smith

listen to the pronunciation of smith
Englisch - Türkisch
{i} demirci, demir eşya yapan/onaran kimse
demirci

Demirci kendi demir ocağında çalışıyor. - The smith is working at his forge.

Cüceler büyük demircidir. - The dwarves are great smiths.

{i} nalbant
nalbant/demirci
smithydemirhane
nalbanthane
demirci ustası
etika
smith sound
smith ses
smith's forge
(Endüstri) demirbaş ocağı
smith's tongs
demirci kıskacı
John Smith
alelade adam
family name
soyadı

Soyadınızın yazılışı nasıl? - What's the spelling of your family name?

Çin'de önce soyadımızı sonra adımızı koyarız. - In China, we put our family name first, then our name.

black smith
siyah smith
john smith
Alelade adam, herhangi bir kimse
lock smith
kilit smith
margaret chase smith
margaret takip smith
margaret smith court
margaret smith mahkeme
smiths
demircileri
will smith
smith olacak
brass smith
pirinççi
cari smith disease
(Tıp) carl smith hastalığı
family name
aile adı

Watanabe benim aile adımdır. - Watanabe is my family name.

Aile adın nasıl yazılır? - How is your family name written?

jane smith
kadıncağız
Englisch - Englisch
An English surname (the most common in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand)

John is a most excellent name, and Smith is a surname which is worthy of respect and honor, but wo to the man on whom they are conjoined! For John Smith to aspire to senatorial dignities or to the laurel of a poet is simply ridiculous. Who is John Smith? He is lost in the multitude of John Smiths, and individual fame is impossible.

