victor

listen to the pronunciation of victor
Englisch - Türkisch
muzaffer

Demokrasi uzun vadede muzaffer olacaktır. - Democracy will be victorious in the long run.

Muzaffer ordu, ülkeden geri çekildi. - The victorious army withdrew from the country.

fatih
galip

Biz tamamen galiptik. - We were completely victorious.

Tom ve Mary galip geldiler. - Tom and Mary were victorious.

kazanan

Kazanan, parsayı toplar. - To the victor go the spoils.

Kaybeden gülümserse kazanan zaferin heyecanını kaybeder. - If the loser smiled the winner will lose the thrill of victory.

birinci

O, yarışı birinci bitirdiğinde, tüm ülke için bir zaferdi. - It was a victory for the whole country when he finished first in the race.

hugh of saint-victor
Saint-Victor ile hugh
indian male given name - meaning victor in wars
savaşlarda Hintli erkek isim - anlam kazanan
victors
zaferler
Englisch - Englisch
A male given name

'Well, it's you mother who chose Victor. I never liked the name. It sounded a bit like boasting. I think it was because you were born on May something or other when we celebrate the day Germans surrendered.' 'I wasn't. I was born in September.' 'Oh, then there must have been another reason. Perhaps she thought to have you at all was her victory. Over me. I wasn't so keen on a child.'.

