist rather than the exact representation of nature Distorted lines and shapes and exaggerated colors are used for emotional impact Vincent Van Gogh is regarded as the precursor of this movement
a style in painting where the artist disregards traditional standards of proportion and realism while expressing his or her own inner experience of emotions by using distortion and emphasis
{i} 20th century art movement stressing the expression of subjective experience rather than a literal representation of reality
a term usually used to describe painting, it is used to describe music that is not an impression, that is an outward observation, but more of an inner experience
a 20th Century art movement that turned away from the representation of nature and to the expression of emotional intensity, characterized by bold distortions of form and violent color; forerunners were Vincent Van Gogh and the Fauves Other such artists were Georges Ronault, James Ensor, Marc Chagall, and Emil Nolde Examples
A form of art in which there is a desire to express what is felt rather than perceived or reasoned
Expressionism is a style of art, literature, and music which uses symbols and exaggeration to represent emotions, rather than representing physical reality. a style of painting, writing, or music that expresses feelings rather than describing objects and experiences. In the visual arts, artistic style in which the artist depicts not objective reality but the subjective emotions that objects or events arouse. This aim is accomplished through the distortion and exaggeration of shape and the vivid or violent application of colour. Its roots are found in the works of Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and James Ensor. In 1905 the movement took hold with a group of German artists known as Die Brücke; their works influenced such artists as Georges Rouault, Chaim Soutine, Max Beckmann, Käthe Kollwitz, and Ernst Barlach. The group of artists known as Der Blaue Reiter were also considered Expressionists. Expressionism was the dominant style in Germany after World War I; postwar Expressionists included George Grosz and Otto Dix. Its emotional qualities were adopted by other 20th-century art movements. See also Abstract Expressionism
abstract expressionism
An American genre of modern art that used improvised techniques to generate highly abstract forms
expressionist
A painter who paints in this style
Abstract Expressionism
American art movement of the 1940s that emphasized form and color within a nonrepresentational framework Jackson Pollock initiated the revolutionary technique of splattering the paint directly on canvas to achieve the subconscious interpretation of the artist's inner vision of reality
Abstract Expressionism
An American art movement from the 1950s and 60s Paintings by the Abstract Expressionists are non-objective, meaning that they have no basis in recognizable representations of the real world The birth of Abstract Expressionism marked the shift of the center of the art world from Europe to the US
Abstract Expressionism
The Russian Wassily Kandinsky sought Expressionism emotions in non-objective, or abstract, paintings He saw that objects and figures were not necessary to produce feelings in art He could do it with lines, shapes, and colors alone Kandinsky painted Expressionistic art that was abstract: hence, Abstract Expressionism The individual styles of Abstract Expressionists are as varied and individual as a person's handwriting This art movement contains great variety, for its creative method inspires individualism in its artists Abstract Expressionism began with no preconceived notions other than the experience of their most recent canvases But as the artist proceeds with the painting, the Abstract Expressionist carefully considers where it is to go The artist thinks about the arrangement of colors, lines and shapes
Abstract Expressionism
An art movement, primarily in painting, that originated in the United States in the 1940s and remained strong through the 1950s Artists working in many different styles emphasized spontaneous personal expression in large paintings that are abstract or nonrepresentational One type of Abstract Expressionism is called action painting See also expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
An art style of imageless and anti-formal paintings, improvisatory, dynamic, energetic, and free in technique, centered in New York in the post World War II era It was mainly used to describe non-geometric abstractions, and first came into use as a description of Kandinsky's paintings from 1910-14, but it applied more accurately to the work of Gorky and Pollock, and later Newman and Rothko
Abstract Expressionism
style of abstract art characterized by sinuous lines, organic shapes, and few identifiable objects Often understood to be a free expression of subconscious mental activity
Abstract Expressionism
a style and movement of non-representational painting where artists apply paint quickly and forcefully to express feeling and emotion Developed in the 1940's and 1950's, the often-large works appear to be accidental but are very intentional Jackson Pollock is the movement's most important figures
Abstract Expressionism
A term used generally to describe contemporary painting It was originally applied to Kandinsky’s abstract painting of the 1920’s, but many painters are still painting in this style today Paintings of this style are abstractions, with no recognizable relationship to anything in nature The style reflects the innermost feeling of the artist and usually results as an emotional release of the artist’s anger, fear or frustration Abstract Expressionism was the first artistic movement to have its roots both in Europe and in America Artists who painted in this style include Willem De Kooning, Mark Rothko, and Jackson Pollack
Abstract Expressionism
an American art movement of the 1950s and 1960s which invites the viewer to intuitively respond to colour and form
Neo-Expressionism
Art movement, chiefly of painters, that dominated the European and American art market in the early to mid-1980s. It was controversial both in the quality of its production and in the highly commercialized aspects of its presentation. Its practitioners, including Julian Schnabel and Anselm Kiefer, reacted to the highly intellectualized abstract art of the 1970s by creating dramatic, gestural paintings that incorporated some figurative elements and recognizable symbols. Their art was characterized by a tense yet playful presentation of objects in a "primitivist" manner, vivid colour harmonies, large scale, and a sense of inner tension and alienation. See also Expressionism
abstract expressionism
a New York school of painting characterized by freely created abstractions; the first important school of American painting to develop independently of European styles
abstract expressionism
A school of painting that flourished after World War II until the early 1960s, characterized by the view that art is nonrepresentational and chiefly improvisational. a style of painting that developed in New York in the late 1940s. It shows shapes and patterns which do not look like real things or people, but are intended to express emotions. It was practised by artists such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. Movement in U.S. painting that began in the late 1940s. Its development was influenced by the radical work of Arshile Gorky and Hans Hofmann and by the immigration in the late 1930s and early '40s of many European avant-garde artists to New York. The Abstract Expressionist movement itself is generally regarded as having begun with the paintings done by Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning in the late 1940s and early '50s. Other artists who came to be associated with the style include Franz Kline, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, Philip Guston, Helen Frankenthaler, Barnett Newman, Adolph Gottlieb, Robert Motherwell, Lee Krasner, and Ad Reinhardt. The movement comprised many styles but shared several characteristics. The works were usually abstract (i.e., they depicted forms not found in the natural world); they emphasized freedom of emotional expression, technique, and execution; they displayed a single unified, undifferentiated field, network, or other image in unstructured space; and the canvases were large, to enhance the visual effect and project monumentality and power. The movement had a great impact on U.S. and European art in the 1950s; it marked the shift of the creative centre of modern painting from Paris to New York. See also abstract art; action painting
abstract expressionism
artistic movement seeking to give symbolic expression to inner experience
expressionist
expressionistic
expressionist
An expressionist is an artist, writer, or composer who uses the style of expressionism
expressionist
an artist who is an adherent of expressionism of or relating to expressionism; "expressionist art
expressionist
of or relating to expressionism; "expressionist art"
expressionist
an artist who is an adherent of expressionism
expressionist
Of, pertaining to, or in the style of expressionism
expressionist
{s} of or pertaining to expressionism; associated with Expressionism (20th-century art movement stressing the expression of subjective experience rather than a literal representation of reality)
expressionist
{i} artist associated with Expressionism (20th-century art movement stressing the expression of subjective experience rather than a literal representation of reality)
expressionist
Expressionist artists, writers, composers, or works use the style of expressionism. an extraordinary collection of expressionist paintings
expressionistic
of or relating to expressionism; "expressionist art"
expressionistic
{s} pertaining to or characterized by Expressionism (20th-century art movement stressing expression of subjective experience rather than literal representation of reality)
supra expressionism
a movement that tried to go beyond expressionism
expressionism
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