An artist
A craftsperson who works metal into desired forms using a hammer and other tools, sometimes heating the metal to make it more workable, especially a blacksmith
{n} one who works in metals or forges
{i} family name
An English surname (the most common in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand); derived from the trade name smith
American singer and songwriter who became a leading blues performer in the 1920s and made nearly 200 recordings, often with musicians such as Louis Armstrong and Benny Goodman. Scottish political economist and philosopher. His Wealth of Nations (1776) laid the foundations of classical free-market economic theory. American suffragist. With her sister Abby Hadassah Smith (1797-1878) she became famous for refusing to pay taxes until she could vote. American singer noted especially for her rendition of Irving Berlin's "God Bless America," first performed in 1938. American politician who served as U.S. representative (1940-1949) and senator (1949-1973) from Maine. British-born Canadian biochemist who developed a method for making a specific genetic mutation at any spot on a DNA molecule. He shared a 1993 Nobel Prize in chemistry. American politician. He served as governor of New York (1919-1920 and 1923-1928) and was defeated in the 1928 presidential election by Herbert Hoover. American sculptor best known for his use of scrap and welded metal, especially in Medals of Dishonor (1940), a series of bronze relief plaques which depict his opposition to violence and greed. American microbiologist. He shared a 1978 Nobel Prize for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to molecular genetics. American evangelist, writer, and reformer who was a founder of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (1874). Zimbabwean politician who unilaterally declared independence from Great Britain for the former colony of Rhodesia in 1965. American trader and explorer who opened a number of trade routes throughout the West. English colonist, explorer, and writer whose maps and accounts of his explorations in Virginia and New England were invaluable to later explorers and colonists. American religious leader. He founded (1830) the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and led his congregation westward from New York State to western Illinois, where he was murdered by an anti-Mormon mob. someone who makes and repairs things made of iron = blacksmith. Abigail Smith Birkenhead Frederick Edwin Smith 1st earl of Court Margaret Smith Margaret Smith Derby Edward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley 14th earl of Kuznets Simon Smith Lula Carson Smith William Smith Monroe O'Brien William Smith Patton George Smith Gladys Mary Smith Harold Smith Prince Smith & Wesson Smith College Smith Sound Smith Adam Smith Alfred Emanuel Smith Bessie Elizabeth Smith Smith Cyril Stanley Smith Dame Maggie Margaret Natalie Smith Smith David Roland Smith Emmitt Smith George Smith Gerrit Smith Hamilton Othanel Smith Hoke Smith Ian Douglas Smith John Smith Joseph Smith Kate Kathryn Elizabeth Smith Smith Margaret Chase Smith Red Walter Wellesley Smith Smith Samuel Smith Stevie Florence Margaret Smith Smith Theobald Smith William Eugene Smith William Stephens Uriah Smith Surtees Robert Smith Kate Douglas Smith
someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable)
United States suffragist who refused to pay taxes until she could vote (1792-1886)
A proper name (See Brewer )
{i} metal worker; blacksmith
United States blues singer (1894-1937)
Scottish economist who advocated private enterprise and free trade (1723-1790)
One who makes or effects anything
Rhodesian statesman who declared independence of Zimbabwe from Great Britain (born in 1919)
United States sculptor (1906-1965)
A craftsperson who works metal into desired forms using a hammer and other tools, sometimes heating the metal to make it more workable
someone who works at something specified
United States singer noted for her rendition of patriotic songs (1909-1986)
and Ragan: The systematic process of translating principles of learning and instruction into plans for instructional materials and activities
someone who works metal (especially by hammering it when it is hot and malleable) someone who works at something specified Scottish economist who advocated private enterprise and free trade (1723-1790) English explorer who helped found the colony at Jamestown, Virginia; was said to have been saved by Pocahontas (1580-1631) religious leader who founded the Mormon Church in 1830 (1805-1844) United States blues singer (1894-1937) United States suffragist who refused to pay taxes until she could vote (1792-1886) United States singer noted for her rendition of patriotic songs (1909-1986) United States sculptor (1906-1965) Rhodesian statesman who declared independence of Zimbabwe from Great Britain (born in 1919)
religious leader who founded the Mormon Church in 1830 (1805-1844)
To beat into shape; to forge
English explorer who helped found the colony at Jamestown, Virginia; was said to have been saved by Pocahontas (1580-1631)
One who forges with the hammer; one who works in metals; as, a blacksmith, goldsmith, silversmith, and the like