The winner in a fight or contest
The letter V in the ICAO spelling alphabet
{n} one who gets the better, a conqueror
derived from a Late Latin personal name meaning "conqueror", borne by several saints
{i} male first name
a combatant who is able to defeat rivals
Victorious
The winner in a contest; one who gets the better of another in any struggle; esp
A destroyer
The victor in a battle or contest is the person who wins. the winner of a battle, game, competition etc (victus, past participle of vincere ). orig. Dauferi born 1027, Benevento, principality of Benevento died Sept. 16, 1087, Montecassino, principality of Capua; beatified July 23, 1887; feast day September 16 Pope (1086-87). As abbot of Monte Cassino from 1058, he promoted manuscript illumination, established a school of mosaic, and reconstructed the abbey. He served as papal vicar in southern Italy, negotiating peace between the Normans and the papacy. He was proclaimed pope against his will and was soon driven from Rome by supporters of Emperor Henry IV and the antipope Clement III. In 1087, after briefly retiring to his abbey, Victor resumed his papal authority and promoted the reforms of his predecessor, Pope Gregory VII. After sending an army to defeat the Saracens at Tunis (1087), he called a synod at Benevento and excommunicated Clement. He fell ill and returned to Monte Cassino, where he died. Berger Victor Louis Borge Victor Bourgeois Léon Victor Auguste Broglie Louis Victor Pierre-Raymond duke de Debs Eugene Victor Delacroix Ferdinand Eugène Victor Godfrey of Saint Victor Goldschmidt Victor Moritz Gollancz Sir Victor Herbert Victor August Hess Victor Francis Horta Victor Baron Hugh of Saint Victor Hugo Victor Marie Léopold Louis Philippe Marie Victor Pritchett Sir Victor Sawdon Saint Léon Charles Victor Arthur Michel Schally Andrew Victor Sjöström Victor Victor Seastrom Varèse Edgard Victor Achille Charles Vasarely Victor Victor Amadeus II Victor Emmanuel I Victor Emmanuel II Victor Emmanuel III Victor III Vigny Alfred Victor count de White Patrick Victor Martindale Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas prince of Battenberg
the contestant who wins the contest
{i} winner, conqueror, hero
Your football team's weekly opponent
VHF radio frequencies (118 to 138 MHz AM mode)
military phonetic for the letter 'V'
one who defeats an enemy in battle; a vanquisher; a conqueror; often followed by art, rarely by of
Victor Charlie
VC
Victor -Marie Hugo
born Feb. 26, 1802, Besançon, France died May 22, 1885, Paris French poet, dramatist, and novelist. The son of a general, he was an accomplished poet before age
Victor -Marie Hugo
With his verse drama Cromwell (1827), he emerged as an important figure in Romanticism. The production of his poetic tragedy Hernani (1830) was a victory for Romantics over traditional classicists in a well-known literary battle. His later plays included Le Roi s'amuse (1832) and Ruy Blas (1838). His best-known novels are The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), an evocation of medieval life, and Les Misérables (1862), the story of the convict Jean Valjean; their huge popularity made him at that time the most successful writer in the world. In later life he was a politician and political writer. He spent the years 1851-70 in exile for his republican views, producing his most extensive and original works, including Les Châtiments (1853), poems of political satire; Les Contemplations (1856); and the first installment of The Legend of the Centuries (1859, 1877, 1883). He was made a senator in 1876, and he was buried in the Panthéon as a national hero
Victor Amadeus
Italian Vittorio Amedeo born May 14, 1666, Turin, Savoy died Oct. 31, 1732, Moncalieri, near Turin King of Sicily (1713-20) and of Sardinia (1720-30). The son of Charles Emmanuel II, he inherited his father's title as duke of Savoy in 1675 and grew up under a regency headed by his mother, who pursued a pro-French policy. In the War of the Spanish Succession he sided with France, but in 1703 he shifted to the Habsburg side. With the French defeat at Turin (1706) he secured his position in Italy. The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) gave him the title of king of Sicily, which he was obliged to exchange for Sardinia in 1720. As the first king of Sardinia, which also included Piedmont and Savoy, he established the foundation for the future Italian national state
Victor August Herbert
born Feb. 1, 1859, Dublin, Ire. died May 26, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. Irish-born U.S. composer. After his widowed mother married a German doctor, he was raised in Stuttgart, and he studied at its conservatory. He married the soprano Therese Forrester in 1886, and they moved to the U.S., she to sing and he to play in the orchestra at the new Metropolitan Opera. He was soon active as a conductor, cellist, composer, and teacher. His solid training, orchestrating skill, and melodic gift found natural expression in more than 40 operettas, including Babes in Toyland (1903), Mlle Modiste (1905), The Red Mill (1906), and Naughty Marietta (1910)
Victor Baron Horta
born Jan. 6, 1861, Ghent, Belg. died Sept. 8, 1947, Brussels Belgian architect. From 1892 he designed numerous buildings in Brussels, becoming a leading exponent of the Art Nouveau style. His Hôtel Tassel (1892-93) was a pioneering example of the new style. His chief work was the Maison du Peuple (1896-99), the first structure in Belgium to have a largely iron-and-glass facade. From 1912 he directed the Académie des Beaux-Arts, and he designed the Palais des Beaux-Arts (1922-28)
