synecdoche

listen to the pronunciation of synecdoche
Englisch - Türkisch
bir kavramı daha dar veya daha geniş anlamda başka bir kavramla ifade etme usulü
(Dilbilim) kapsamlayış
kapsamlama
(Dilbilim) Bir kavramı daha dar veya daha geniş anlamda başka bir kavramla ifade etme usulü, meslâ Türk ordusu yerine Mehmetçik, vişne şurubu yerine vişne demek gibi
(isim) dar anlamlı bir sözcüğü geniş anlamda kullanma
{i} dar anlamlı bir sözcüğü geniş anlamda kullanma
san
(Dilbilim) ad aktarması
Englisch - Englisch
The use of synecdoche; synecdochy
A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole, the whole for a part, the species for the genus, the genus for the species, or the name of the material for the thing made, and similar
{n} a part taken or put for the whole
A figure of speech in which a part of something stands for the whole or the whole for a part, as wheels for automobile or society for high society Sidelight: Synecdoche is so similar in meaning to metonymy that the latter term is often used for both (Compare Metaphor, Simile, Symbol)
referring to something by just a part of it "New York won the World Series," instead of "The New York Yankees won the World Series " See also: metonymy
- a type of metaphor in which part of something is used to signify the whole Less often, it can also occur when the whole of something is used to signify a part
A figure of speech putting part for the whole, or the whole for part
Referring to a concept by a part of it "All of the big names in the field were there " See also metonymy
substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
A figure or trope by which a part of a thing is put for the whole (as, fifty sail for fifty ships), or the whole for a part (as, the smiling year for spring), the species for the genus (as, cutthroat for assassin), the genus for the species (as, a creature for a man), the name of the material for the thing made, etc
A figure of speech involving the use of a narrower or a more general term to designate something, e g "a sail!" meaning "a ship!" (see also metonymy)
A part of something substituted for the whole Meaning is inferred by the specific part used Ex: "A nice set of wheels "
literary device in which the part represents the whole (e g "the crown rules our fair land" -- it is the king, not the crown)
{i} figure of speech in which a part is used to represent the whole or the whole for the part (i.e. "wheels" for "car")
Synecdoche is from the Greek word [synekdechesthai], taken from the root words [syn] meaning 'together' or 'joined,' [ek] meaning 'out of', and [dechesthai] meaning to receive Thus the word indicates 'receiving out of that which is together ' By implication, it simply means to 'receive out of the whole ' One is using a Synecdoche when they speak of 'a part of something,' but are referring to the whole thing For example, if someone says they need 'some wheels to get to New York,' the word wheels is a synecdoche meaning a car
a figure of speech where the part stands for the whole (for example, "I've got wheels" for "I have a car") One expression that combines synecdoche and metonymy (in which a word normally associated with something is substituted for the term usually naming that thing) is "boob tube," meaning "television "
Using a part of something to demonstrate or stand for the whole, or using the whole to demonstrate or stand for a part Examples: The poem Negro uses references of I somewheat as a part instead of a whole population (Hughes, p 581) "First fight Then fiddle " Here fiddle is possibly rejoice or having happiness or peace (Brooks, p 723) T -back to top-
Figurative language in which a part of something stands for the whole to give an other than literal meaning; Green Bay doesn't play St Louis, but their football teams do
a kind of connotation in which a part is used for the whole (as hand for sailor)
a figure of speech that uses the part to stand for the whole, or the whole to stand for the part
A metaphor by which an inclusive term stands for something included, or vice versa; a metaphor in which a part is spoken of as the whole (hand for laborer) or vice-versa (the court for the judge)
A figure of speech in which a part is used to designate the whole or the whole is used to designate a part For example, the phrase “all hands on deck” means “all men on deck,” not just their hands The reverse situation, in which the whole is used for a part, occurs in the sentence “The U S beat Russia in the final game,” where the U S and Russia stand for “the U S team” and “the Russian team,” respectively
synecdochic
using an inclusive term for something included, or vice versa; using something spoken of as the whole (hand for laborer) or vice-versa (the court for the judge)
synecdochic
using the name of a part for that of the whole or the whole for the part; or the special for the general or the general for the special; or the material for the thing made of it; "to use `hand' for `worker' or `ten sail' for `ten ships' or `steel' for `sword' is to use a synecdochic figure of speech
synecdoche

    Silbentrennung

    syn·ec·do·che

    Synonyme

    pars pro toto

    Aussprache

    Etymologie

    [ s&-'nek-d&-(")kE ] (noun.) 15th century. From Latin synecdoche, from Ancient Greek συνεκδοχή (sunekdokhe, “receiving together”).

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