henceforth
Smith & Wesson
U.S. gun manufacturer. The company has its roots in an 1852 partnership between Horace Smith (1808-93) and Daniel B. Wesson (1825-1906), who designed and marketed a lever-action, repeating magazine handgun that held a self-contained cartridge. Their venture ran into financial difficulties and they were forced to sell it, but a second partnership in 1856, manufacturing their new revolving-cylinder handgun (now known as the .22 rimfire) proved more successful. The Civil War made Smith & Wesson a leading firearms manufacturer. In 1867 it began selling in Europe. It supplied the British in World War I and the Allies in World War II. In 1965 the Wesson family sold the company, which has since changed hands several times
Smith & Wesson
American company based in Springfield Massachusetts (USA), manufacturer of firearms and law enforcement equipment
Smith College
Private liberal arts college for women in Northampton, Mass. It was founded in 1871 through the bequest of Sophia Smith (1796-1870). Bachelor's degrees are granted in most major academic fields, and master's degrees are granted in biology, dance, education, music, religion, social work, and theatre. Smith's school of social work also grants doctoral degrees. The college belongs to a five-college cooperative with Amherst, Hampshire, and Mount Holyoke colleges and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Smith College
{i} largest college for women located in Northampton (Massachusetts, USA)
Smith Sound
Channel between Ellesmere Island, Canada, and northwestern Greenland. About 30-45 mi (48-72 km) wide, the sound extends northward for 55 mi (88 km) from Baffin Bay to the Kane Basin. It was discovered by William Baffin in 1616 and named for Thomas Smythe (Smith), who had promoted a number of voyages searching for a Northwest Passage
Smith Square
the place in London where Central Office, the headquarters of the Conservative Party, is based
Smith Wesson
{i} Smith & Wesson, American company based in Springfield Massachusetts (USA), manufacturer of firearms and law enforcement equipment
Smith and Wesson
a type of handgun
-smith
Used to form occupational surnames mostly derived from the above
-smith
Used to form nouns relating to occupations involving the manufacture of certain items
Granny Smith
A green apple originating from Australia
Adam Smith
a Scottish economist who strongly believed in free enterprise (=an economic system in which private businesses are free to make money, and there is not much government control) .He developed his ideas in his book The Wealth of Nations, which has had an important influence on modern economic and political ideas (1723-90). (baptized June 5, 1723, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scot. died July 17, 1790, Edinburgh) Scottish social philosopher and political economist. The son of a customs official, he studied at the Universities of Glasgow and Oxford. A series of public lectures in Edinburgh (from 1748) led to a lifelong friendship with David Hume and to Smith's appointment to the Glasgow faculty in 1751. After publishing The Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759), he became the tutor of the future Duke of Buccleuch (1763-66); with him he traveled to France, where Smith consorted with other eminent thinkers. In 1776, after nine years of work, Smith published An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, the first comprehensive system of political economy. In it he argued in favour of an economic system based on individual self-interest that would be led, as if by an "invisible hand," to achieve the greatest good for all, and posited the division of labour as the chief factor in economic growth. A reaction to the system of mercantilism then current, it stands as the beginning of classical economics. The Wealth of Nations in time won him an enormous reputation and would become virtually the most influential work on economics ever published. Though often regarded as the bible of capitalism, it is harshly critical of the shortcomings of unrestrained free enterprise and monopoly. In 1777 Smith was appointed commissioner of customs for Scotland, and in 1787 rector of the University of Glasgow
Adam Smith
{i} (1723-1790) Scottish philosopher and political economist (advocator of free market economy)
Adam Smith Institute
a right-wing British organization that develops ideas about economics and gives advice to businesses and politicians. It is named after Adam Smith, an 18th century Scottish writer on economics
Alfred E Smith
born Dec. 30, 1873, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 4, 1944, New York City U.S. politician. After working in the Fulton fish market to help support his family, he began his political career with a job from Tammany Hall (1895). In the state assembly (1903-15), he rose to speaker, then served in city political posts. As governor of New York (1919-20, 1923-28) he worked for improved housing, child welfare, and efficient government. In 1928 he won the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party, the first Roman Catholic to do so, but he was easily defeated by Herbert Hoover. He later opposed the New Deal programs of Franklin D. Roosevelt and supported Republican presidential candidates for president in 1936 and 1940