Victor Berger
born Feb. 28, 1860, Nieder-Rehbach, Austria-Hungary died Aug. 7, 1929, Milwaukee, Wis., U.S. Cofounder of the U.S. Socialist Party. He immigrated to the U.S. from Austria-Hungary in 1878, founded a German-language newspaper in 1892, and edited the Social Democratic Herald (later Milwaukee Leader) from 1898 to 1929. With Eugene V. Debs he founded the Social Democratic Party, which became the Socialist Party in 1901. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1911-13) as the first Socialist ever elected to Congress. Elected again in 1918, he was denied his seat after being convicted under the Espionage Act for opposing U.S. participation in World War I. His conviction was overturned, and he again served in the House (1923-29) and succeeded Debs as Socialist Party chairman (1927-29)
Victor Borge
orig. Borge Rosenbaum born Jan. 3, 1909, Copenhagen, Den. died Dec. 23, 2000, Greenwich, Conn., U.S. Danish-born U.S. comedian and pianist. He studied at the Copenhagen Music Conservatory and later in Vienna and Berlin. Initially performing as a concert musician, he soon developed a style that combined comedy with classical music, and he toured throughout Europe. In 1940 he immigrated to the U.S., where he achieved fame appearing in various venues, including radio, films, concert halls, Broadway, and television. Though he performed as soloist and guest conductor with many of the world's leading orchestras, his significant pianistic talent was often overshadowed by his highly popular humour
Victor Emmanuel
Italian Vittorio Emanuele born July 24, 1759, Turin, Kingdom of Sardinia died Jan. 10, 1824, Moncalieri, near Turin King of Sardinia (1802-21). Son of Victor Amadeus III and great-grandson of Victor Amadeus II, he led Sardinian forces against the French (1792-97). He became duke of Savoy and king of Sardinia in 1802 when his brother Charles Emmanuel IV abdicated. His kingdom, except for the island of Sardinia, was occupied by France (1802-14), then restored with the addition of Genoa by the Congress of Vienna (1815). He abdicated in 1821 in favour of his brother Charles Felix (1765-1831). Italian Vittorio Emanuele born March 14, 1820, Turin, Piedmont, Kingdom of Sardinia died Jan. 9, 1878, Rome, Italy King of Sardinia (1849-61) and first king of a united Italy (1861-78). The son of Charles Albert, he took part in the war against Austria (1848) and became king when his father abdicated in 1849. Assisted by his minister Camillo Cavour, he strengthened the kingdom and supported the Risorgimento movement for unity. In the war with Austria (1859-61), he commanded troops to victories in the Battles of Magenta and Solferino. He secretly encouraged Giuseppe de Garibaldi in the conquest of Sicily and Naples and led the invasion of the Papal States. He assumed the title of king of Italy (1861) and later acquired Venetia (1866) and Rome (1870). Italian Vittorio Emanuele born Nov. 11, 1869, Naples, Italy died Dec. 28, 1947, Alexandria, Egypt King of Italy (1900-46). Son of Umberto I, he came suddenly to the throne on his father's assassination (1900). He accepted a Liberal cabinet and readily agreed to Italy's war against Turkey (1911-12) and entry into World War I. After the war, he failed to prevent the rise of Benito Mussolini and the fascist seizure of power, which turned him into a figurehead sovereign. In 1943, after disastrous Italian military losses and the Allied invasion of Sicily, he had Mussolini arrested and replaced by Pietro Badoglio as premier. In 1944 he relinquished power to his son Umberto and, in an unsuccessful attempt to preserve the monarchy, abdicated in Umberto's favour in 1946 (see Umberto II). When the Italian republic was declared in 1946, father and son went into exile
Victor Emmanuel II
Italian king (1861-1878). He completed the unification of Italy by acquiring Venice (1866) and Rome (1870)
Victor Emmanuel III
Italian king (1900-1946). He appointed Benito Mussolini prime minister in 1922 and did little to stop Italy's decline into a fascist state. He abdicated in 1946, and the monarchy was formally abolished in 1947
Victor Fleming
and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1941) (1883-1949), a US film director who won an Oscar as best director for Gone With the Wind in 1939. His other films included Captains Courageous (1937), The Wizard of Oz (1939)
Victor Francis Hess
born June 24, 1883, Waldstein, Styria, Austria died Dec. 17, 1964, Mount Vernon, N.Y., U.S. Austrian-born U.S. physicist. He received his doctorate from the University of Vienna in 1906. His research dealt chiefly with radioactivity and atmospheric electricity. His experiments proved what had long been suspected: an extremely penetrating radiation of extraterrestrial origin permeates the atmosphere (see cosmic ray). Further investigation of this radiation, named cosmic rays in 1925, led Carl D. Anderson (1905-91) to discover the positron and opened up new fields of research in modern physics. For this work, Hess and Anderson shared a Nobel Prize in 1936
Victor Herbert
born Feb. 1, 1859, Dublin, Ire. died May 26, 1924, New York, N.Y., U.S. Irish-born U.S. composer. After his widowed mother married a German doctor, he was raised in Stuttgart, and he studied at its conservatory. He married the soprano Therese Forrester in 1886, and they moved to the U.S., she to sing and he to play in the orchestra at the new Metropolitan Opera. He was soon active as a conductor, cellist, composer, and teacher. His solid training, orchestrating skill, and melodic gift found natural expression in more than 40 operettas, including Babes in Toyland (1903), Mlle Modiste (1905), The Red Mill (1906), and Naughty Marietta (1910)
