artichoke

listen to the pronunciation of artichoke
English - English
An edible plant related to the thistle
{n} a garden vegetable, a sunflower
1. Artichokes or globe artichokes are round green vegetables that have fleshy leaves arranged like the petals of a flower. see also Jerusalem artichoke. Large, coarse, herbaceous, thistlelike perennial plant (Cynara scolymus) of the composite family. The thick edible scales and bottom part (heart) of the immature flower heads are a culinary delicacy. The artichoke is native to the Mediterranean and is cultivated extensively in other regions with rich soil and a mild, humid climate. The Jerusalem artichoke is a tuber and does not resemble the artichoke
{i} plant with an edible flower head
Mediterranean thistlelike plant widely cultivated for its large edible flower head
The Cynara scolymus, a plant somewhat resembling a thistle, with a dilated, imbricated, and prickly involucre
The head (to which the name is also applied) is composed of numerous oval scales, inclosing the florets, sitting on a broad receptacle, which, with the fleshy base of the scales, is much esteemed as an article of food
a thistle-like flower head with edible fleshy leaves and heart
a thistle-like flower head with edible fleshy leaves and heart Mediterranean thistlelike plant widely cultivated for its large edible flower head
a type of vegetable (see Jerusalem artichoke and globe artichoke)
A name shared by three unrelated plants: the globe artichoke, Jerusalem artichoke and Chinese (or Japanese) artichoke Considered the true artichoke, the globe artichoke is cultivated mainly in California's mid-coastal region It is the bud of a large plant from the thistle family and has tough, petal shaped leaves The tender base of the leaves and the heart are the edible portions They are available year-round, with the peak season March through May Buy deep green, heavy for their size artichokes with a tight leaf formation
See Jerusalem artichoke
This name is shared by three unrelated plants: the globe, Jerusalem, and Chinese artichokes The globe artichoke is considered the true artichoke and is cultivated in California Buy deep green artichokes with a tight leaf formation
artichoke bottom
The edible fleshy receptacle at the bottom of an artichoke flower
artichoke bottoms
plural form of artichoke bottom
artichoke heart
the tender fleshy center of the immature artichoke flower
Jerusalem artichoke
the tuber of this plant, eaten as a vegetable; the sunchoke
Jerusalem artichoke
a variety of sunflower, Helianthus tuberosus, native to North America, having yellow flower heads and edible tubers
Jerusalem artichoke
(Botanik, Bitkibilim) Sunflower tuber eaten raw or boiled or sliced thin and fried as Saratoga chips, sunchoke, sunroot
Chinese artichoke
A perennial Chinese herb (Stachys affinis) in the mint family, cultivated for its edible tuberous underground stems that somewhat resemble a string of large whitish beads
Jerusalem artichoke
Jerusalem artichokes are small, yellowish-white vegetables that grow underground and look like potatoes. an artichoke. Sunflower (Helianthus tuberosus) native to North America and grown for its edible tubers. The aboveground part of the plant is a coarse, usually multibranched, frost-tender perennial, 7-10 ft (2-3 m) tall. The numerous showy flower heads have yellow ray flowers and yellow, brownish, or purplish disk flowers. The underground tubers vary in shape, size, and colour. Jerusalem artichoke is popular as a cooked vegetable in Europe and has long been cultivated in France as livestock feed. In the U.S. it is rarely cultivated
artichokes
Plural of artichoke
globe artichoke
a thistle-like flower head with edible fleshy leaves and heart
globe artichoke
Mediterranean thistlelike plant widely cultivated for its large edible flower head
globe artichoke
see artichoke. an artichoke
jerusalem artichoke
a type of root vegetable that looks like ginger
jerusalem artichoke
sunflower tuber eaten raw or boiled or sliced thin and fried as Saratoga chips
jerusalem artichoke
A tuber, also called sunchoke, with a very firm flesh and a flavor reminiscent of globe artichokes These are used as a vegetable, in soups, or cooked and served in salads
jerusalem artichoke
a bumpy brown-skinned tuber in the sunflower family
jerusalem artichoke
edible tuber of the Jerusalem artichoke
jerusalem artichoke
sunflower tuber eaten raw or boiled or sliced thin and fried as Saratoga chips tall perennial with hairy stems and leaves; widely cultivated for its large irregular edible tubers edible tuber of the Jerusalem artichoke
jerusalem artichoke
Knobby root (tuber) which keeps well under refrigeration; they discolor after peeling, so dip them in lemon water as the flesh is exposed They have a very firm flesh and a flavor reminiscent of globe artichokes These are used as a vegetable, in soups, or cooked and served in salads
jerusalem artichoke
This vegetable is not an artichoke and its name has nothing to do with Jerusalem This member of the sunflower family is also known as a "sunchoke" and has a flesh that is nutty, sweet, and crunchy
jerusalem artichoke
tall perennial with hairy stems and leaves; widely cultivated for its large irregular edible tubers
artichoke

    Hyphenation

    ar·ti·choke

    Turkish pronunciation

    ärtıçōk

    Pronunciation

    /ˈärtəˌʧōk/ /ˈɑːrtəˌʧoʊk/

    Etymology

    [ 'är-t&-"chOk ] (noun.) 1530. From northern Italian dialectal articiocco, alteration of arcicioffo (possibly influenced by ciocco (“stump”), from Old Spanish alcarchofa, from Arabic القرشوف (al-qaršūf, “artichoke”).

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