Alfred Emanuel Smith
born Dec. 30, 1873, New York, N.Y., U.S. died Oct. 4, 1944, New York City U.S. politician. After working in the Fulton fish market to help support his family, he began his political career with a job from Tammany Hall (1895). In the state assembly (1903-15), he rose to speaker, then served in city political posts. As governor of New York (1919-20, 1923-28) he worked for improved housing, child welfare, and efficient government. In 1928 he won the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party, the first Roman Catholic to do so, but he was easily defeated by Herbert Hoover. He later opposed the New Deal programs of Franklin D. Roosevelt and supported Republican presidential candidates for president in 1936 and 1940
Bessie Smith
a US blues singer who was very popular in the 1920s, and whose style influenced many later musicians. Many people know the story of how she died after a car crash, when she was not allowed to enter a hospital for white people because she was black (1895-1937). orig. Elizabeth Smith born April 15, 1898?, Chattanooga, Tenn., U.S. died Sept. 26, 1937, Clarksdale, Miss. U.S. blues and jazz singer. Smith sang popular songs as well as blues on the minstrel and vaudeville stage. She began recording in 1923 and appeared in the film St. Louis Blues (1929). Her interpretations represent the fully realized transition of the rural folk tradition of the blues to its urbane structure and expressiveness. A bold, supremely confident artist with a powerful voice and precise diction, she became known as "Empress of the Blues." Smith was the most successful African American entertainer of her time. She died from injuries sustained in a car crash, and it was said that, had she been white, she would have received earlier medical treatment and her life might have been saved; the actual circumstances of her treatment remain obscure
Cyril Stanley Smith
born Oct. 4, 1903, Birmingham, Warwickshire, Eng. died Aug. 25, 1992, Cambridge, Mass., U.S. British-born U.S. metallurgist. He worked as a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the American Brass Co. before joining the Manhattan Project, where he determined the properties and technology of plutonium and uranium, the essential materials of the atomic bomb. He later taught at the University of Chicago (1946-61) and MIT (1961-69). He published many books on the history of metallurgy, including A History of Metallography (1960)
Dame Maggie Smith
orig. Margaret Natalie Smith born Dec. 28, 1934, Ilford, Essex, Eng. British actress. She first gained recognition on Broadway in New Faces of 1956, and, after winning praise for her roles in The Rehearsal (1961) and Mary, Mary (1963), she joined Britain's National Theatre Company, where she starred opposite Laurence Olivier in Othello (1964; film, 1965). Her later films include The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969, Academy Award), Travels with My Aunt (1972), California Suite (1978, Academy Award), and The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987). Known for her nervous intensity, acid wit, and flawless timing, she has many great stage performances to her credit, notably in The Way of the World (1985) and Lettice and Lovage (1990, Tony Award)
David Roland Smith
born March 9, 1906, Decatur, Ind., U.S. died May 23, 1965, Albany, N.Y. U.S. sculptor. He learned to work with metal while employed at an automobile plant. In 1926 he went to New York City and took various jobs while studying painting at the Art Students League. His sculptures grew out of his abstract paintings, to which he attached so many bits of wood, metal, and found objects that they became virtual bases for sculptural superstructures. He became the first U.S. artist to make welded metal sculpture. In 1940 he moved to Bolton Landing, N.Y., and there made his large yet seemingly weightless metal sculptures until his death in a car crash. His abstract biomorphic and geometric forms are remarkable for their erratic inventiveness, stylistic diversity, and high aesthetic quality. His work greatly influenced Minimalist sculpture in the 1960s
David Smith
born March 9, 1906, Decatur, Ind., U.S. died May 23, 1965, Albany, N.Y. U.S. sculptor. He learned to work with metal while employed at an automobile plant. In 1926 he went to New York City and took various jobs while studying painting at the Art Students League. His sculptures grew out of his abstract paintings, to which he attached so many bits of wood, metal, and found objects that they became virtual bases for sculptural superstructures. He became the first U.S. artist to make welded metal sculpture. In 1940 he moved to Bolton Landing, N.Y., and there made his large yet seemingly weightless metal sculptures until his death in a car crash. His abstract biomorphic and geometric forms are remarkable for their erratic inventiveness, stylistic diversity, and high aesthetic quality. His work greatly influenced Minimalist sculpture in the 1960s
Delia Smith
a British woman who writes books and makes very popular television programmes that teach people how to cook. Her books are among the most popular books sold in the UK, and people often simply call her 'Delia' (1941- )