Victor Hess
{i} Victor Franz Hess (1883-1964), Austrian-born American physicist, Nobel Prize winner in 1936
Victor Hugo
With his verse drama Cromwell (1827), he emerged as an important figure in Romanticism. The production of his poetic tragedy Hernani (1830) was a victory for Romantics over traditional classicists in a well-known literary battle. His later plays included Le Roi s'amuse (1832) and Ruy Blas (1838). His best-known novels are The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1831), an evocation of medieval life, and Les Misérables (1862), the story of the convict Jean Valjean; their huge popularity made him at that time the most successful writer in the world. In later life he was a politician and political writer. He spent the years 1851-70 in exile for his republican views, producing his most extensive and original works, including Les Châtiments (1853), poems of political satire; Les Contemplations (1856); and the first installment of The Legend of the Centuries (1859, 1877, 1883). He was made a senator in 1876, and he was buried in the Panthéon as a national hero
Victor Hugo
a French writer of poems, plays, and novels. Two of his most famous novels are The Hunchback of Notre Dame and Les Misérables (1802-85). born Feb. 26, 1802, Besançon, France died May 22, 1885, Paris French poet, dramatist, and novelist. The son of a general, he was an accomplished poet before age
Victor Hugo
(1802-1885) 19th century French author and poet, author of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" and "Les Miserables
Victor Louis Berger
born Feb. 28, 1860, Nieder-Rehbach, Austria-Hungary died Aug. 7, 1929, Milwaukee, Wis., U.S. Cofounder of the U.S. Socialist Party. He immigrated to the U.S. from Austria-Hungary in 1878, founded a German-language newspaper in 1892, and edited the Social Democratic Herald (later Milwaukee Leader) from 1898 to 1929. With Eugene V. Debs he founded the Social Democratic Party, which became the Socialist Party in 1901. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1911-13) as the first Socialist ever elected to Congress. Elected again in 1918, he was denied his seat after being convicted under the Espionage Act for opposing U.S. participation in World War I. His conviction was overturned, and he again served in the House (1923-29) and succeeded Debs as Socialist Party chairman (1927-29)
Victor Moritz Goldschmidt
born Jan. 27, 1888, Zürich, Switz. died March 20, 1947, Oslo, Nor. Swiss-born Norwegian mineralogist and petrologist. He became director of the Mineralogical Institute of the University of Kristiania (now Oslo) in 1914. The dearth of raw materials during World War I led Goldschmidt to research in geochemistry. His work in that area, and more general studies after the war, marks the beginnings of modern geochemistry. His Geochemical Laws of the Distribution of the Elements (8 vol., 1923-38) laid the foundations of inorganic crystal chemistry. During the 1930s he studied the relative cosmic abundance of the elements. In 1942 he escaped a Nazi concentration camp and fled to England; after the war he returned to Oslo
Victor Sjöström
or Victor Seastrom born Sept. 20, 1879, Silbodal, Swed. died Jan. 3, 1960, Stockholm Swedish film actor and director. Trained as a stage actor, he directed and starred in his first movie, The Gardener, in 1912. With notable films such as Ingeborg Holm (1913), The Outlaw and His Wife (1918), and The Phantom Carriage (1921), he established the artistic excellence of the Swedish silent film in the post-World War I era. In 1923 he moved to Hollywood, where he directed movies such as The Scarlet Letter (1926) and The Wind (1928). He returned to Sweden in 1930 and acted in numerous films, notably Ingmar Bergman's Wild Strawberries (1957). Sjöström's films are lyrically beautiful expressions of humanity's relationship to nature and to society
Victor Vasarely
v. orig. Viktor Vásárhelyi born April 9, 1908, Pécs, Hung. died March 15, 1997, Paris, France Hungarian French painter. Trained in Budapest in the Bauhaus tradition, he moved to Paris in 1930 and supported himself as a commercial artist. In the 1930s he was influenced by Constructivism, but by the 1940s he was painting animated surfaces of geometric forms and interacting colours. His style reached maturity in the mid 1950s and 1960s, with the use of more vibrant colours to increase the sense of movement through optical illusion, as in Sirius II (1954), and he became one of the leading figures of the Op art movement
Víctor Paz Estenssoro
born Oct. 2, 1907, Tarija, Bol. died June 7, 2001, Tarija President of Bolivia (1952-56, 1960-64, 1985-89). Originally an economics professor, he was elected to the Chamber of Deputies and then became president in 1952, when the National Revolutionary Movement (MNR), a left-wing organization that he helped found, seized power. He extended the vote to Indians, implemented agrarian reform, and expropriated three major tin companies. He was elected again in 1964 but was overthrown by a military coup the same year. He regained the presidency in 1985 and instituted a program of economic austerity that reduced the hyperinflation that had imperiled the Bolivian economy
Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre
