scuttle

listen to the pronunciation of scuttle
Englisch - Englisch
A container like an open bucket (usually to hold and carry coal)
To deliberately sink a ship or boat by order of the commander, rather than by enemy action
A small hatch or opening in a boat. Also, small opening in a boat or ship for draining water from open deck
Intentionally undermine or thwart oneself, or denigrate or destroy one's position or property; compare scupper

The candidate had scuttled his chances with his unhinged outburst.

To move hastily, to scurry

there was a wisp or two of fine seaweed that had somehow got in, and a small crab was still alive and scuttled across the corner, yet the coffins were but little disturbed.

A hatch that provides access to the roof from the interior of a building
to sink (a ship) by making holes in the bottom
{n} a thing for coals, grate, quick place, a small hatch way
{v} to run about in a hurry, to cut holes in a ships bottom, to sink by letting in water
An opening in the ceiling leading to an unfinished half-story
{f} run or move quickly, scamper, scurry; cause a ship to sink by opening or creating holes in its hull
an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
To scuttle a plan or a proposal means to make it fail or cause it to stop. Such threats could scuttle the peace conference. = scupper
container for coal; shaped to permit pouring the coal onto the fire
A hatch that provides access to the roof from the interior of the building
A small opening or hatchway in the deck of a ship, large enough to admit a man, and with a lid for covering it, also, a like hole in the side or bottom of a ship
An opening in a ceiling which provides access to the attic
A hatchway or opening, equipped with a cover, and located in the ceiling
To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle
A broad, shallow basket
to cut a hole through the bottom of a ship; to sink or to wreck a vessel (This was the fate of the P S Lady Sherbrooke) (saborder)
To sink by making holes through the bottom of; as, to scuttle a ship
When people or small animals scuttle somewhere, they run there with short quick steps. Two very small children scuttled away in front of them
A unit that provides access to the roof from the interior of the building See also Hatch
A quick pace; a short run
A wide-mouthed vessel for holding coal: a coal hod
A framed opening in a roof used for access to the roof from inside a building
A small hatch or opening in a boat
{i} run, quick movement, scamper, scurry; hatch on the deck or side of a ship; container for carrying coal
A small opening in an outside wall or covering, furnished with a lid
to move about or proceed hurriedly; "so terrified by the extraordinary ebbing of the sea that they scurried to higher ground"
An opening in the roof of a house, with a lid
A unit that provides access to the roof from the interior of the building See also "Hatch"
The lid or door which covers or closes an opening in a roof, wall, or the like
To scuttle a ship means to sink it deliberately by making holes in the bottom. He personally had received orders from Commander Lehmann to scuttle the ship. a container for carrying coal
The body space between the rear of the bonnet and the windscreen
To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose
Category: Containers A container like an open bucket (usually to hold and carry coal)
coal scuttle
container for coal
coal scuttle
A coal scuttle is a container for keeping coal in. a specially shaped container with a handle for carrying coal
scuttles
third person singular present tense of the verb to scuttle
scuttles
plural of scuttle
scuttling
present participle of scuttle
scuttle

    Silbentrennung

    scut·tle

    Türkische aussprache

    skʌtıl

    Aussprache

    /ˈskətəl/ /ˈskʌtəl/

    Etymologie

    [ 'sk&-t&l ] (noun.) 15th century. Middle English scutel, from Latin scutella drinking bowl, tray, diminutive of scutra platter.

    Wort des Tages

    guillotine
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