Edward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley 14th earl of Derby
born March 29, 1799, Knowsley Park, Lancashire, Eng. died Oct. 23, 1869, London English statesman. Having entered Parliament as a Whig in 1820, he later joined the Conservatives and became leader of the Conservative Party (1846-68) and prime minister (1852, 1858, and 1866-68). Legislation adopted during his tenure included the removal of Jewish discrimination in Parliament membership, the transfer of India's administration from the East India Company to the crown, and the Reform Bill of 1867. He is remembered as one of England's greatest parliamentary orators
Emmitt Smith
born May 15, 1969, Pensacola, Fla., U.S. U.S. football player. He set 58 school football records at the University of Florida, and as a running back for the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL since 1990, he helped his team win three Super Bowl games. In 1995 he set the all-time NFL record for touchdowns in a single season (25), and he holds the record for most career rushing touchdowns (125). In 2002 he surpassed Walter Paytonto become the NFL's all-time leading rusher
Frederick Edwin Smith 1st earl of Birkenhead
born July 12, 1872, Birkenhead, Cheshire, Eng. died Sept. 30, 1930, London British politician. Elected to the House of Commons in 1906, he became noted as an orator and soon became a leader of the Conservative Party. As attorney general (1915-18), he successfully prosecuted Roger Casement. As lord chancellor (1919-22), he secured passage of the Law of Property Act (1922) and subsequent real-property statutes (1925) that replaced a convoluted system of land law. He also helped negotiate the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921
George Smith
born March 19, 1824, London, Eng. died April 6, 1901, Byfleet, near Weybridge, Surrey British publisher. He took over his father's bookselling and publishing business in 1846. Under his leadership the firm issued works by such noted Victorian writers as John Ruskin, the Brontë sisters, Charles Darwin, William Thackeray, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Wilkie Collins, Matthew Arnold, Harriet Martineau, and Anthony Trollope. His most important publication was the first edition of the Dictionary of National Biography, 66 vol. (1885-1901), later continued by Oxford University Press. He also began the illustrated literary journal Cornhill Magazine (1860) and the Pall Mall Gazette (1865), a literary newspaper
George Smith Patton
a US army general who was one of the most important US military leaders in World War II, and was known as "Old Blood and Guts" (1885-1945). born Nov. 11, 1885, San Gabriel, Calif., U.S. died Dec. 21, 1945, Heidelberg, Ger. U.S. army officer. He graduated from West Point and fought in World War I with the newly formed tank corps. He was later promoted to major general and given command of the 2nd Armored Division (1940). In World War II he led military operations in Morocco (1942) and Sicily (1943) and then commanded the 3rd Army in its sweep across northern France (1944) into Germany (1945). His strategy of bold and highly mobile operations in tank warfare, coupled with his strict, highly disciplined leadership, earned him his troops' respect and the nickname "Old Blood-and-Guts." Criticized for striking a hospitalized soldier he suspected of malingering, he later publicly apologized. He died in a car crash in Germany. See also Battle of the Bulge
Gerrit Smith
born March 6, 1797, Utica, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 28, 1874, New York, N.Y. U.S. reformer and philanthropist. Born into a wealthy family, he became active in the temperance movement (1828) and built one of the first U.S. temperance hotels at Peterboro, N.Y. From 1835 he was an active abolitionist, and he made his hotel a stop on the Underground Railroad. He helped form the Liberty Party and was its unsuccessful presidential candidate in 1848 and 1852. He paid the legal expenses of many slaves arrested under the Fugitive Slave Acts. He gave a farm to his friend John Brown and financed some of Brown's activities
Hamilton O Smith
born Aug. 23, 1931, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. microbiologist. He received his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University. While studying the mechanism whereby the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae takes up DNA from a particular bacteriophage, Smith, Werner Arber, and Daniel Nathans discovered the first of what came to be called type II restriction enzymes. Whereas previously studied restriction enzymes cut DNA at unpredictable points, the type II enzymes' predictability allowed the scientists to cut DNA at a particular point. The enzymes have become valuable tools in the study of DNA structure and in recombinant DNA technology. The three shared a 1978 Nobel Prize
Hamilton Othanel Smith