born Feb. 22, 1895, Trujillo, Peru died Aug. 2, 1979, Lima Peruvian political theorist and activist. The son of wealthy parents, in 1914 he founded APRA, a left-of-centre reformist party. He ran for president repeatedly but was always thwarted by the military and other conservative forces. He spent much of his life in prison, exile, or hiding, influencing Peruvian politics through his underground activities and writings. See also indigenismo
victor emanuel ii
king of Italy who completed the unification of Italy by acquiring Venice and Rome (1820-1878)
victor emanuel iii
king of Italy who appointed Mussolini prime minister; he abdicated in 1946 and the monarchy was abolished (1869-1947)
to the victor go the spoils
The winner of a conflict wins additional benefits, beyond just the subject of the conflict
Alfred-Victor count de Vigny
v. born March 27, 1797, Loches, France died Sept. 17, 1863, Paris French poet, dramatist, and novelist. Vigny embarked on a military career but turned to writing Romantic poetry; his verse was critically and popularly acclaimed. His Cinq-Mars (1826) was the first important historical novel in French. Growing disillusioned, he wrote Stello (1832), on the advisability of separating the poetic life from the political. Chatterton (1835), his best play and one of the finest Romantic dramas, glorifies the anguish of the misunderstood artist. His pessimism was manifest also in The Military Necessity (1835), whose first and third stories are his prose masterpieces. In middle age he withdrew from Paris society. His later writings include poetry collected posthumously in Les Destinées (1864)
Andrew Victor Schally
v. born Nov. 20, 1926, Wilno, Pol. Polish-born U.S. endocrinologist. His family fled Poland in 1939, and he received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from McGill University in 1957. He shared a 1977 Nobel Prize for his work with Roger C.L. Guillemin and Rosalyn Yalow in isolating and synthesizing hormones produced by the hypothalamus
Edgard -Victor-Achille-Charles Varèse
born Dec. 22, 1883, Paris, France died Nov. 8, 1965, New York, N.Y., U.S. French-born U.S. composer. Forbidden to study music by his father, he secretly continued his studies and entered the Schola Cantorum with the help of his cousin, the pianist Alfred Cortot (1877-1962). He soon moved to Berlin, where he met Ferruccio Busoni and Richard Strauss, musicians in tune with his forward-looking ideas. His Bourgogne (1907) caused a scandal because of its dissonance. His budding conducting career was interrupted by World War I, and he moved to the U.S. In 1921 he cofounded the International Composers Guild. His output was small, but every piece became a classic, including Offrandes, Amériques (both 1921), Hyperprism, Octandre (both 1923), Arcana (1927), and Ionisation (1931), works remarkable for the way they used instruments, especially percussion, to create blocks of sound. After the early 1950s, when he finally gained access to the electronic sound equipment he desired, he concentrated on electronic music
Eugene Victor Debs
born Nov. 5, 1855, Terre Haute, Ind., U.S. died Oct. 20, 1926, Elmhurst, Ill. U.S. labour organizer. Debs left home at age 14 to work in the railroad shops. As a locomotive fireman, he became an early advocate of industrial unionism, and he became president of the American Railway Union in 1893. His involvement in the Pullman Strike led to a six-month prison term in 1895. In 1898 he helped found the U.S. Socialist Party; he would run as its presidential candidate five times (1900-20). In 1905 he helped found the Industrial Workers of the World. Debs was charged with sedition in 1918 after denouncing the 1917 Espionage Act; he conducted his last presidential campaign from prison, winning 915,000 votes before being released by presidential order in 1921
Ferdinand Victor Eugene Delacroix
{i} Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863), French Romantic painter and lithographer, creator of "The Bark of Dante" and "Women of Algiers
Ferdinand- Eugène -Victor Delacroix
born April 26, 1798, Charenton-Saint-Maurice, France died Aug. 13, 1863, Paris French painter. As a young man he was strongly influenced by the Romanticism of the painter Théodore Géricault and the Polish-born composer and pianist Frédéric Chopin. In 1822 he exhibited the painting Dante and Virgil in Hell, a landmark in the development of French 19th-century Romanticism. In his subsequent choice of subjects, Delacroix often showed an affinity with Lord Byron and other Romantic poets of his time. His work was characterized by an uninhibited expression of energy and movement, a fascination with violence, destruction, and the more tragic aspects of life, and a sensuous use of colour. After his success at the Paris Salon, he was commissioned to decorate government buildings; he became one of the most distinguished monumental mural painters in the history of French art. He explored the new medium of lithography and in 1827 executed 17 lithographs for an edition of Faust. In 1830 he painted Liberty Leading the People to commemorate the July Revolution that brought Louis-Philippe to the French throne. His use of colour influenced the development of Impressionism
Godfrey of Saint-Victor
born 1125 died 1194, Paris French monk, philosopher, theologian, and poet. About 1160 Godfrey entered the monastery of Saint-Victor in Paris. He left after 20 years for a rural priory, where he wrote his principal work, Microcosmus, an attempt to systematize history and knowledge into a rational structure. Recalling Classical philosophy and that of the early Church Fathers, it asserts that mankind is a microcosm containing the material and spiritual elements of reality. In his other notable work, The Fount of Philosophy ( 1176), he proposed a classification of learning. His writings are considered prime examples of 12th-century humanism
