eliciting

listen to the pronunciation of eliciting
English - English
present participle of elicit
elicit
To evoke, educe (emotions, feelings, responses, etc.); to generate, obtain, or provoke as a response or answer
elicit
To use logic to arrive at truth; to derive by reason; deduce; construe
elicit
To draw out, bring out, bring forth (something latent); to obtain information from someone or something

Did you elicit a response?.

elicit
to educe or extract gradually or without violence
elicit
{v} to strike oiut, fetch out, draw out
elicit
{a} brought into act, drawn oujt
elicit
{f} extract from, bring out, draw out
elicit
derive by reason; "elicit a solution
elicit
If you elicit a response or a reaction, you do or say something which makes other people respond or react. Mr Norris said he was hopeful that his request would elicit a positive response
elicit
Elicited; drawn out; made real; open; evident
elicit
derive by reason; "elicit a solution"
elicit
draw out, as in: The band's performances always elicit praise from the critics
elicit
To obtain information from someone or something; to generate or obtain, as a response or answer
elicit
(V) -to draw or bring out or forth; educe; evoke
elicit
If you elicit a piece of information, you get it by asking the right questions. Phone calls elicited no further information. to succeed in getting information or a reaction from someone, especially when this is difficult (elicitus, past participle of elicere )
elicit
To draw out or entice forth; to bring to light; to bring out against the will; to deduce by reason or argument; as, to elicit truth by discussion
elicit
v (IC) To bring out; to evoke the inherent capabilities and talents of another To call forth
elicit
deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning); "We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant"
elicit
call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy"
eliciting

    Turkish pronunciation

    îlîsıtîng

    Pronunciation

    /əˈləsətəɴɢ/ /ɪˈlɪsətɪŋ/

    Etymology

    [ i-'li-s&t ] (transitive verb.) 1605. Latin elicitus, past participle of elicere, from e- + lacere to allure.

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