born Aug. 23, 1931, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. microbiologist. He received his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University. While studying the mechanism whereby the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae takes up DNA from a particular bacteriophage, Smith, Werner Arber, and Daniel Nathans discovered the first of what came to be called type II restriction enzymes. Whereas previously studied restriction enzymes cut DNA at unpredictable points, the type II enzymes' predictability allowed the scientists to cut DNA at a particular point. The enzymes have become valuable tools in the study of DNA structure and in recombinant DNA technology. The three shared a 1978 Nobel Prize
Hoke Smith
born Sept. 2, 1855, Newton, N.C., U.S. died Nov. 27, 1931, Atlanta, Ga. U.S. politician. He was publisher of the Atlanta Journal (1887-1900), which he used to promote progressive measures (except civil rights for African Americans). He served as U.S. secretary of the interior (1893-96). As governor of Georgia (1907-09, 1911), he improved education, transportation, and prison conditions. Elected to the U.S. Senate (1911-21), he supported progressive legislation but opposed U.S. participation in the League of Nations
Ian Douglas Smith
born April 8, 1919, Selukwe, Rhodesia First native-born prime minister of the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (1964-65). An ardent advocate of white rule, in 1965 he declared Rhodesia's independence and withdrew it from the Commonwealth. He faced guerrilla attacks from Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo through most of the 1970s. In 1977 he was finally compelled to negotiate a transfer of power to the black majority, a process completed two years later. He continued to serve in Parliament until 1987
Ian Smith
the Prime Minister of Rhodesia from 1964 to 1978. He made Rhodesia independent of the UK without British agreement, with a government of only white people, although most people in the country were black. Zimbabwe (1919- ). born April 8, 1919, Selukwe, Rhodesia First native-born prime minister of the British colony of Southern Rhodesia (1964-65). An ardent advocate of white rule, in 1965 he declared Rhodesia's independence and withdrew it from the Commonwealth. He faced guerrilla attacks from Robert Mugabe and Joshua Nkomo through most of the 1970s. In 1977 he was finally compelled to negotiate a transfer of power to the black majority, a process completed two years later. He continued to serve in Parliament until 1987
James Todd Smith
{i} L L Cool J, Ladies Love Cool James (born 1968), American rap musician and film actor
John Smith
(baptized Jan. 6, 1580, Willoughby, Lincolnshire, Eng. died June 1631, London) English explorer. After a period as a military adventurer, he joined an English group preparing to establish a colony in North America. After the London Co. received its charter, the group set sail and arrived at Chesapeake Bay (1607), establishing the first permanent English settlement in North America at Jamestown, of which Smith became the leader. On a river voyage to explore the surrounding region, he was captured by Indians of the Powhatan Confederacy; he was saved from death by Pocahontas. As president of the Jamestown colony, he oversaw its expansion. An injury forced his return to England in 1609. Eager for further exploration, he made contact with the Plymouth Co. and sailed in 1614 to the area he named New England. He mapped the coast and wrote descriptions of Virginia and New England that encouraged others to colonize
John Smith
{i} Captain John Smith (1580-1631), English explorer and co-founder of the colony at Jamestown in Virginia (USA) who was saved by Pocahontas
Joseph Smith
a US religious leader who started the Mormon religion. He described how an angel showed him where two golden tablets (=flat pieces of metal with words cut into them) were buried in a hill in the state of New York. He translated the writing on the tablets and it became the Book of Mormon, the holy book of the Mormon religion (1805-44). born Dec. 23, 1805, Sharon, Vt., U.S. died June 27, 1844, Carthage, Ill. Founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon church). He began experiencing visions as a teenager in Palmyra, N.Y. In 1827 he claimed that an angel had directed him to buried golden plates containing God's revelation; these he translated into the Book of Mormon (1830). He led converts to Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, where he established the town of Nauvoo (1839), which soon became the state's largest town. Imprisoned for treason after his efforts to silence Mormon dissenters led to mob violence, he was murdered by a lynch mob that stormed the jail where he was held. His work was continued by Brigham Young
Jr. Walker Smith
His outstanding ability and flamboyant personality made him a hero of boxing fans throughout the world, and he is sometimes considered the best fighter in history
Jr. Walker Smith
orig. Walker Smith, Jr. born May 3, 1921, Detroit, Mich., U.S. died April 12, 1989, Culver City, Calif. U.S. boxer. Robinson began boxing in high school in New York City and won all of his 89 amateur fights. He was six times a world champion, once (1946-51) as a welterweight (147 lbs) and five times (1951-60) as a middleweight (160 lbs). In 201 professional bouts, he made 109 knockouts. He suffered only 19 defeats, most when he was past