Hugh of Saint-Victor
born 1096 died Feb. 11, 1141, Paris, Fr. Scholastic theologian who began the tradition of mysticism of the school of St.-Victor, Paris. He was influenced by St. Augustine of Hippo and by Dionysius the Areopagite and contributed to the development of natural theology. His theology anticipated some of the works of St. Thomas Aquinas
Japan Victor Company
{i} JVC, Victor Company of Japan, large international corporation headquartered in Yokohama (Japan), producer of audio and video electronic equipment and consumer electronics products
Louis-Victor duke de Broglie
born Aug. 15, 1892, Dieppe, France died March 19, 1987, Paris French physicist. A descendant of the de Broglie family of diplomats and politicians, he was inspired to study atomic physics by the work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein. In his doctoral thesis he described his theory of electron waves, then extended the wave-particle duality theory of light to matter. He is noted both for his discovery of the wave nature of electrons and for his research on quantum theory. Einstein built on de Broglie's idea of "matter-waves"; based on this work, Erwin Schrödinger constructed the system of wave mechanics. De Broglie remained at the Sorbonne after 1924 and taught theoretical physics at the Henri Poincaré Institute (1928-62). He was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1929 and UNESCO's Kalinga Prize in 1952
Louis-Victor -Pierre-Raymond duke de Broglie
born Aug. 15, 1892, Dieppe, France died March 19, 1987, Paris French physicist. A descendant of the de Broglie family of diplomats and politicians, he was inspired to study atomic physics by the work of Max Planck and Albert Einstein. In his doctoral thesis he described his theory of electron waves, then extended the wave-particle duality theory of light to matter. He is noted both for his discovery of the wave nature of electrons and for his research on quantum theory. Einstein built on de Broglie's idea of "matter-waves"; based on this work, Erwin Schrödinger constructed the system of wave mechanics. De Broglie remained at the Sorbonne after 1924 and taught theoretical physics at the Henri Poincaré Institute (1928-62). He was awarded a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1929 and UNESCO's Kalinga Prize in 1952
Patrick Victor Martindale White
v. born May 28, 1912, London, Eng. died Sept. 30, 1990, Sydney, N.S.W., Austrl. Australian writer. As a youth White moved between Australia and England, where he attended Cambridge University. After serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, he returned to Australia, which he saw as a country in a volatile process of growth and self-definition. His somewhat misanthropic novels often explore the possibilities of savagery in that context; they include The Tree of Man (1955), Voss (1957), Riders in the Chariot (1961), and The Twyborn Affair (1979). His other works include plays and short stories, the latter collected in The Burnt Ones (1964) and The Cockatoos (1974). He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1973
Sir Victor Gollancz
v. born April 9, 1893, London, Eng. died Feb. 8, 1967, London British publisher, writer, and humanitarian. Born to a family of orthodox Jews, Gollancz evolved a religious outlook strongly influenced by Christian ethics. In 1928 he founded the publishing firm of Victor Gollancz, Ltd., issuing best-sellers and works supporting his favoured causes, including social welfare, pacifism, and abolition of capital punishment. Through the Left Book Club, which he founded in 1936, he worked against fascism, and after World War II he led relief efforts
Sir Victor Sawdon Pritchett
v. born Dec. 16, 1900, Ipswich, Suffolk, Eng. died March 20, 1997, London British novelist, short-story writer, and critic. A full-time journalist from 1922 and a literary critic for the New Statesman (1928-65), Pritchett became known for his perceptive essays and reviews and for his penetrating and finely crafted short stories. His collections, which offer lively, ironic portraits of middle-class life, include You Make Your Own Life (1938), Blind Love (1969), and A Careless Widow (1989). He also wrote novels, travel books, and the admired memoirs A Cab at the Door (1968) and Midnight Oil (1971)
prince of Battenberg Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas
orig. Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas, prince of Battenberg born June 25, 1900, Frogmore House, Windsor, Eng. died Aug. 27, 1979, Donegal Bay, off Mullaghmore, County Sligo, Ire. British statesman and naval commander. Son of Prince Louis of Battenberg and great-grandson of Queen Victoria, he entered the Royal Navy in 1913 and became an aide to the prince of Wales in 1921. In World War II he was allied commander for Southeast Asia (1943-46) and directed the recapture of Burma. Appointed viceroy of India (1947), he administered the transfer of power from Britain to the independent nations of India and Pakistan and served as the first governor-general of India (1947-48). He became first sea lord (1955-59) and chief of the United Kingdom Defense Staff (1959-65). In 1979, while on a sailing visit to Ireland, he was assassinated by Irish terrorists who planted a bomb on his boat
victors
plural of victor
victor
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