Kate Smith
orig. Kathryn Elizabeth Smith born May 1, 1909, Greenville, Va., U.S. died June 17, 1986, Raleigh, N.C. U.S. singer, long known as the "First Lady of Radio. " Smith studied nursing before moving to New York City, where she won a Broadway role as an overweight girl who was the butt of jokes. In 1931 she began her immensely popular radio show Kate Smith Sings, which ran for 16 years; her theme song, "When the Moon Comes over the Mountain," became familiar to millions. In 1938 she created the news and gossip program Kate Smith Speaks and introduced Irving Berlin's song "God Bless America." She hosted several television shows in the 1950s. In 1982 she was awarded the U.S. Medal of Freedom
Margaret Chase Smith
orig. Margaret Madeline Chase born Dec. 14, 1897, Skowhegan, Maine, U.S. died May 29, 1995, Skowhegan U.S. politician. She served as secretary to her husband, Clyde Smith, after he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican in 1936. When he suffered a heart attack in 1940, he urged voters to elect her to the office. She became the first woman to win election to both the House (1940-49) and the Senate (1949-73). Though a staunch anticommunist, she was the first Republican senator to condemn the tactics of Joseph McCarthy, delivering a memorable "Declaration of Conscience" speech on the Senate floor in 1950. Her opinion that Pres. John F. Kennedy should use nuclear weapons against the Soviet Union prompted Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev to dub her "the devil in disguise of a woman." She retired from politics after her defeat in 1972. She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1989
Margaret Smith Court
orig. Margaret Smith born July 16, 1942, Albury, N.S.W., Austl. Australian tennis player. She dominated women's tennis in the 1960s, winning 66 grand-slam championships in her career, more than any other person. In 1970 she became the second woman (after Maureen Connolly) to win the grand-slam (the Wimbledon, U.S., Australian, and French singles titles). In 1963, with fellow Australian Kenneth Fletcher, she became the only player to achieve the grand-slam in doubles as well as singles
Patti Smith
(born 1946) American rock singer and poet
Red Smith
orig. Walter Wellesley Smith born Sept. 25, 1905, Green Bay, Wis., U.S. died Jan. 15, 1982, Stamford, Conn. U.S. sports columnist. Smith worked for various newspapers before his column, "Views of Sport," began appearing in the New York Herald Tribune in 1945; it was syndicated soon thereafter. He joined The New York Times in 1971. His writing, mostly about major spectator sports, shunned jargon and displayed literary craftsmanship, wry humour, and deep knowledge. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1976. His columns were collected in five books, including Out of the Red (1950) and Strawberries in the Wintertime (1974)
Robert Smith Surtees
born May 17, 1803, The Riding, Northumberland, Eng. died March 16, 1864, Brighton, Sussex English novelist. Passionately addicted to riding to hounds from his youth, Surtees devoted nearly all his writings to horses and riding. In 1831 he launched New Sporting Magazine. His famous comic character Mr. Jorrocks, a blunt Cockney grocer entirely given over to fox hunting, appeared in Jorrocks's Jaunts and Jollities (1838), Handley Cross (1843), and Hillingdon Hall (1845). Among his other novels, which also portray the boredom, ill manners, discomfort, and coarse food of English provincial life, are Hawbuck Grange (1847) and Mr. Facey Romford's Hounds (1865)
Samuel Smith
born July 27, 1752, Carlisle, Pa. died April 22, 1839, Baltimore, Md., U.S. U.S. politician. He was a merchant in Baltimore and fought in the American Revolution. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1793-1803, 1816-22) and Senate (1803-15, 1822-33). As brigadier general of the Maryland militia, he commanded U.S. troops that defended Baltimore from the British in the War of 1812. After leading the militia against rioters, he was elected mayor of Baltimore (1835-38) at age 83
Simon Smith Kuznets
born April 30, 1901, Kharkov, Ukraine, Russian Empire died July 8, 1985, Cambridge, Mass., U.S. Russian-U.S. economist and statistician. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1922 and joined the National Bureau of Economic Research in 1927; he later taught at the University of Pennsylvania (1930-54), Johns Hopkins University (1954-60), and Harvard University (1960-71). His work emphasized the complexity of underlying data in the construction of economic models, stressing the need for information on population structure, technology, labour quality, government structure, trade, and markets. He also described the existence of cyclical variations in growth rates (now called "Kuznets cycles") and their links with underlying factors such as population. In 1971 he received the Nobel Prize
Stevie Smith
orig. Florence Margaret Smith born Sept. 20, 1902, Hull, Yorkshire, Eng. died March 7, 1971, London British poet. She lived most of her life with an aunt in a London suburb and worked many years as a secretary. Her poetry, an unsentimental combination of the ludicrous and the pathetic, expresses an original and visionary personality. In the 1960s her poetry readings became popular, and she made radio broadcasts and recordings. Her Collected Poems (1975) is illustrated with her James Thurber-like sketches; it includes her first book, A Good Time Was Had by All (1937), and Not Waving but Drowning (1957), whose title poem appears in many anthologies
Theobald Smith
born July 31, 1859, Albany, N.Y., U.S. died Dec. 10, 1934, New York, N.Y., U.S. U.S. microbiologist and pathologist. He received his M.D. from Cornell University. He discovered that injected heat-killed cultures of the causative microorganisms can immunize animals against disease. His discovery that Texas cattle fever is caused by a parasite transmitted by ticks the first definite proof of arthropods' role in spreading disease helped the scientific community accept mosquitoes' role in malaria and yellow fever. Smith was the first to differentiate the bacteria that cause tuberculosis in cattle and in humans, and he was one of the first to notice anaphylaxis. He also improved laboratory production of vaccines
Uriah Smith Stephens
born , Aug. 3, 1821, Cape May, N.J., U.S. died Feb. 13, 1882, Philadelphia, Pa. U.S. labour leader. Apprenticed as a tailor, he became involved in reform movements such as abolitionism and utopian socialism, and in 1862 he helped organize the Garment Cutters' Association of Philadelphia. In 1869 he cofounded the Noble Order of the Knights of Labor, the first national labour union in the U.S., and became its first leader (or grand master workman). The high calling of the union and the hostility of union-busters led Stephens to favour secrecy and ritual in its meetings, which became increasingly controversial, as did Stephens's opposition to strikes. In 1878 he resigned his post
W Eugene Smith
born Dec. 20, 1918, Wichita, Kan., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1978, Tucson, Ariz. U.S. photojournalist. He worked as a photographer for local papers then went to New York City and worked for several magazines. In 1943-44, as a war correspondent for Life magazine, he covered many of the important battles of the Pacific theatre. He produced a number of photoessays for Life, such as Spanish Village (1951), a study of villagers' daily struggle to draw life from exhausted soil. His most famous picture, The Walk to Paradise Garden (1947), showing his own children entering a forest clearing, concluded the landmark photographic exhibition The Family of Man
Will Smith
(born 1968) American rap artist and actor
William Eugene Smith
born Dec. 20, 1918, Wichita, Kan., U.S. died Oct. 15, 1978, Tucson, Ariz. U.S. photojournalist. He worked as a photographer for local papers then went to New York City and worked for several magazines. In 1943-44, as a war correspondent for Life magazine, he covered many of the important battles of the Pacific theatre. He produced a number of photoessays for Life, such as Spanish Village (1951), a study of villagers' daily struggle to draw life from exhausted soil. His most famous picture, The Walk to Paradise Garden (1947), showing his own children entering a forest clearing, concluded the landmark photographic exhibition The Family of Man
William Smith
born March 23, 1769, Churchill, Oxfordshire, Eng. died Aug. 28, 1839, Northampton, Northamptonshire English engineer and geologist, known as the founder of the science of stratigraphy. The son of a blacksmith, he was largely self-educated. He produced the first geologic map of England and Wales (1815), setting the style for modern geologic maps, and subsequently a series of geologic maps of the English counties. He introduced many techniques still used, including the use of fossils for the dating of layers. Current geologic maps of England differ from his primarily in detail, and many of the colourful names he applied to the strata are also used today
William Smith O'Brien
born Oct. 17, 1803, Dromoland, County Clare, Ire. died June 18, 1864, Bangor, Caernarvonshire, Wales Irish political insurgent. He served in the British House of Commons (1828-48) and initially supported the Anglo-Irish legislative union (see Act of Union). In 1843 he joined the anti-union Repeal Association, and in 1846 he broke with Daniel O'Connell to lead the radical Young Ireland movement. In 1848 he supported violent revolution and led an abortive insurrection in County Tipperary. Convicted of high treason, he received a death sentence that was commuted to exile in Tasmania. He was released in 1854 and pardoned in 1856
Winston Smith
the main character in the book 1984 (1949) by George Orwell, who lives in a time when the government controls everything that people do. Smith is punished by the government because he tries to have a romantic relationship with a woman
fort smith
a town in western Arkansas on the Arkansas River at the Oklahoma border
granny smith
apple with a green skin and hard tart flesh
smiths
plural of smith
web smith
one who creates World Wide Web pages (Computers)
smith

    Türkische aussprache

    smîth

    Aussprache

    /ˈsməᴛʜ/ /ˈsmɪθ/

    Etymologie

    [ smith ] (noun.) before 12th century. Middle English, from Old English smiþ (“metals craftsman”)

    Wort des Tages

    arborescent
Favoriten